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Joris Ivens
Georg Henri Anton "Joris" Ivens (18 November 1898 – 28 June 1989) was a Dutch documentary filmmaker. Among the notable films he directed or co-directed are A Tale of the Wind, The Spanish Earth, Rain, ...A Valparaiso, Misère au Borinage (Borinage), 17th Parallel: Vietnam in War, The Seine Meets Paris, Far from Vietnam, Pour le Mistral and How Yukong Moved the Mountains.Contents1 Early life and career 2 U.S. and World War II-era career 3 Return to Europe 4 Filmography 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born Georg Henri Anton Ivens[1] into a wealthy family, Ivens went to work in one of his father's photo supply shops and from there developed an interest in film. Under the direction of his father, he completed his first film at 13; in college he studied economics with the goal of continuing his father's business, but an interest in class issues distracted him from that path
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Nijmegen
Nijmegen
Nijmegen
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈnɛimeːɣə(n)] ( listen);[6] Nijmeegs: Nimwegen [ˈnɪmβ̞ɛːxə]), historically anglicized as Nimeguen,[7] is a municipality and a city in the Dutch province of Gelderland
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Propaganda Film
A propaganda film is a film that involves some form of propaganda. Propaganda
Propaganda
films may be packaged in numerous ways, but are most often documentary-style productions or fictional screenplays, that are produced to convince the viewer of a specific political point or influence the opinions or behavior of the viewer, often by providing subjective content that may be deliberately misleading.[1] Propaganda
Propaganda
is the ability "to produce and spread fertile messages that, once sown, will germinate in large human cultures.”[2] However, in the 20th century, a “new” propaganda emerged, which revolved around political organizations and their need to communicate messages that would “sway relevant groups of people in order to accommodate their agendas”.[3] First developed by the Lumiere brothers in 1896, film provided a unique means of accessing large audiences at once
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Vsevolod Pudovkin
Vsevolod Illarionovich Pudovkin (Russian: Всеволод Илларионович Пудовкин, IPA: [ˈfsʲevələt ɪlərʲɪˈonəvʲɪt͡ɕ pʊˈdofkʲɪn]; 16 February 1893 – 30 June 1953)[1][2] was a Russian and Soviet film director, screenwriter and actor who developed influential theories of montage. Pudovkin's masterpieces are often contrasted with those of his contemporary Sergei Eisenstein, but whereas Eisenstein utilized montage to glorify the power of the masses, Pudovkin preferred to concentrate on the courage and resilience of individuals. He was granted the title of People's Artist of the USSR
People's Artist of the USSR
in 1948.Contents1 Biography 2 Filmography 3 Published works 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Vsevolod Pudovkin
Vsevolod Pudovkin
was born in Penza
Penza
into a Russian family, the third of six children
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Dziga Vertov
Dziga Vertov
Dziga Vertov
(Russian: Дзига Вертов; born David Abelevich Kaufman, Russian: Дави́д А́белевич Ка́уфман, and also known as Denis Kaufman; 2 January 1896 – 12 February 1954) was a Soviet pioneer documentary film and newsreel director, as well as a cinema theorist
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Magnitogorsk
Magnitogorsk
Magnitogorsk
(Russian: Магнитого́рск, IPA: [məɡnʲɪtɐˈɡorsk], lit. city near the magnetic mountain) is an industrial city in Chelyabinsk
Chelyabinsk
Oblast, Russia, located on the eastern side of the extreme southern extent of the Ural Mountains by the Ural River. Population: 407,775 (2010 Census);[2] 418,545 (2002 Census);[5] 440,321 (1989 Census).[6] It was named after the Magnitnaya Mountain, a geological anomaly that once consisted almost completely of iron ore, around 55% to 60% iron. It is the second largest city in Russia
Russia
that is not the administrative center of any federal subject or district. Magnitogorsk
Magnitogorsk
contains the largest iron and steel works in the country, Magnitogorsk
Magnitogorsk
Iron
Iron
and Steel
Steel
Works
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National Film Board Of Canada
The National Film Board of Canada
Canada
(or simply National Film Board or NFB) (French: Office national du film du Canada, or ONF) is Canada's public film and digital media producer and distributor. An agency of the Government of Canada, the NFB produces and distributes documentary films, animation, web documentaries and alternative dramas. In total, the NFB has produced over 13,000 productions which have won over 5,000 awards.[1] The NFB reports to the Parliament of Canada
Canada
through the Minister of Canadian Heritage
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Royal Canadian Navy
The Royal Canadian Navy
Navy
(RCN; French: Marine royale canadienne) is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the unified Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2017[update], Canada's navy operates 12 frigates, 4 patrol submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels and 8 unarmed patrol/training vessels, as well as several auxiliary vessels
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Battle Of The Atlantic
 Germany  Italy (1940–43)Commanders and leaders Martin E. Nasmith (1939–41) Sir Percy Noble (1941–42) Sir Max K. Horton (1943–45) Frederick Bowhill
