HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Joseph Vaz
St. Joseph Vaz, CO, (Konkani: Sant Zuze Vaz; Portuguese: São José Vaz; Tamil: புனித யோசப் வாஸ் Punidha Yosap Vaz; Sinhalese: ශාන්ත ජුසේ වාස් මුනිතුමා, ලංකා අපොස්තුළුවරයා Santha Juse Vaz Piyathuma, Lanka Aposthuluvaraya), (21 April 1651 – 16 January 1711) was an Oratorian priest and missionary in Sri Lanka, then known as Ceylon. Vaz arrived in Ceylon during the Dutch occupation, when the Dutch were imposing Calvinism
Calvinism
as the official religion after taking over from the Portuguese. He travelled throughout the island bringing the Eucharist and the sacraments to clandestine groups of Catholics. Later in his mission, he found shelter in the Kingdom of Kandy
Kandy
where he was able to work freely
[...More...]

"Joseph Vaz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mary, The Mother Of Jesus
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
[...More...]

"Mary, The Mother Of Jesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Society Of Jesus
The Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(SJ – from Latin: Societas Iesu) is a scholarly religious congregation of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
which originated in sixteenth-century Spain. The members are called Jesuits.[2] The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations on six continents. Jesuits
Jesuits
work in education (founding schools, colleges, universities, and seminaries), intellectual research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits
Jesuits
also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue. Ignatius of Loyola, a Basque nobleman from the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
area of northern Spain, founded the society after discerning his spiritual vocation while recovering from a wound sustained in the Battle of Pamplona
[...More...]

"Society Of Jesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
[...More...]

"Eucharist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sacraments Of The Catholic Church
There are seven sacraments of the Catholic Church, which according to Catholic theology
Catholic theology
were instituted by Jesus
Jesus
and entrusted to the Church. Sacraments are visible rites seen as signs and efficacious channels of the grace of God to all those who receive them with the proper disposition
[...More...]

"Sacraments Of The Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sancoale
Sancoale is a census town in South Goa district in the Indian state of Goa. This village once housed the Hindu Saraswat Brahmin deities Lakshmi Narasimha, Shantadurga Shankhvaleshwai and Vijayadurga. Around 1560, the deities were shifted to Veling and Kerim (Ponda) during the Portuguese inquisition.The main attraction of this village is st.joseph vaz church.The village now is a home of many christians and hindus.Hindu from different villages are settled here the first Hindus who migrated here were Hindu saraswat brahmin from kavlem in 1850s They migrated from there to find work for fullfilling their daily needs.The family dety worshiped by this family is kamakshi.this family now resides at jina a place in sancoale. Geography[edit] Sancoale is located at .[1] It has an average elevation of 41 metres (135 feet). Demographics[edit] As of 2011 Indian census, Sancoale had a population of 21,923. Males constitute 53% of the population and females 47%
[...More...]

"Sancoale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parish Church
A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity
Christianity
is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe
Europe
have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.Contents1 Role 2 By denomination 3 Protestant resurgence 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingRole[edit] In England, it is the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. Nearly every part of England
England
is in a parish, and most parishes have an Anglican parish church, which is consecrated
[...More...]

"Parish Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Portuguese Language
Argentina
Argentina
(South America) Indonesia
Indonesia
(Asia)[4][5] Senegal
Senegal
(Africa) South Africa
Africa
(Africa) Namibia
Namibia
(Africa) Uruguay
Uruguay
(South America)[6][7][8]Numerous international organisationsRegulated by International Portuguese Language Institute Academia Brasileira de Letras (Brazil) Academia das Ciências de Lisboa, Classe de Letras (Portugal) Academia Galega da Língua Portuguesa (Galicia) CPLPLanguage codesISO 639-1 ptISO 639-2 porISO 639-3 porGlottolog port1283[9]Linguasphere 51-AAA-a  Native language   Official and administrative language   Cultural or secondary language   Portuguese speaking minorities   Portuguese-based creole languagesThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols
[...More...]

"Portuguese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Velha Goa
Old Goa (Konkani: Pornnem Goem, Adlem Gõi, Goeam) or Velha Goa (Velha means "old" in Portuguese) is a historical city in North Goa district in the Indian state of Goa. The city was constructed by the Bijapur Sultanate in the 15th century and served as capital of Portuguese India from the 16th century until its abandonment in the 18th century due to a plague. Under the Portuguese, it is said to have once been a city of nearly 200,000 wherefrom, before the plague, the Portuguese traded across continents. The remains of the city are a UNESCO World Heritage Site
[...More...]

"Velha Goa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhetoric
Rhetoric
Rhetoric
is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade or motivate particular audiences in specific situations. It can also be in a visual form; as a subject of formal study and a productive civic practice, rhetoric has played a central role in the European tradition.[1] Its best known definition comes from Aristotle, who considers it a counterpart of both logic and politics, and calls it "the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion."[2] Rhetoric
Rhetoric
typically provides heuristics for understanding, discovering, and developing arguments for particular situations, such as Aristotle's three persuasive audience appeals, logos, pathos, and ethos. The five canons of rhetoric, which trace the traditional tasks in designing a persuasive speech, were first codified in classical Rome: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery
[...More...]

"Rhetoric" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humanities
Humanities
Humanities
are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture. In the renaissance, the term contrasted with divinity and referred to what is now called classics, the main area of secular study in universities at the time
[...More...]

"Humanities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
[...More...]

"Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dutch Colonial Empire
Light green: territories administered by or originating from territories administered by the Dutch East India Company Dark green: territories administered by or originating from territories administered by the Dutch West India Company. Tiny orange squares indicate smaller trading posts, the so-called handelsposten.Membership28 countries Colonies:  Netherlands  Belgium  Brazil  Ivory Coast  French Guiana  Ghana  Guyana  India  Indonesia  Luxembourg  Mauritius  United States  South Africa  Sri Lanka  Taiwan  Suriname Trading Posts:  Angola  Australia  Bangladesh  Canada  Chile  China  Japan  Kuwait  Malaysia  Morocco  Namibia  São Tomé and Príncipe  Senegal  Thailand  YemenThe Dutch Empire (Dutch: Het Nederlandse Koloniale Rijk) comprised the overseas colonies, enclaves, and outposts controlled and administered
[...More...]

"Dutch Colonial Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
[...More...]

"Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dominican Order
The Order of Preachers (Latin: Ordo Praedicatorum, postnominal abbreviation O.P.), also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III
Pope Honorius III
via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam
Religiosam vitam
on 22 December 1216. Members of the order, who are referred to as Dominicans, generally carry the letters O.P. after their names, standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers
[...More...]

"Dominican Order" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.