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Judge Mathis
Brian Wayy Roy ShakkedCountry of origin United StatesOriginal language(s) EnglishNo. of seasons 19No. of episodes 2,000ProductionLocation(s) NBC Tower Chicago, IllinoisCamera setup MultipleRunning time 42 minutesProduction company(s) Telepictures
Telepictures
Productions Black Pearl Entertainment (1999-2002) (seasons 1-3)Distributor Warner Bros
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Verdict
In law, a verdict is the formal finding of fact made by a jury on matters or questions submitted to the jury by a judge.[1] In a bench trial, the judge's decision near the end of the trial is simply referred to as a finding.[2] In England and Wales, a coroner's findings are called verdicts (see Coroner § Verdict).Contents1 Etymology 2 Criminal law 3 Compromise verdict 4 Directed verdict 5 General verdict 6 Sealed verdict 7 Special
Special
verdict 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The term "verdict", from the
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G.E.D.
General Equivalency Development or General Equivalency Diploma (GED)[1] tests are a group of four subject tests which, when passed, provide certification that the test taker has United States
United States
or Canadian high school-level academic skills. The American Council on Education (ACE), in Washington, D.C. (U.S.), which owns the GED trademark, coined the initialism to identify "tests of general equivalency development" that measure proficiency in science, mathematics, social studies, reading, and writing. Passing the GED test gives those who do not complete high school, or who do not meet requirements for high school diploma, the opportunity to earn their high school equivalency credential, also called a high school equivalency development or general equivalency diploma
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Role Model
A role model is a person whose behavior, example, or success is or can be emulated by others, especially by younger people.[1] The term "role model" is credited to sociologist Robert K. Merton, who coined the phrase during his career.[2][3] Merton hypothesized that individuals compare themselves with reference groups of people who occupy the social role to which the individual aspires.[4] An example being the way young fans will idolize and imitate professional athletes or entertainment artists. In the second half of the twentieth century, U.S. advocates for workplace equity popularized the term and concept of role models as part of a larger social capital lexicon—which also includes terms such as glass ceiling, networking, mentoring, and gatekeeper—serving to identify and address the problems barring non-dominant groups from professional success
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Documentary
A documentary film is a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspect of reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction, education, or maintaining a historical record.[1] Such films were originally shot on film stock—the only medium available—but now include video and digital productions that can be either direct-to-video, made into a TV show, or released for screening in cinemas
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Gang
A gang is a group of friends or members of a family with a defined leadership and internal organization that identifies with or claims control over territory in a community and engages, either individually or collectively, in illegal, and possibly violent, behavior. Some criminal gang members are "jumped in" (by going through a process of initiation), or they have to prove their loyalty and right to belong by committing certain acts, usually theft or violence
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Dropping Out
Dropping out
Dropping out
means leaving high school, college, university or another group for practical reasons, necessities, or disillusionment with the system from which the individual in question leaves.Contents1 Canada 2 United Kingdom 3 United States 4 Australia 5 Latin America 6 Dropout recovery 7 Attrition 8 Prevention8.1 Family dynamics 8.2 Religious participation9 See also 10 Sources 11 ReferencesCanada[edit] In Canada, most individuals graduate grade 12 by the age of 18, according to Jason Gilmore who collects data of employment and education using the Labour Force Survey. The LFS is the official survey used to collect unemployment data in Canada (2010). Using this tool, assessing educational attainment and school attendance can calculate a dropout rate (Gilmore, 2010). It was found by the LFS that by 2009, 1 in 12 20-24-year-old adults did not have a high school diploma (Gilmore, 2010)
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Prison
A prison,[a] also known as a correctional facility, jail,[b] gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center[c] (American English) or remand center[d] is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state. Prisons are most commonly used within a criminal justice system: people charged with crimes may be imprisoned until they are brought to trial; those pleading or being found guilty of crimes at trial may be sentenced to a specified period of imprisonment. Besides their use for punishing crimes, jails and prisons are frequently used by authoritarian regimes against perceived opponents. In American English, prison and jail are often treated as having separate definitions. The term prison or penitentiary tends to describe institutions that incarcerate people for longer periods of time, such as many years, and are operated by the state or federal governments
