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Judith Butler
Judith Butler
Judith Butler
FBA (born February 24, 1956) is an American philosopher and gender theorist whose work has influenced political philosophy, ethics and the fields of third-wave feminist, queer[2] and literary theory.[3] Since 1993, she has taught at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is now Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program of Critical Theory
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Cleveland, Ohio
Cleveland
Cleveland
(/ˈkliːvlənd/ KLEEV-lənd) is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County,[7] the state's second most-populous county.[8][9] Located along Lake Erie, the city proper has a population of 388,072, making Cleveland
Cleveland
the 51st largest city in the United States,[5] and the second-largest city in Ohio
Ohio
after Columbus.[10][11] Greater Cleveland
Greater Cleveland
ranked as the 32nd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with 2,055,612 people in 2016.[12] The city anchors the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 3,515,646 in 2010 and ranks 15th in the United States. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, approximately 60 miles (100 kilometers) west of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
state border
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Third-wave Feminism
Third-wave feminism
Third-wave feminism
is an iteration of the Feminist Movement that began in the early 1990s United States
United States
[2] and continued until the fourth wave began around 2012.[3][4] Born in the 1960s and 1970s as members of Generation X, and gro
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Discourse
Discourse
Discourse
(from Latin
Latin
discursus, "running to and from") denotes written and spoken communications:In semantics and discourse analysis: D
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Embodied Cognition
Embodied cognition
Embodied cognition
is the theory that many features of cognition, whether human or otherwise, are shaped by aspects of the entire body of the organism. The features of cognition include high level mental constructs (such as concepts and categories) and performance on various cognitive tasks (such as reasoning or judgment). The aspects of the body include the motor system, the perceptual system, bodily interactions with the environment (situatedness) and the assumptions about the world that are built into the structure of the organism. The embodied mind thesis challenges other theories, such as cognitivism, computationalism, and Cartesian dualism.[1][2] It is closely related to the extended mind thesis, situated cognition and enactivism
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Monique Wittig
Monique Wittig
Monique Wittig
(French: [vitig]; July 13, 1935 – January 3, 2003) was a French author and feminist theorist[1] who wrote about overcoming socially enforced gender roles and who coined the phrase "heterosexual contract". She published her first novel, L'Opoponax, in 1964. Her second novel, Les Guérillères
Les Guérillères
(1969), was a landmark in lesbian feminism.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Writing style 3 The Straight Mind 4 Theoretical views4.1 Criticism of Marxist theory 4.2 Linguistics5 Les Guérillères 6 Cultural references 7 Bibliography7.1 Novels 7.2 Plays 7.3 Short fiction 7.4 Translations 7.5 Essays and criticisms8 See also 9 References 10 External linksBiography[edit] Monique Wittig
Monique Wittig
was born in 1935 in Dannemarie in Haut-Rhin, France. In 1950 she moved to Paris
Paris
to study at the Sorbonne
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Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Freud
(/frɔɪd/ FROYD;[3] German: [ˈziːkmʊnt ˈfʁɔʏt]; born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.[4] Freud
Freud
was born to Galician Jewish
Jewish
parents in the Moravian town of Freiberg, in the Austrian Empire. He qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1881 at the University of Vienna.[5][6] Upon completing his habilitation in 1885, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology and became an affiliated professor in 1902.[7] Freud
Freud
lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886. In 1938 Freud
Freud
left Austria to escape the Nazis
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Susan Stryker
Lambda Literary Award[1] San Francisco / Northern California Emmy Award[2]Websitegws.arizona.edu/user/161Susan O'Neal Stryker is an American professor, author, filmmaker, and theorist whose work focuses on gender and human sexuality. She is associate professor of Gender and Women's Studies, director of the Institute for LGBT Studies, and founder of the Transgender Studies Initiative at the University of Arizona. She is the author of several books about LGBT history and culture.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Publications3.1 Books 3.2 Film and video 3.3 Articles, essays, and scholarly papers4 Bibliography 5 Filmography 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Stryker received a bachelor's degree in Letters from University of Oklahoma in 1983. She earned a Ph.D
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Sandy Stone (artist)
Allucquére Rosanne "Sandy" Stone (born c. 1936[1]) is an American academic theorist, media theorist, author, and performance artist. She is currently Associate Professor and Founding Director of the Advanced Communication Technologies Laboratory (ACTLab) and the New Media Initiative in the department of Radio-TV-Film at the University of Texas at Austin. Concurrently she is Wolfgang Kohler Professor of Media and Performance at the European Graduate School EGS,[2] senior artist at the Banff Centre, and Humanities Research Institute Fellow at the University of California, Irvine. Stone has worked in and written about film, music, experimental neurology, writing, engineering, and computer programming. Stone is transgender and is considered a founder of the academic discipline of transgender studies
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Jasbir Puar
Jasbir K. Puar is a U.S.-based queer theorist who currently works as an associate professor in the Department of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University.[2][3] Puar is author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times.[2] She has written widely on South Asian disaporic cultural production in the United States, United Kingdom and Trinidad, LGBT tourism, terrorism studies, surveillance studies, biopolitics and necropolitics, disability and debilitation, theories of intersectionality, affect, and assemblage; animal studies and posthumanism, homonationalism, pinkwashing, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine.Contents1 Academic career 2 View on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict 3 Works 4 Awards 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksAcademic career[edit] Puar has an M.A. in Women's Studies from the University of York and completed her Ph.D
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Andrea Smith (academic)
Andrea Lee Smith is an American academic, feminist, and activist against violence. Smith's work focuses on issues of violence against women of color and their communities, specifically Native American women. A co-founder of INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence, the Boarding School Healing Project, and the Chicago chapter of Women of All Red Nations, Smith has based her activism and her scholarship on the lives of women of color and long claimed to be Cherokee
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Psychoanalysis
Psychoanalysis
Psychoanalysis
is a set of theories and therapeutic techniques[1] related to the study of the unconscious mind,[2] which together form a method of treatment for mental-health disorders. The discipline was established in the early 1890s by Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud and stemmed partly from the clinical work of Josef Breuer
Josef Breuer
and others. Freud
Freud
first used the term psychoanalysis (in French) in 1896
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Western Philosophy
Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is the philosophical thought and work of the Western world. Historically, the term refers to the philosophical thinking of Western culture, beginning with Greek philosophy
Greek philosophy
of the Pre-Socratics such as Thales
Thales
(c. 624 – c. 546 BC) and Pythagoras (c. 570 BC – c. 495 BC), and eventually covering a large area of the globe.[1][2] The word philosophy itself originated from the Ancient Greek: philosophia (φιλοσοφία), literally, "the love of wisdom" (φιλεῖν philein, "to love" and σοφία sophia, "wisdom"). The scope of philosophy in the ancient understanding, and the writings of (at least some of) the ancient philosophers, were all intellectual endeavors
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21st-century Philosophy
Contemporary philosophy
Contemporary philosophy
is the present period in the history of Western philosophy
Western philosophy
beginning at the end of the 19th century with the professionalization of the discipline and the rise of analytic and continental philosophy. The phrase "contemporary philosophy" is a piece of technical terminology in philosophy that refers to a specific period in the history of Western philosophy
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20th-century Philosophy
20th-century philosophy
20th-century philosophy
saw the development of a number of new philosophical schools— including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and poststructuralism. In terms of the eras of philosophy, it is usually labelled as contemporary philosophy (succeeding modern philosophy, which runs roughly from the time of Descartes until the twentieth-century). As with other academic disciplines, philosophy increasingly became professionalized in the twentieth century, and a split emerged between philosophers who considered themselves part of either the "analytic" or "continental" traditions
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