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Julien Donkey-Boy
Julien Donkey-Boy
Julien Donkey-Boy
is a 1999 American drama film written and directed by Harmony Korine. The story concentrates on the schizophrenic Julien, played by Scottish actor Ewen Bremner, and his dysfunctional family. The film also stars Chloë Sevigny
Chloë Sevigny
as Julien's sister, Pearl, and Werner Herzog
Werner Herzog
as his father. Julien Donkey-Boy
Julien Donkey-Boy
is the sixth film to be made under the self-imposed rules of the Dogme 95
Dogme 95
manifesto, and the first non-European film to be made under the Dogme 95
Dogme 95
"vow of chastity".Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production3.1 Dogme 954 Release4.1 Critical reception5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] The film opens on television footage of an ice dancer - a recurring motif in the film - before cutting away to Julien, a young man with untreated schizophrenia
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Limited Release
Limited release is a film distribution strategy of releasing a new film in a few theaters across a country, typically in major metropolitan markets. The purpose is often used to gauge the appeal of specialty films, like documentaries, independent films and art films. A common practice by film studios is to give highly anticipated and critically acclaimed films a limited release on or before December 31 in Los Angeles County to qualify for an Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination (as by its rules)
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Empire Magazine
Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Bauer Consumer Media of Hamburg
Hamburg
based Bauer Media Group. From the first issue in July 1989, the magazine was edited by Barry McIlheney and published by Emap. Bauer purchased Emap
Emap
Consumer Media in early 2008. It is the highest selling film magazine in the United Kingdom and is also published in the United States, Australia, Turkey, Russia, Italy
Italy
and Portugal
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Epidemic (film)
Epidemic is a Danish horror film of 1987 directed by Lars von Trier, the second installment of Trier's Europa trilogy. The other two films in the trilogy are The Element of Crime
The Element of Crime
(1984) and Europa (1991). Co-written by Trier and Niels Vørsel, the film focuses on the screenwriting process. Vørsel and Trier play themselves, coming up with a last-minute script for a producer. The story is inter-cut with scenes from the film they write, in which Trier plays a renegade doctor trying to cure a modern-day epidemic. The film marks the first in a series of collaborations between Trier and Udo Kier.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Release and awards3.1 Critical reception4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] The film is divided into five days. On the first day the protagonists, screenwriters Lars and Niels lose the only copy of a film script (Kommisæren Og Luderen, "The Policeman and the Whore", a reference to The Element of Crime)
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Lars Von Trier
Lars von Trier
Lars von Trier
(born Lars Trier, 30 April 1956)[3] is a Danish film director and screenwriter[4] with a prolific and controversial[5][6] career spanning almost four decades. His work is known for its genre and technical innovation;[7][8] confrontational examination of existential, social,[9][10] and political[5][11] issues; and his treatment of subjects[11] such as mercy,[12] sacrifice, and mental health.[13] Among his more than 100 awards and 200 nominations[14] at film festivals worldwide, von Trier has received: the Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
(for Dancer in the Dark), the Grand Prix (for Breaking the Waves), the Prix du Jury (for Europa), and the Technical Grand Prize (for The Element of Crime and Europa) at the Cannes Film Festival
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Los Angeles
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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Wide Release
In the American motion picture industry, a wide release is a motion picture that is playing nationally. This is contrast to a film that is having premiere showings at a few cinemas (usually in New York and Los Angeles), or is in limited release at selected cinemas in larger cities around the country. Specifically, a movie is considered to be a wide release when it plays in 600 cinemas or more in the United States and Canada.[1] In the U.S., films holding an NC-17 rating have almost never received wide releases. Showgirls (1995) is the only film with an NC-17 rating to have a wide release.[2] The 1975 film Breakout was the first major studio film to go into wide release in its opening week, with Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures
distributing 1300 prints nationwide, combined with a heavy national advertising campaign.[3] See also[edit]Art film Film
Film
releaseReferences[edit]^ About Movie Box Office Tracking and Terms
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Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
is an American review aggregation website for film and television. The company was launched in August 1998 and since January 2010 has been owned by Flixster, which was, in turn, acquired in 2011 by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
In February 2016, Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
and its parent site Flixster were sold to Comcast's Fandango
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Metacritic
Metacritic
Metacritic
is a website that aggregates reviews of media products: music albums, video games, films, TV shows, and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged (a weighted average).[2] Metacritic
Metacritic
was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of green, yellow or red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It has been described as the video game industry's "premier" review aggregator.[3][4] Metacritic's scoring converts each review into a percentage, either mathematically from the mark given, or which the site decides subjectively from a qualitative review
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San Francisco Chronicle
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Chronicle is a newspaper serving primarily the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. It was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young.[2] The paper is currently owned by the Hearst Corporation, which bought it from the de Young family in 2000. It is the only major daily paper covering the city and county of San Francisco. The paper benefited from the growth of San Francisco
San Francisco
and was the largest circulation newspaper on the West Coast of the United States by 1880. Like many other newspapers, it has experienced a rapid fall in circulation in the early 21st century, and was ranked 24th by circulation nationally for the six months to March 2010
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Diegetic
Diegesis (/ˌdaɪəˈdʒiːsɪs/; from the Greek διήγησις from διηγεῖσθαι, "to narrate") is a style of fiction storytelling that presents an interior view of a world in which:details about the world itself and the experiences of its characters are revealed explicitly through narrative the story is told or recounted, as opposed to shown or enacted.[1] there is a presumed detachment from the story of both the speaker and the audience.In diegesis the narrator tells the story. The narrator presents the actions (and sometimes thoughts) of the characters to the readers or audience
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Kevin Thomas (film Critic)
Kevin B. Thomas (born 1936) is an American film critic. He began writing film reviews for the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
in 1962, and served in that role until 2005. His long tenure made him the longest-running film critic among major United States newspapers.[1] Thomas was known for giving fairly positive reviews compared to other critics, and certainly less critical than Kenneth Turan, who joined the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
in 1991.[2][3][4] In 2003, the National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association gave Thomas a Lifetime Achievement Award.[5] Thomas was born in Los Angeles in 1936. He earned a bachelor's degree from Gettysburg College
Gettysburg College
in 1958 and master's degree from Pennsylvania State University in 1960.[1][6] References[edit]^ a b Interview with Kevin Thomas, Alternative Projections – Los Angeles Filmforum, Retrieved October 21, 2013 ^ Anderson, John and Laura Kim
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Chicago Sun Times
The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is the flagship paper of the Sun-Times Media Group.Contents1 History1.1 The 1940s, 1950s and 1960s 1.2 The 1970s 1.3 The 1980s 1.4 The 1990s 1.5 The 2000s 1.6 The 2010s2 Awards and notable stories 3 Staff 4 Early Edition 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the city. It began in 1844 as the Chicago
Chicago
Daily Journal,[5] which was the first newspaper to publish the rumor, now believed false, that a cow owned by Catherine O'Leary
Catherine O'Leary
was responsible for the Chicago
Chicago
fire.[6] The Evening Journal, whose West Side building at 17-19 S
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Roger Ebert
Roger Joseph Ebert (/ˈiːbərt/; June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American film critic, historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Criticism. Ebert and Chicago
Chicago
Tribune critic Gene Siskel
Gene Siskel
helped popularize nationally televised film reviewing when they co-hosted the PBS
PBS
show Sneak Previews, followed by several variously named At the Movies programs. The two verbally sparred and traded humorous barbs while discussing films. They created and trademarked the phrase "Two Thumbs Up," used when both hosts gave the same film a positive review
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