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Jumpin' Jack Flash
"Jumpin' Jack Flash" is a song by English rock band the Rolling Stones, released as a single in 1968.[3] Called "supernatural Delta blues by way of Swinging London" by Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
magazine,[5] the song was perceived by some as the band's return to their blues roots after the baroque pop and psychedelia heard on their preceding albums, Aftermath (1966), Between the Buttons
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Psychedelic Music
Psychedelic filmAcid Western Stoner filmPsychedelic literatureCultureCounterculture Entheogen Smart shop Trip sitter Psychedelic microdosingDrugs25I-NBOMe 2C-B Ayahuasca Cannabis DMT Ibogaine Ketamine LSD Mescaline Peyote Psilocybin
Psilocybin
mushrooms Salvinorin A/Salvia San Pedro cactusList of psychedelic drugs List of psilocybin mushrooms Psychoactive cactusExperienceBad trip Ecology Ego death Serotonergic psychedelic TherapyHistoryAcid Tests Albert Hofmann History of lysergic acid diethylamide Owsley Stanley Psychedelic era Summer of
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Between The Buttons
Between the Buttons
Between the Buttons
is the fifth British and seventh American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released on 20 January 1967 in the UK and 21 January in the US as the follow-up to Aftermath. It was the beginning of the Stones' brief foray into psychedelia. In 2012, the American version of Between the Buttons, which included "Let's Spend the Night Together" and "Ruby Tuesday", was ranked #357 on Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[1]Contents1 Recording and background 2 Artwork 3 Release and reception 4 Track listing4.1 Original release 4.2 American release4.2.1 Track listing5 Personnel 6 Charts6.1 Weekly charts 6.2 Singles7 Certifications 8 References 9 External linksRecording and background[edit] Sessions for the album began on 3 August 1966 and lasted until the 11th at Los Angeles' RCA Studios during the Rolling Stones' 1966 American Tour. David Hassinger was the engineer for the album
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Delta Blues
Delta blues
Delta blues
is one of the earliest-known styles of blues music. It originated in the Mississippi
Mississippi
Delta, a region of the United States stretching from Memphis, Tennessee, in the north to Vicksburg, Mississippi, in the south and from Helena, Arkansas, in the west to the Yazoo River
Yazoo River
in the east. The Mississippi
Mississippi
Delta is famous for its fertile soil and for its poverty. Delta blues
Delta blues
is regarded as a regional variant of country blues. Guitar
Guitar
and harmonica are its dominant instruments; slide guitar (usually played on a steel guitar) is a hallmark of the style
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Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
is an American biweekly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson
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Blues
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Baroque Pop
Baroque pop
Baroque pop
(sometimes called baroque rock) is a fusion genre that combines rock music with particular elements of classical music.[4][2][3] It emerged in the mid 1960s as artists pursued a majestic, orchestral sound[2] and is identifiable for its appropriation of Baroque compositional styles (contrapuntal melodies and functional harmony patterns) and dramatic or melancholic gestures.[1] Harpsichords figure prominently,[5][3] while oboes, French horns, and string quartets are also common.[3] Although harpsichords had been deployed for a number of pop hits since the 1940s, starting in the 1960s, some record producers increasingly pl
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Single (music)
In music, a single, record single or music single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record, an album or an EP record. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album. As digital downloading and audio streaming have become more prevalent, it is often possible for every track on an album to also be available separately
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Aftermath (The Rolling Stones Album)
Aftermath, released in April 1966 by Decca Records, is the fourth British studio album by the Rolling Stones. It was issued in the United States in June 1966 by London Records
London Records
as the group's sixth American album. The album is considered an artistic breakthrough for the band: it is the first to consist entirely of Mick Jagger–Keith Richards compositions, while Brian Jones
Brian Jones
played a variety of instruments not usually associated with their music, including sitar, Appalachian dulcimer,[1] marimbas and Japanese koto, as well as guitar, harmonica and keyboards, though much of the music is still rooted in Chicago electric blues. It was the first Rolling Stones album to be recorded entirely in the US, at the RCA Studios in California, and their first album released in true stereo
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Their Satanic Majesties Request
Their Satanic Majesties Request
Their Satanic Majesties Request
is the sixth British and eighth American studio album by the Rolling Stones, released in December 1967 by Decca Records
