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Julius Streicher
Julius Streicher
Julius Streicher
(12 February 1885 – 16 October 1946) was a prominent member of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) prior to World War II. He was the founder and publisher of the anti-Semitic newspaper Der Stürmer, which became a central element of the Nazi
Nazi
propaganda machine. His publishing firm also released three anti-Semitic books for children, including the 1938 Der Giftpilz
Der Giftpilz
(translated into English as The Toadstool or The Poisonous Mushroom[1]), one of the most widespread pieces of propaganda, which warned about the supposed dangers Jews posed by using the metaphor of an attractive yet deadly mushroom
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Medieval
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Propaganda
Propaganda
Propaganda
is information that is not objective and is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, often by presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented.[1] Propaganda is often associated with material prepared by governments, but activist groups, companies and the media can also produce propaganda. In the twentieth century, the term propaganda has been associated with a manipulative approach, but propaganda historically was a neutral descriptive term.[1][2] A wide ra
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German Jews
Jewish settlers founded the Ashkenazi Jewish community in the Early (5th to 10th centuries CE) and High Middle Ages
High Middle Ages
(circa 1000–1299 CE). The community survived under Charlemagne, but suffered during the Crusades. Accusations of well poisoning during the Black Death (1346–53) led to mass slaughter of German Jews,[3] and they fled in large numbers to Poland. The Jewish communities of the cities of Mainz, Speyer, and Worms
Worms
became the center of Jewish life during Medieval times. "This was a golden age as area bishops protected the Jews
Jews
resulting in increased trade and prosperity."[4] The First Crusade began an era of persecution of Jews
Jews
in Germany.[5] Entire communities, like those of Trier, Worms, Mainz, and Cologne, were murdered. The war upon the Hussite
Hussite
heretics became the signal for renewed persecution of Jews
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Hanover
Hanover
Hanover
or Hannover
Hannover
(/ˈhænoʊvər, -nə-/; German: Hannover [haˈnoːfɐ] ( listen)), on the River Leine, is the capital and largest city of the German state of Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony
(Niedersachsen), and was once by personal union the family seat of the Hanoverian Kings of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland, under their title as the dukes of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Brunswick-Lüneburg
(later described as the Elector of Hanover)
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Revolutionary
A revolutionary is a person who either participates in, or advocates revolution.[1] Also, when used as an adjective, the term revolutionary refers to something that has a major, sudden impact on society or on some aspect of human endeavor.Contents1 Definition 2 Revolution
Revolution
and ideology 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDefinition[edit] The term —both as a noun and adjective— is usually applied to the field of politics, and is occasionally used in the context of science, invention or art. In politics, a revolutionary is someone who supports abrupt, rapid, and drastic change, while a reformist is someone who supports more gradual and incremental change. A conservative is someone who generally opposes such changes
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Rudolf Von Sebottendorf
Adam Alfred Rudolf Glauer (9 November 1875 – 8 May 1945?), better known under his pseudo-aristocratic alias Rudolf Freiherr von Sebottendorff (or von Sebottendorf) was a German occultist, writer, intelligence agent and political activist. He was an important figure in the activities of the Thule Society, a post-World War I German occultist organization that influenced many members of the Nazi Party. He was a Freemason,[1] a Sufi of the Bektashi order - after his conversion to Islam[2] - and a practitioner of meditation, astrology, numerology, and alchemy.[3] He also used the alias Erwin Torre. Contents1 Early life 2 Occult and mystical influences 3 Involvement with the Thule Society 4 Later life 5 Notes 6 Bibliography6.1 Works 6.2 References 6.3 Further reading7 External linksEarly life[edit] Glauer was born in Hoyerswerda in the Prussian Province of Silesia (present-day Saxony), the son of a locomotive engineer
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Bolshevik
The Bolsheviks, originally also Bolshevists[1][a] or Bolsheviki[3] (Russian: большевики, большевик (singular), IPA: [bəlʲʂɨˈvʲik]; derived from большинство bol'shinstvo, "majority", literally meaning "one of the majority"), were a faction of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (RSDLP) which split apart from the Menshevik
Menshevik
faction[b] at the Second Party Congress in 1903.[4] The RSDLP was a revolutionary socialist political party formed in 1898 in
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German Revolution Of 1918–19
Weimar Republic
Weimar Republic
victory:Abdication of Emperor Wilhelm II Monarchy of Germany
Monarchy of Germany
and its 22 constituent monarchies abolished Suppre
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Gauleiter
A Gauleiter
Gauleiter
(German pronunciation: [ˈɡaʊlaɪtɐ]) was the party leader of a regional branch of the NSDAP (more commonly known as the Nazi
Nazi
Party) or the head of a Gau or of a Reichsgau. The word can be singular or plural, depending on the context. Gauleiter
Gauleiter
was the second highest Nazi
Nazi
Party paramilitary rank, subordinate only to the higher rank Reichsleiter and to the position of Führer
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Antisemitism
Antisemitism
Antisemitism
(also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.[1][2][3] A person who holds such positions is called an antisemite. Antisemitism is generally considered to be a form of racism.[4][5] Antisemitism
Antisemitism
may be manifested in many ways, ranging from expressions of hatred of or discrimination against individual Jews
Jews
to organized pogroms by mobs, state police, or even military attacks on entire Jewish communities. Although the term did not come into common usage until the 19th century, it is now also applied to historic anti-Jewish incidents
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Lieutenant
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Iron Cross
The Iron Cross
Iron Cross
(German:  Eisernes Kreuz (help·info), abbreviated EK) was a military decoration in the Kingdom of Prussia, and later in the German Empire
German Empire
(1871–1918) and Nazi Germany (1933–1945). It was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia in March 1813 backdated to the birthday of his late wife Queen Louise on 10 March 1813 during the Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(EK 1813). Louise was the first person to receive this decoration (posthumous).[1] The recommissioned Iron Cross
Iron Cross
was also awarded during the Franco-Prussian War (EK 1870), World War I
World War I
(EK 1914), and World War II
World War II
(EK 1939, re-introduced with a swastika added in the center)
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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German Army (German Empire)
The Imperial German Army
German Army
(German: Deutsches Heer) was the name given to the combined land and air forces of the German Empire
German Empire
(excluding the Marine-Fliegerabteilung maritime aviation formations of the Kaiserliche Marine). The term Deutsches Heer is also used for the modern German Army, the land component of the Bundeswehr
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Crime Against Humanity
Crimes against humanity
Crimes against humanity
are certain acts that are deliberately committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack or individual attack directed against any civilian or an identifiable part of a civilian population. The first prosecution for crimes against humanity took place at the Nuremberg trials. Crimes against humanity
Crimes against humanity
have since been prosecuted by other international courts (for example, the International Court of Justice
Justice
and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court) as well as in domestic prosecutions. The law of crimes against humanity has primarily developed through the evolution of customary international law
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