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Judo
Judo
Judo
(柔道, jūdō, meaning "gentle way") was created as a physical, mental and moral pedagogy in Japan, in 1882, by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎). It is generally categorized as a modern martial art which later evolved into a combat and Olympic sport. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defenses are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms (kata, 形) and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice (randori, 乱取り)
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JUDO (computer Programming Environment)
Programming may refer to:Broadcast programming, scheduling content for television Computer programming, the act of instructing computers to perform tasks Programming language, an artificial language designed to communicate instructions to a machine Game programming, the software development of video gamesDramatic programming, fictional television content Mathematical programming, or optimization, is the selection of a best element Neuro-linguistic programming, a pseudoscientific method aimed at modifying human behavior Programming (music), generating music
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Pedagogy
Pedagogy
Pedagogy
(/ˈpɛdəˌɡɒdʒi/) is the discipline that deals with the theory and practice of teaching and how these influence student learning.[1][2][3] Pedagogy
Pedagogy
informs teacher actions, judgments, and teaching strategies by taking into consideration theories of learning, understandings of students and their needs, and the backgrounds and interests of individual students.[4][5] Pedagogy
Pedagogy
includes how the teacher interacts with students and the social and intellectual environment the teacher seeks to establish.[4][5] Its aims may include furthering liberal education (the general development of human potential) to the narrower specifics of vocational education (the imparting and acquisition of specific skills). Instructive strategies are governed by the pupil's background knowledge and experience, situation, and environment, as well as learning goals set by the student and teacher
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Shiro Saigo
Shiro, Shirō or Shirou may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Fictional characters 3 Places 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople[edit]Amakusa Shirō (1621–1638), leader of the Shimabara Rebellion Ken Shiro (born 1992), Japanese boxer Shiro Azumi, Japanese football player 1923–1925 Shiro Ichinoseki (born 1944), Japanese weightlifter Shirō Ishii (1892–1959), Japanese microbiologist and lieutenant general Shiro Izumi (born 1961), Japanese actor, known for the Super Sentai franchise Shiro Kashiwa (1912–1998), Attorney General of Hawaii from 1959 Shiro Kawase (1889–1946), Japanese admiral Shiro Kikuhara (born 1969), Japanese football player Shiro Kishibe (born 1949), Japanese actor Shiro Koshinaka (born 1958), Japanese wrestler Shiro Kuramata (1934–1991), Japanese designer Shiro Makino (1893–1945), Japanese general at the Battle of Leyte Shiro Maruyama (born 1948), Japanese fencer Shiro Misaki, Japanese football player 1934 Shiro Miya (1943–2012), Japanese en
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Taitō, Tokyo
Taitō
Taitō
(台東区, Taitō-ku) is a special ward located in Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. In English, it is known as Taitō
Taitō
City.[1] As of May 1, 2015, the ward has an estimated population of 186,276, and a population density of 18,420 persons per km². The total area is 10.11 km². This makes Taito
Taito
ward the smallest of Tokyo's wards in area, and third smallest in population.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Landmarks3.1 Districts 3.2 Temples and shrines 3.3 Parks 3.4 Museums and zoos 3.5 Entertainment4 Education4.1 Colleges and universities 4.2 Primary and secondary schools 4.3 Public libraries 4.4 Other5 Economy5.1 Retail 5.2 Other6 Events 7 Transportation7.1 Rail 7.2 Highways8 Sports and recreation 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The ward was founded on March 15, 1947
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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University Of Tokyo
Coordinates: 35°42′48″N 139°45′44″E / 35.71333°N 139.76222°E / 35.71333; 139.76222University of Tokyo東京大学Latin: Universitas TociensisFormer namesImperial University (1886–1897) Tokyo
Tokyo
Imperial University (1897–1947)Type Public (National)Established 1877Academic affiliationsIARU APRU AEARU AGS BESETOHAPresident Makoto Gonokami (五神真)Academic staff2,429 full-time 175 part-time[1]Administrative staff5,779Students 28,697[2]Undergraduates 14,274Postgraduates 13,732Doctoral students6,022Other students747 research studentsLocation Bunkyō, Tokyo, JapanCampus UrbanColors Light Blue     Athletics 46 varsity teamsWebsite www.u-tokyo.ac.jpThe University of Tokyo
Tokyo
(東京大学, Tōkyō daigaku), abbreviated as Todai (東大, Tōdai)[3] or UTokyo,[4] is a public research university located in Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