Decca Records
in the United Kingdom and London Records
London Records
in the United States. Recording sessions saw the band experimenting widely with a psychedelic sound in the studio, incorporating elements such as unconventional instruments, sound effects, string arrangements, and African rhythms. The album's title is a play on the "Her Britannic Majesty requests and requires ..." text that appears inside a British passport
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Nashville Tuning (high Strung)
Nashville or high strung tuning refers to the practice of replacing the wound E, A, D and G strings on a six-string guitar with lighter gauge strings to allow tuning an octave higher than standard.[1] This is usually achieved by using one string from each of the six courses of a twelve string set, using the higher string for those courses tuned in octaves. The Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
song "Hey You" from the album The Wall
The Wall
and the Kansas song "Dust in the Wind" [2] from their Point of Know Return
Point of Know Return
album are notable for using this form of guitar tuning. In "Hey You" David Gilmour replaced the low E string with a second high E (not a 12-string set low E octave) such that it was two octaves up. The Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses" also features both a 12-string guitar played by Keith Richards
Keith Richards
and a guitar with Nashville tuning played by Mick Taylor
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The Mental Traveller
"The Mental Traveller" is a poem by William Blake. It is part of a collection of unpublished works called The Pickering Manuscript and was written in a manner that suggests the poem was to be read directly from the collection. The poem is about travelling in the realm of the mind. Blake generalizes here "about the spiritual history of mankind out the experience of his own spiritual history."[1] It can be also understood as a cycle history of relations between society and idea of liberty in the form of a male and female that grow older and younger in opposition to the other experiencing such changes
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William Blake
William Blake
Blake
(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake
Blake
is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age
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Tina Turner
Tina
Tina
Turner (born November 26, 1939) is an American-born Swiss singer, songwriter, dancer, actress, and author. Turner rose to international prominence as a featured singer with Ike Turner's Kings of Rhythm before recording hit singles both with Ike Turner
Ike Turner
and as a solo performer. One of the world's best-selling artists of all time, she has been referred to as The Queen of Rock 'n' Roll.[3][4][5] has sold more than 200 million albums and singles worldwide to date.[6] She is noted for her energetic stage presence, powerful vocals, well-proportioned legs, and career longevity.[4][7] According to Guinness World Records, Turner has sold more concert tickets than any other solo performer in history.[8] Turner was born Anna Mae Bullock to a small Tennessee family. Growing up throughout the Southeastern United States
United States
she began singing in local church choirs
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Peter Frampton
Peter Kenneth Frampton (born 22 April 1950) is a British-American rock musician, singer, songwriter, producer, and guitarist. He was previously associated with the bands Humble Pie
Humble Pie
and The Herd. At the end of his 'group' career was Frampton's international breakthrough album, his live release Frampton Comes Alive!. The album sold more than 8 million copies in the United States and spawned several hit singles.[1] Since then he has released several major albums. He has also worked with David Bowie
David Bowie
and both Matt Cameron
Matt Cameron
and Mike McCready from Pearl Jam, among others. Frampton is best known for such hits as "Breaking All the Rules", "Show Me the Way", "Baby, I Love Your Way", "Do You Feel Like We Do", and "I'm in You", which remain staples on classic rock radio. He has also appeared as himself in television shows such as The Simpsons
The Simpsons
and Family Guy
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Mick Jagger
Sir
Sir
Michael Philip Jagger (born 26 July 1943), known professionally as Mick Jagger, is an English singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, composer and actor who gained fame as the lead singer and one of the founder members of the Rolling Stones. Jagger's career has spanned over five decades, and he has been described as "one of the most popular and influential frontmen in the history of rock & roll".[3] His distinctive voice and performances, along with Keith Richards' guitar style have been the trademark of the Rolling Stones throughout the band's career. Jagger gained press notoriety for his admitted drug use and romantic involvements, and was often portrayed as a countercultural figure. Jagger was born and grew up in Dartford, Kent. He studied at the London School of Economics
London School of Economics
before abandoning his academic career to join the Rolling Stones
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