Frederick Bowhill
(1939–41) Philip de la Ferté (1941–43) Sir John Slessor
John Slessor
(1943–45) Dudley Pound
Dudley Pound
(1939–43) Leonard W. Murray Ernest J. King Royal E
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Rural Electrification
Rural electrification
Rural electrification
is the process of bringing electrical power to rural and remote areas. Electricity is used not only for lighting and household purposes, but it also allows for mechanization of many farming operations, such as well-pumping, threshing, milking, and silo filling. In areas facing labor shortages, this allows for greater productivity at reduced cost. Electrification
Electrification
began in cities and towns and gradually extended to rural areas. An inherent challenge of extending electrical grids into the countryside is that doing so is expensive, but amortizing its capital cost well enough to sufficiently reduce the unit cost of each hook-up is harder to do in lightly populated areas (yielding higher per capita share of the expense)
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Fascism
Fascism
Fascism
(/ˈfæʃɪzəm/) is a form of radical authoritarian nationalism,[1][2] characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition and control of industry and commerce,[3] which came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe.[4] The first fascist movements emerged in Italy during World War I
World War I
before it spread to other European countries.[4] Opposed to liberalism, Marxism
Marxism
and anarchism, fascism is usually placed on the far-right within the traditional left–right spectrum.[5][6][7][4][8][9] Fascists saw World War I
World War I
as a revolution that brought massive changes to the nature of war, society, the state and technology. The advent of total war and the total mass mobilization of society had broken down the distinction between civilians and combatants
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Republican Faction (Spanish Civil War)
The Republican faction (Spanish: Bando republicano), also known as the Loyalist faction (Spanish: Bando leal or bando gubernamental), was the side in the Spanish Civil War
Spanish Civil War
of 1936 to 1939 that supported the established government of the Second Spanish Republic
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René Clair
René Clair
René Clair
(11 November 1898 – 15 March 1981) born René-Lucien Chomette, was a French filmmaker and writer. He first established his reputation in the 1920s as a director of silent films in which comedy was often mingled with fantasy. He went on to make some of the most innovative early sound films in France, before going abroad to work in the UK and USA for more than a decade. Returning to France after World War II, he continued to make films that were characterised by their elegance and wit, often presenting a nostalgic view of French life in earlier years
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Marc Blitzstein
Marcus Samuel Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 – January 22, 1964), was an American composer, lyricist, and librettist.[1] He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is known for The Cradle Will Rock
The Cradle Will Rock
and for his Off-Broadway translation/adaptation of The Threepenny Opera
The Threepenny Opera
by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. His works also include the opera Regina, an adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play The Little Foxes; the Broadway musical Juno, based on Seán O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock; and No for an Answer
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Virgil Thomson
Virgil Thomson
Virgil Thomson
(November 25, 1896 – September 30, 1989) was an American composer and critic. He was instrumental in the development of the "American Sound" in classical music. He has been described as a modernist,[1][2][3][4][5] a neoromantic,[6] a neoclassicist,[7] and a composer of "an Olympian blend of humanity and detachment"[8] whose "expressive voice was always carefully muted" until his late opera Lord Byron which, in contrast to all his previous work, exhibited an emotional content that rises to "moments of real passion".[9]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Later years 1.3 Awards and honors 1.4 Death2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Thomson was born in Kansas City, Missouri. As a child, he befriended Alice Smith, great-granddaughter of Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter-day Saint movement
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Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir
(French: [ʁənwaʁ]; 15 September 1894 – 12 February 1979) was a French film director, screenwriter, actor, producer and author. As a film director and actor, he made more than forty films from the silent era to the end of the 1960s. His films La Grande Illusion (1937) and The Rules of the Game
The Rules of the Game
(1939) are often cited by critics as among the greatest films ever made. He was ranked by the BFI's Sight & Sound poll of critics in 2002 as the fourth greatest director of all time. Among numerous honors accrued during his lifetime, he received a Lifetime Achievement Academy Award in 1975 for his contribution to the motion picture industry. Renoir was the son of the painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir
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