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Tokugawa Shogunate
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo
Edo
bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.[1] The head of government was the shōgun,[2] and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3] The Tokugawa shogunate
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Shiba, Tokyo
Shiba (芝) is an area of Minato ward in Tokyo, Japan
Japan
and one of districts in the Shiba area.Contents1 Shiba area 2 Shiba area (administrative) 3 Shiba district3.1 Economy 3.2 Education 3.3 Embassies4 ReferencesShiba area[edit] Shiba was a ward of Tokyo
Tokyo
City from 1878 to 1947. It was merged with Akasaka and Azabu
Azabu
wards to form Minato ward on March 15, 1947
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Japanese Calligraphy
Japanese calligraphy
Japanese calligraphy
(書道, shodō) also called shūji (習字) is a form of calligraphy, or artistic writing, of the Japanese language. For a long time, the most esteemed calligrapher in Japan
Japan
had been Wang Xizhi, a Chinese calligrapher
Chinese calligrapher
in the 4th century, but after the invention of Hiragana
Hiragana
and Katakana, the Japanese unique syllabaries, the distinctive Japanese writing system
Japanese writing system
developed and calligraphers produced styles intrinsic to Japan
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Shiga Prefecture
Shiga Prefecture
Shiga Prefecture
(滋賀県, Shiga-ken) is a prefecture of Japan, which forms part of the Kansai region
Kansai region
in the western part of Honshu island.[1] It encircles Lake Biwa, the largest freshwater lake in Japan. The capital is Ōtsu.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Municipalities3.1 Cities 3.2 Towns 3.3 Mergers4 Politics 5 Economy 6 Demographics 7 Culture7.1 Cuisine 7.2 Mass media 7.3 Education 7.4 Sports8 Tourism 9 Transportation9.1 Railways 9.2 Roads 9.3 Boats10 Notable people from Shiga Prefecture 11 Sister states 12 Notes 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Historic Sites of Shiga Prefecture Shiga was known as Ōmi Province
Ōmi Province
or Gōshū before the prefectural system was established.[3] Omi was a neighbor of Nara and Kyoto, at the junction of western and eastern Japan
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Hiyoshi Shrine
Hiyoshi Taisha (日吉大社, the same characters can be pronounced as Hie Taisha) is a Shinto shrine located in Ōtsu, Shiga, Japan. This shrine is one of the Twenty-Two Shrines. Hiyoshi Shrine (日吉大社, Hiyoshi taisha), also known as Hiyoshi jinja (日吉神社) or Hie jinja. The West Hall of Worship (西本宮,, nishi hon-gū) and the East Hall of Worship (東本宮,, higashi hon-gū) have been designated by the Agency for Cultural Affairs as National Treasures in the category shrines.[1] This shrine heads the seventh largest shrine network in Japan, at about 4,000 shrines.Contents1 Enshrined gods 2 History 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEnshrined gods[edit]Ōnamuchi ŌyamakuiHistory[edit] Hiyoshi Taisha was first recorded in Kojiki, written in the 8th century. In the Middle Ages, the Enryaku-ji temple influenced the shrine to include some Buddhist essence. The buildings of the shrine were burnt when Oda Nobunaga destroyed Enryaku-ji in 1571
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day
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Polymath
A polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much,"[1] Latin: homo universalis, "universal man"[citation needed]) is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas—such a person is known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. In Western Europe, the first work to use polymathy in its title (De Polymathia tractatio: integri operis de studiis veterum) was published in 1603 by Johann von Wower, a Hamburg philosopher.[2][3][4][5] Wower defined polymathy as "knowledge of various matters, drawn from all kinds of studies [...] ranging freely through all the fields of the disciplines, as far as the human mind, with unwearied industry, is able to pursue them".[3] Wower lists erudition, literature, philology, philomathy and polyhistory as synonyms
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Jigoro Kano
Kano
Kano
is the state capital of Kano State
Kano State
in North West, Nigeria. It is situated in the Sahelian
Sahelian
geographic region, south of the Sahara. Kano is the commercial nerve centre of Northern Nigeria
Nigeria
and is the second largest city in Nigeria. The Kano
Kano
metropolis initially covered 137 square kilometres (53 square miles), and comprised six local government areas (LGAs) — Kano
Kano
Municipal, Fagge, Dala, Gwale, Tarauni
Tarauni
and Nasarawa; However, it now covers two additional LGAs — Ungogo
Ungogo
and Kumbotso. The total area of Metropolitan Kano
Kano
is now 499 square kilometres (193 square miles), with a population of 2,828,861 as of the 2006 Nigerian census. The principal inhabitants of the city are the Hausa people
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