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Heroin
Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names,[1] is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects.[2] Medically it is used in several countries to relieve pain or in opioid replacement therapy.[7][8][9] Heroin
Heroin
is typically injected, usually into a vein; however, it can also be smoked, snorted or inhaled.[2][10][11] Onset of effects is usually rapid and lasts for a few hours.[2] Common side effects include respiratory depression (decreased breathing), dry mouth, euphoria, and addiction.[10] Other side effects can include abscesses, infected heart valves, blood born
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Illegal Drug Trade
The illegal drug trade is a global black market dedicated to the cultivation, manufacture, distribution and sale of drugs that are subject to drug prohibition laws. Most jurisdictions prohibit trade, except under license, of many types of drugs through the use of drug prohibition laws. The United Nations
United Nations
Office on Drugs and Crime's World Drug
Drug
Report 2005 estimates the size of the global illicit drug market at US$321.6 billion in 2003.[1] With a world GDP of US$36 trillion in the same year, the illegal drug trade may be estimated as nearly 1% of total global trade
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Ultimatum
An ultimatum (Latin: the last one) is a demand whose fulfillment is requested in a specified period of time and which is backed up by a threat to be followed through in case of noncompliance. An ultimatum is generally the final demand in a series of requests. As such, the time allotted is usually short, and the request is understood not to be open to further negotiation. The threat which backs up the ultimatum can vary depending on the demand in question and on the other circumstances.[citation needed] The word is used in diplomacy to signify the final terms submitted by one of the parties in negotiation for settlement of any subject of disagreement. It is accompanied by an intimation as to how refusal will be regarded. English diplomacy has devised the adroit reservation that refusal will be regarded as an "unfriendly act", a phrase which serves as a warning that the consequences of the rupture of negotiations will be considered from the point of view of forcing a settlement
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Jail
A prison,[a] also known as a correctional facility, jail,[b] gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center[c] (American English) or remand center[d] is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state. Prisons are most commonly used within a criminal justice system: people charged with crimes may be imprisoned until they are brought to trial; those pleading or being found guilty of crimes at trial may be sentenced to a specified period of imprisonment. Besides their use for punishing crimes, jails and prisons are frequently used by authoritarian regimes against perceived opponents. In American English, prison and jail are often treated as having separate definitions. The term prison or penitentiary tends to describe institutions that incarcerate people for longer periods of time, such as many years, and are operated by the state or federal governments
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Tort Law
A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong[1] that causes someone else to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act. The person who commits the act is called a tortfeasor. Although crimes may be torts, the cause of legal action is not necessarily a crime, as the harm may be due to negligence which does not amount to criminal negligence. The victim of the harm can recover their loss as damages in a lawsuit. In order to prevail, the plaintiff in the lawsuit, commonly referred to as the injured party, must show that the actions or lack of action was the legally recognizable cause of the harm. The equivalent of tort in civil law jurisdictions is delict. Legal injuries are not limited to physical injuries and may include emotional, economic, or reputational injuries as well as violations of privacy, property, or constitutional rights
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Cancer
Cancer
Cancer
is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.[2][8] These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread to other parts of the body.[8] Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, and a change in bowel movements.[1] While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes.[1] Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.[8]
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Bar Examination
A bar examination is a test intended to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given jurisdiction.Contents1 Brazil 2 Canada 3 People's Republic of China 4 England and Wales 5 France 6 Germany 7 Ghana 8 Hungary 9 Ireland 10 Iran 11 Japan 12 Korea (South) 13 Malaysia 14 Philippines 15 Poland 16 Singapore 17 South Africa 18 Thailand 19 United States19.1 When exams occur19.1.1 Preparation for the exam19.2 Multistate standardized examinations19.2.1 Uniform Bar Examination (UBE) 19.2.2 Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)19.2.2.1 Description 19.2.2.2 Average scores 19.2.2.3 Transfer of MBE scores19.2.3 Multistate
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