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Julius Excluded From Heaven
Julius Excluded from Heaven
Heaven
(Latin: Iulius exclusus e coelis) is a dialogue that was written in 1514, commonly attributed to the Dutch humanist and theologian Desiderius Erasmus. It involves Pope Julius II, who had recently died, trying to persuade Saint Peter
Saint Peter
to allow him to enter Heaven
Heaven
by using the same tactics he applied when alive. The dialogue is also supplemented by a "Genius" (his guardian angel) who makes wry comments about the pope and his deeds.Contents1 Plot 2 Authorship 3 Citations 4 External linksPlot[edit] The dialogue begins with a drunken Pope Julius II
Pope Julius II
trying to open the gate of heaven with the key to his secret money-chest. He is accompanied by his Genius, his guardian angel. Behind him are the soldiers who died in his military campaigns, who he promised would go to heaven regardless of their deeds
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Pope Julius II
Pope
Pope
Julius II (Italian: Papa Giulio II; Latin: Iulius II) (5 December 1443 – 21 February 1513), born Giuliano della Rovere, and nicknamed "The Fearsome Pope"[1] and "The Warrior Pope". During his nine-year pontificate his military and diplomatic interventions averted a take-over by France
France
of the Italian States (including the Papal States). He also proved a bulwark against Venetian expansionism.[2] His spiritual leadership was less impressive. The quintessential "Renaissance pope", Julius' rule from 1 November 1503 to his death in 1513 was marked by an active foreign policy, ambitious building projects, and patronage of the arts. He commissioned the rebuilding of St. Peter's Basilica, and Michelangelo's decoration of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel
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A Playne And Godly Exposition Or Declaration Of The Commune Crede
A playne and godly Exposytion or Declaration of the Commune Crede is a 1533 work of religious commentary by Desiderius Erasmus, written at the request of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and dealing with the Apostles' Creed from a Roman Catholic point of view. It was written in part as a result of the dispute between Erasmus and Martin Luther on certain aspects of the nature of the Catholic Creed.[1] The Exposytion of the Commune Creed was published as an English translation of Erasmus's original text. It carried the subtitle "A Dialog called the Symbole or instructyon in the christen fayth or belyue, made by Mayster Erasmus of Roterdame. The persones speakynge, are the Mayster, and the Disciple, the one is marked by M the other by D."[2] In effect it is a question-and-answer dialog, between a disciple wishing "to be ascrybed and receiued into the company and feloshype of the catholyke churche"[2] and a master, on the common creed necessary
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Copia
Copia may refer to: Copia (or Copiae), the ancient city and bishopric also called Thurii or Thurium, now a Latin Catholic titular Copia (Boeotia) (or Copae or Copiae), an ancient Greek city in Boeotia Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, a 1512 rhetorical guidebook by Desiderius Erasmus Copia: The American Center for Wine, Food & the Arts, the former museum in Napa, California The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, a branch campus of the culinary school Cornucopia, a symbol of abundance and nourishment
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The Education Of A Christian Prince
The Education of a Christian Prince (Latin: Institutio principis Christiani) is a Renaissance "how-to" book for princes, by Desiderius Erasmus, which advises the reader on how to be a "good Christian" prince. The book was dedicated to Prince Charles, who later became Habsburg Emperor Charles V. Erasmus wrote the book in 1516, the same year that Thomas More finished his Utopia and three years after Machiavelli had written his advice book for rulers Il Principe. The Principe, however, was not published until 1532, 16 years later. Erasmus stated that teachers should be of gentle disposition and have unimpeachable morals. A good education included all the liberal arts. Like the Roman educator Quintilian, Erasmus was against corporal punishment for unruly students. He stressed the student must be treated as an individual
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Paraphrases Of Erasmus
The Paraphrases were Latin Biblical paraphrases, rewritings of the Gospels by Desiderius Erasmus. They were composed between 1517 and 1524 and occasionally revised by Erasmus during the remaining years of his life. The publication history of the Paraphrases is complicated. Erasmus began with the Pauline Epistles. The paraphrase of Romans was published in quarto by Dirk Martens in Louvain in November 1517 and reprinted by Erasmus's friend Johann Froben in January of the following year; it sold well and was soon reprinted in octavo. Corinthians was published by Martens in February 1519 and reprinted in Basel by Froben in March; Galatians appeared later that year, with editions from both publishers. The remaining Epistles followed in 1520 and 1521, the last to appear being Hebrews. In the autumn of 1521 Erasmus moved from Louvain to Basel, and from that time Froben published the first editions of the remaining Paraphrases
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Colloquies
Colloquies (Latin title Colloquia familiaria) is one of the many works of the "Prince of Christian Humanists", Desiderius Erasmus. Published in 1518, the pages "...held up contemporary religious practices for examination in a more serious but still pervasively ironic tone".[1] Christian Humanists viewed Erasmus as their leader in the early 16th century. Erasmus' works had greater meaning to those learned few who had a larger knowledge of Latin and Greek. Colloquies in Latin means a formal written dialogue, thus in his book Erasmus explores man's reaction to others in conversations. The Colloquies is a collection of dialogues on a wide variety of subjects. They began in the late 1490s as informal Latin exercises for Erasmus' own pupils. In about 1522 he began to perceive the possibilities this form might hold for continuing his campaign for the gradual enlightenment and reform of all Christendom
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De Libero Arbitrio Diatribe Sive Collatio
