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Joshua
Joshua
Joshua
(/ˈdʒɒʃuə/) or Jehoshua (Hebrew: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‬ Yehōšuʿa)[a] is the central figure in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible's Book of Joshua. According to the books of Exodus, Numbers and Joshua, he was Moses' assistant and became the leader of the Israelite
Israelite
tribes after the death of Moses.[3] His name was Hoshe'a (הוֹשֵׁעַ) the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, but Moses
Moses
called him Joshua
Joshua
(Numbers 13:16), the name by which he is commonly known. The name is shortened to Yeshua in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:17)
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Saint Symbolism
Christianity
Christianity
has used symbolism from its very beginnings.[1] Each saint has a story and a reason why he or she led an exemplary life. Symbols have been used to tell these stories throughout the history of the Church. A number of Christian saints are traditionally represented by a symbol or iconic motif associated with their life, termed an attribute or emblem, in order to identify them. The study of these forms part of iconography in art history. They were particularly used so that the illiterate could recognize a scene, and to give each of the Saints something of a personality in art. They are often carried in the hand by the Saint. Attributes often vary with either time or geography, especially between Eastern Christianity
Christianity
and the West. Orthodox images more often contained inscriptions with the names of saints, so the Eastern repertoire of attributes is generally smaller than the Western
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Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic, monotheistic, universal religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Arabic: Allah), and that
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Eastern Orthodox Church
Autocephaly
Autocephaly
recognized universally de facto, by some Autocephalous Churches de jure. Canonicity mostly recognized:AmericaPartially recognized autocephaly by Constantinople
Constantinople
and the Church of Greece
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Nun (Bible)
A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery.[1] While in common usage the terms nun and religious sister are often used interchangeably, they represent different forms of religious life; nuns are historically associated with living an ascetic life of prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent, while religious sisters are devoted to an active vocation of prayer and charitable works in areas such as education and healthcare. Communities of nuns or religious sisters exist in numerous religious traditions, including Christianity, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Hinduism. In the Buddhist tradition, female monastics are known as Bhikkhuni, and take additional vows, compared to male monastics (bhikkhus); they are most common in Mahayana Buddhism, but have more recently become more prevalent in other traditions
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Roman Catholicism
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Armenian Apostolic Church
The Armenian Apostolic Church
Armenian Apostolic Church
(Armenian: Հայ Առաքելական Եկեղեցի, romanized: Hay Aṙak'elakan Yekeghetsi)[note 1] is the national church of the Armenian people. Part of Oriental Orthodoxy, it is one of the most ancient Christian communities.[4] The Kingdom of Armenia
Armenia
was the first state to adopt Christianity
Christianity
as its official religion under the rule of King Tiridates in the early 4th century.[5][6] According to tradition, the church originated in the missions of Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus in the 1st century. It is sometimes referred to as the Armenian Orthodox Church or Gregorian Church. The latter is not preferred by the church itself, as it views the Apostles
Apostles
Bartholomew and Thaddeus as its founders, and St
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Calendar Of Saints
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Shrine
A shrine (Latin: scrinium "case or chest for books or papers"; Old French: escrin "box or case")[1] is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon, or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated.[2] A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world's religions, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese folk religion, Shinto, and Asatru as well as in secular and non-religious settings such as a war memorial
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Christianity
Christianity
Christianity
is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth. Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus
Jesus
is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.[1] It is the world's largest religion with about 2.4 billion followers.[2] Christianity
Christianity
began as a Second Temple Judaic sect in the 1st century in the Roman province
Roman province
of Judea. Jesus' apostles and their followers spread around Syria, the Levant, Europe, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Transcaucasia, Egypt, and Ethiopia, despite initial persecution
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Tola (Bible)
Tola may refer to:Look up tola in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 Places 2 Other uses 3 Given name 4 SurnamePlaces[edit]Bella Tola, a mountain in the Pennine Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais La Tola, a town and municipality in the Nariño Department, Colombia Pela Tola, a Village in Pakistan Tola, Rivas, a municipality in Nicaragua Tuul River, also Tola River, in MongoliaOther uses[edit] Tola (unit), Indian unit of mass
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New Kingdom Of Egypt
The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties of Egypt. Radiocarbon dating places the exact beginning of the New Kingdom between 1570 BC and 1544 BC.[1] The New Kingdom followed the Second Intermediate Period and was succeeded by the Third Intermediate Period. It was Egypt's most prosperous time and marked the peak of its power.[2] The later part of this period, under the 19th and 20th Dynasties (1292–1069 BC), is also known as the Ramesside period
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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(/lɔːs ˈændʒələs/ (listen);[a] Spanish: Los Ángeles; Spanish for "The Angels"),[16] officially the City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California; the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City; and the third-most populous city in North America, after Mexico City
Mexico City
and New York City. With an estimated population of nearly four million people,[11] Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood, the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles
Los Angeles
lies in a basin, adjacent to the Pacific Ocean, with mountains as high as 10,000 feet (3,000 m), and deserts
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J. Paul Getty Museum
The J. Paul Getty
J. Paul Getty
Museum, commonly referred to as the Getty, is an art museum in California
California
housed on two campuses: the Getty Center
Getty Center
and Getty Villa. The two locations received over two million visitors in 2016.[1] The Getty Center
Getty Center
is in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles and is the primary location of the museum. The collection features Western art from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the present. The museum's second location, the Getty Villa, is in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood (though self-claims in the city of Malibu[2]) and displays art from ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria.[3]Contents1 History 2 GettyGuide 3 The controversies with Italy
Italy
and Greece 4 Selected collection highlights 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In 1974, J
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Giovanni Lanfranco
Giovanni Lanfranco
Giovanni Lanfranco
(26 January 1582 – 30 November 1647) was an Italian painter of the Baroque
Baroque
period.Contents1 Biography 2 Independent work 3 Return to Rome 4 Legacy and critical assessment 5 Selected works 6 Sources 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Giovanni Gaspare Lanfranco was born in Parma, the third son of Stefano and Cornelia Lanfranchi, and was placed as a page in the household of Count Orazio Scotti.[1] His talent for drawing allowed him to begin an apprenticeship with the Bolognese artist Agostino Carracci, brother of Annibale Carracci, working alongside fellow Parmese Sisto Badalocchio in the local Farnese palaces. When Agostino died in 1602, both young artists moved to Annibale's large and prominent Roman workshop, which was then involved in working on the Galleria Farnese in the Palazzo Farnese gallery ceiling
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