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Jordanes
Jordanes
Jordanes
(/dʒɔːrˈdeɪniːz/),[1] also written Jordanis or, uncommonly, Jornandes,[2] was a 6th-century Eastern Roman bureaucrat of Gothic extraction[3] who turned his hand to history later in life. Jordanes
Jordanes
wrote Romana, about the history of Rome, but his best-known work is his Getica, which was written in Constantinople
Constantinople
[4] about AD 551.[5] It is the only extant ancient work dealing with the early history of the Goths. Jordanes
Jordanes
was asked by a friend to write Getica
Getica
as a summary of a multi-volume history of the Goths
Goths
by the statesman Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
that had existed then but has since been lost
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Caracalla
Caracalla
Caracalla
(/ˌkærəˈkælə/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Severus Antoninus Augustus;[1] 4 April 188 – 8 April 217), formally known as Antoninus, was a Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from AD 198 to 217. A member of the Severan Dynasty, he was the eldest son of Septimius Severus
Septimius Severus
and Julia Domna. Caracalla
Caracalla
reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. Caracalla
Caracalla
then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta, with whom he had a fraught relationship, until he had Geta murdered later that year
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Monk
A monk (/mʌŋk/, from Greek: μοναχός, monachos, "single, solitary" and Latin
Latin
monachus[1]) is a person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks. A monk may be a person who decides to dedicate his life to serving all other living beings, or to be an ascetic who voluntarily chooses to leave mainstream society and live his or her life in prayer and contemplation. The concept is ancient and can be seen in many religions and in philosophy. In the Greek language
Greek language
the term can apply to women, but in modern English it is mainly in use for men. The word nun is typically used for female monastics. Although the term monachos is of Christian
Christian
origin, in the English language monk tends to be used loosely also for both male and female ascetics from other religious or philosophical backgrounds
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Eastern Roman Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Pope Vigilius
Pope
Pope
Vigilius (d
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God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
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Troy
Troy
Troy
(Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Latin: Troia and Ilium;[note 1] Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha;[1][2] Turkish: Truva or Troya) was a city situated in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia
Anatolia
in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War
Trojan War
described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer
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Agamemnon
In Greek mythology, Agamemnon
Agamemnon
(/æɡəˈmɛmnɒn/; Greek: Ἀγαμέμνων) was the son of King Atreus
Atreus
and Queen Aerope
Aerope
of Mycenae, the brother of Menelaus, the husband of Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra
and the father of Iphigenia, Electra
Electra
or Laodike (Λαοδίκη), Orestes
Orestes
and Chrysothemis.[1] Legends make him the king of Mycenae
Mycenae
or Argos, thought to be different names for the same area.[2] When Helen, the wife of Menelaus, was taken to Troy
Troy
by Paris, Agamemnon
Agamemnon
commanded the united Greek armed forces in the ensuing Trojan War. Upon Agamemnon's return from Troy, he was murdered (according to the oldest surviving account, Odyssey
Odyssey
11.409–11) by Aegisthus, the lover of his wife, Clytemnestra
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Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Pharaoh
(/ˈfeɪ.roʊ/, /fɛr.oʊ/[1][2] or /fær.oʊ/;[2] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 30 BCE,[3] although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Nesu Bety, and the Nebty name. The Golden Horus
Horus
and Nomen and prenomen titles were later added. In Egyptian society, religion was central to everyday life. One of the roles of the pharaoh was as an intermediary between the gods and the people. The pharaoh thus deputised for the gods; his role was both as civil and religious administrator
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Belisarius
Flavius Belisarius
Belisarius
(Greek: Φλάβιος Βελισάριος, c. 505[2] – 565) was a general of the Byzantine Empire. He was instrumental to Emperor Justinian's ambitious project of reconquering much of the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
territory of the former Western Roman Empire, which had been lost less than a century previously. One of the defining features of Belisarius's career was his success despite varying levels of support from Justinian. His name is frequently given as one of the so-called "Last of the Romans". Belisarius
Belisarius
is considered a military genius, he demolished the Ostrogothic army in Italy
Italy
twice with 7500 men and then 4000 men. Belisarius
Belisarius
was instrumental in the recovery of North Africa, also Belisarius
Belisarius
beat back the Persians from invading and ransacking the Empire
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History Of The Roman Empire
The history of the Roman Empire covers the history of Ancient Rome from the fall of the Roman Republic in 27 BC until the abdication of the last Western emperor in 476 AD. Rome had begun expanding shortly after the founding of the Republic in the 6th century BC, though it did not expand outside of the Italian Peninsula until the 3rd century BC.[6] Civil war engulfed the Roman state in the mid 1st century BC, first between Julius Caesar and Pompey, and finally between Octavian and Mark Antony. Antony was defeated at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC. In 27 BC the Senate and People of Rome made Octavian imperator ("commander") thus beginning the Principate, the first epoch of Roman imperial history usually dated from 27 BC to 284 AD; they later awarded him the name Augustus, "the venerated"
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Trinitarianism
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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Ravenna Cosmography
The Ravenna
Ravenna
Cosmography
Cosmography
(Latin: Ravennatis Anonymi Cosmographia, lit. "The Cosmography
Cosmography
of the Unknown Ravennese") is a list of place-names covering the world from India
India
to Ireland, compiled by an anonymous cleric in Ravenna
Ravenna
around AD 700. Textual evidence indicates that the author frequently used maps as his source.Contents1 The Text 2 See also 3 External links3.1 The Cosmographia 3.2 Sites dealing with the British section 3.3 Sites dealing with the Iberian section4 ReferencesThe Text[edit] The most recent critical edition of the three manuscripts is that of Joseph Schnetz in 1942.[1] The surviving texts are quite challenging. The three manuscript copies are distanced from the autograph (original manuscript) by three or four generations
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Classical Philology (journal)
Classical Philology is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1906. It is published by the University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press
and covers all aspects of Graeco-Roman antiquity, including literature, languages, anthropology, history, social life, philosophy, religion, art, material culture, and the history of classical studies
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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