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Jorvik Viking Centre
The Jorvik Viking
Viking
Centre is a museum and visitor attraction in York, England, containing lifelike mannequins and life-size dioramas depicting Viking
Viking
life in the city. It was created by the York Archaeological Trust in 1984. Its name is derived from Jórvík, the Old Norse
Old Norse
name for the city of York.Contents1 Background 2 Today2.1 Jorvik Viking
Viking
models 2.2 Viking
Viking
Festival 2.3 "Time Warp" experience 2.4 2015 flood damage3 Public response3.1 Criticisms4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit]Under a glass floor, the original archeological dig is reproduced with actual timbersCravens, a firm of confectioners was founded in 1803
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Norse Mythology
Norse mythology
Norse mythology
is the body of myths of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism
Norse paganism
and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore
Scandinavian folklore
of the modern period
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Fish Market
A fish market is a marketplace for selling fish products. It can be dedicated to wholesale trade between fishermen and fish merchants, or to the sale of seafood to individual consumers, or to both
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Latrine
A latrine is a toilet or an even simpler facility which is used as a toilet within a sanitation system
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Yorkshire Museum
The Yorkshire Museum
Yorkshire Museum
is a museum in York, England
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Graham Ibbeson
Graham Ibbeson is an artist and sculptor resident of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England. He has created bronze sculptures in towns and cities across Britain including Leeds, Cardiff, Dover, Barnsley, Doncaster, Northampton, Chesterfield, Middlesbrough, Perth, Otley and Rugby. One his most famous pieces is the statue of comedian Eric Morecambe, which stands in the performer’s seaside hometown of Morecambe, Lancashire and which was unveiled by the Queen. His bronze statue of Cary Grant was unveiled in 2001 in Millennium Square in Grant's hometown of Bristol.[1] Ibbeson has also sculpted comedy duo Laurel and Hardy; the bronze statue was erected in Laurel's home town of Ulverston April 2009.[2] His latest commission is a statue of Benny Hill for the comedian's hometown of Southampton.[3] References[edit]^ "Bristol celebrates Hollywood 'son'". BBC News. 8 December 2001.  ^ "Laurel and Hardy statue prompts call for a halt to UK's local hero bronzes". London: The Guardian
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Forensic Facial Reconstruction
Forensic
Forensic
facial reconstruction (or forensic facial approximation) is the process of recreating the face of an individual (whose identity is often not known) from their skeletal remains through an amalgamation of artistry, forensic science, anthropology, osteology, and anatomy. It is easily the most subjective—as well as one of the most controversial—techniques in the field of forensic anthropology. Despite this controversy, facial reconstruction has proved successful frequently enough that research and methodological developments continue to be advanced. In addition to remains involved in
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Saxon
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
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Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
(/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature,[1] is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner
Poets' Corner
of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Legend of Good Women and Troilus
Troilus
and Criseyde
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Storm Desmond
Storm Desmond
Storm Desmond
was an extratropical cyclone and fourth named storm of the 2015–16 UK and Ireland windstorm season, notable for directing a plume of moist air, known as an atmospheric river,[1][8] which brought record amounts of orographic rainfall to upland areas of northern Atlantic Europe
Atlantic Europe
and subsequent major floods.[9] In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the worst affected areas were centred on Cumbria, parts of Lancashire
Lancashire
and the Scottish Borders. In Ireland the worst affected areas were in the Shannon River Basin
Shannon River Basin
in the west and Irish midlands.[10] The extent of damage caused in such a short period across wide areas brought into focus the performance of UK central government flood defence strategies
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2012 Phenomenon
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t eA date inscription in the Maya Long Count
Maya Long Count
on the east side of Stela C from Quirigua
Quirigua
showing the date for the last Creation. It is read as 13.0.0.0.0 4 Ajaw 8 Cumku and is usually correlated as 11 or 13 August, 3114 BC on the Proleptic Gregorian calendar
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Museum
A museum (/mjuːˈziːəm/ mew-ZEE-əm; plural musea or museums) is an institution that cares for (conserves) a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. Many public museums make these items available for public viewing through exhibits that may be permanent or temporary.[1] The largest museums are located in major cities throughout the world, while thousands of local museums exist in smaller cities, towns and rural areas. Museums have varying aims, ranging from serving researchers and specialists to serving the general public
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Ottawa Citizen
The Ottawa
Ottawa
Citizen is an English-language daily newspaper owned by Postmedia Network
Postmedia Network
in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Contents1 Circulation 2 History 3 Sections3.1 Daily 3.2 Weekly4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksCirculation[edit] Like most Canadian daily newspapers , the Ottawa
Ottawa
Citizen has seen a decline in circulation. Its total circulation dropped by 26 percent to 91,796 copies daily from 2009 to 2015.[2]Daily average[3]25,00050,00075,000100,000125,000150,0002009201020112012201320142015History[edit]Former logo.Established as The Bytown Packet in 1845 by William Harris, it was renamed the Citizen in 1851. The newspaper's original motto, which has recently been returned to the editorial page, was Fair play and Day-Light. The paper has been through a number of owners. In 1846, Harris sold the paper to John Bell and Henry J. Friel
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Daily Mail
Northcliffe House 2 Derry Street London W8 5TTCirculation 1,383,932 (as of November 2017)[1]ISSN 0307-7578 OCLC
OCLC
number 16310567Website www.dailymail.co.ukThe Daily Mail
Daily Mail
is a British daily middle-market[2][3] tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust[4] and published in London. It is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun.[5] Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday
The Mail on Sunday
was launched in 1982 while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively
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