De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio (literally Of free will: Discourses or Comparisons) is the Latin title of a polemical work written by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam in 1524
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Ciceronianus
Ciceronianus
Ciceronianus
("The Ciceronian") is a treatise written by Desiderius Erasmus
Erasmus
and published in 1528.[1] It attacks the style of scholarly Latin
Latin
written during the early 16th century, which style attempted to ape Cicero's Latin.Contents1 Content 2 Replies 3 References 4 External linksContent[edit] As Cicero
Cicero
lived before Jesus, Erasmus
Erasmus
saw Cicero's Latin
Latin
as pagan, and therefore unsuited to translating holy texts
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Ecclesiastes Of Erasmus
Ecclesiastes: On the Art of Preaching (Latin: Ecclesiastes: sive de ratione concionandi) was a 1535 book by Desiderius Erasmus.[1] One of the last major works he produced, Ecclesiastes focuses on the subject of effective preaching. Previously, Erasmus had written treatises on the Christian layperson, Christian prince, and Christian educator. Friends and admirers, including Bishop John Fisher suggested that Erasmus write on the office of the Christian priesthood. He began writing the text in 1523, finally completing and printing Ecclesiastes in 1535.Contents1 Sections 2 Combination, not separation 3 Role of the preacher 4 Humor 5 Influence 6 ReferencesSections[edit] Ecclesiastes is divided into four sections, but Erasmus himself declares that those sections cover three themes. Section one is a discussion of the value of the office of priest, and the qualities that an effective preacher exemplifies and cultivates
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Handbook Of A Christian Knight
The Handbook of a Christian Knight (Latin: Enchiridion militis Christiani), sometimes translated as The Manual of a Christian Knight, is a work written by Dutch scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam in 1501, and was first published in English in 1533 by William Tyndale. During a stay in Tournehem, a castle near Saint-Omer in the north of modern-day France, Erasmus encountered an uncivilized, yet friendly soldier who was an acquaintance of Battus, Erasmus' close friend. On the request of the soldier's pious wife, who felt slighted by her husband's behaviour, Battus asked Erasmus to write a text which would convince the soldier of the necessity of mending his ways, which he did. The resulting work was eventually re-drafted by Erasmus and expanded into the Enchiridion militis Christiani.[1] The Enchiridion is an appeal on Christians to act in accordance with the Christian faith rather than merely performing the necessary rites
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Adagia
Adagia (singular adagium) is the title of an annotated collection of Greek and Latin proverbs, compiled during the Renaissance by Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus. Erasmus' collection of proverbs is "one of the most monumental ... ever assembled" (Speroni, 1964, p. 1). The first edition, titled Collectanea Adagiorum, was published in Paris in 1500, in a slim quarto of around eight hundred entries. By 1508, after his stay in Italy, Erasmus had expanded the collection (now called Adagiorum chiliades or "Thousands of proverbs") to over 3,000 items, many accompanied by richly annotated commentaries, some of which were brief essays on political and moral topics
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Textus Receptus
Textus Receptus
Textus Receptus
(Latin: "received text") is the name given to the succession of printed Greek texts of the New Testament
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Apophthegmatum Opus
Apophthegmatum opus is a translation of Plutarch's Apophthegmata by Erasmus of Rotterdam, a collection of apophthegms from classical antiquity.[citation needed] Many classical apophthegms repeated ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Alexander the Great.[citation needed] According to Speroni, Apophthegmatum opus is one of "the most monumental collections of classical apophthegms… ever assembled…"[1]:1 Here are a few samples of Erasmus' apophthegms:While on the march with his army one winter, Alexander the Great was sitting by a campfire, watching the army as it marched by. He noticed an old warrior shivering from the cold, trying to find a place near the fire. Alexander bade the man sit in his own chair, saying, "If you had been born a Persian, it would cost you your head to sit in the king's chair, but you are a Macedonian, not a Persian
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The First Tome Or Volume Of The Paraphrase Of Erasmus Vpon The Newe Testamente
The First tome or volume of the Paraphrase of Erasmus upon the new testament edited by Nicholas Udall, first published in January 1548 by Edward Whitchurch,[1] is the first volume of a book combining an English translation of the New Testament interleaved with an English translation of Desiderius Erasmus's Latin paraphrase of the New Testament.[2] The second volume was published in 1549.[3] Translations were by Nicolas Udall, Catherine Parr, Thomas Key, Miles Coverdale, John Olde, Leonard Coxe, and Mary I of England. According to a royal Injunction of 1547, copies were to be kept in every parish church in England, emphasizing the influence of Erasmus on the English Reformation.Contents1 Background 2 Printing history 3 Contents 4 Catalog entries 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] The Paraphrases of Erasmus, which were composed and published between 1517 and 1523, exerted great influence on English Christianity of the time
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Praemium Erasmianum Foundation
Patron: Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands Chairman: Ernst Hirsch BallinWebsite www.erasmusprijs.orgThe Praemium Erasmianum Foundation is a Dutch cultural institution that works in the humanities, the social science and the arts. It was founded in 1958 by Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. The aim of the Foundation is to strengthen the position of the arts, the social sciences and the humanities. The Foundation is motivated by the ideas of Desiderius Erasmus, from whom it derives its name, and European cultural traditions
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