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Joint Base Langley–Eustis
A joint or articulation (or articular surface) is the connection made between bones in the body which link the skeletal system into a functional whole.[1][2][3] They are constructed to allow for different degrees and types of movement. Some joints, such as the knee, elbow, and shoulder, are self-lubricating, almost frictionless, and are able to withstand compression and maintain heavy loads while still executing smooth and precise movements.[3] Other joints such as sutures between the bones of the skull permit very little movement (only during birth) in order to protect the brain and the sense organs.[3] The connection between a tooth and the jawbone is also called a joint, and is described as a fibrous joint known as a gomphosis
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Joint (other)
Joint
Joint
is a location where two bones make contact. Joint
Joint
may also refer to:Contents1 Science1.1 Physics 1.2 Architecture, construction and mechanical engineering 1.3 Geology and geotechincal engineering2 Music 3 Other 4 See alsoScience[edit] Physics[edit]
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Condyloid Joint
A condyloid joint (also called condylar, ellipsoidal, or bicondylar[1]) is an ovoid articular surface, or condyle that is received into an elliptical cavity. This permits movement in two planes, allowing flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, and circumduction. Examples[edit] Examples include:[2]the wrist-joint metacarpophalangeal joints metatarsophalangeal jointsThese are also called happy joints. Oval shaped condyle of one bone fits into elliptical cavity of other bone. These joints allow biaxial movements i.e
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Saddle Joint
In a saddle joint (sellar joint, articulation by reciprocal reception) the opposing surfaces are reciprocally concave-convex. Movements[edit] The movements are as same as in the condyloid joint; that is to say, flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, and circumduction are allowed; but no axial rotation
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Degrees Of Freedom (mechanics)
In physics, the degree of freedom (DOF) of a mechanical system is the number of independent parameters that define its configuration. It is the number of parameters that determine the state of a physical system and is important to the analysis of systems of bodies in mechanical engineering, aeronautical engineering, robotics, and structural engineering. The position of a single railcar (engine) moving along a track has one degree of freedom because the position of the car is defined by the distance along the track. A train of rigid cars connected by hinges to an engine still has only one degree of freedom because the positions of the cars behind the engine are constrained by the shape of the track. An automobile with highly stiff suspension can be considered to be a rigid body traveling on a plane (a flat, two-dimensional space). This body has three independent degrees of freedom consisting of two components of translation and one angle of rotation
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Shoulder Joint
The shoulder joint (or glenohumeral joint from Greek glene, eyeball, + -oid, 'form of', + Latin
Latin
humerus, shoulder) is structurally classified as a synovial ball and socket joint and functionally as a diarthrosis and multiaxial joint. It involves articulation between the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) and the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). Due to the very loose joint capsule that gives a limited interface of the humerus and scapula, it is the most mobile joint of the human body.Contents1 Structure1.1 Spaces 1.2 Capsule 1.3 Bursae 1.4 Muscles 1.5 Ligaments 1.6 Innervation 1.7 Blood supply2 Function2.1 Movements3 Clinical significance 4 Additional images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit]Cross-section of shoulder joint.The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint between the scapula and the humerus
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Hip Joint
In vertebrate anatomy, hip (or "coxa"[1] in medical terminology) refers to either an anatomical region or a joint. The hip region is located lateral and anterior to the gluteal region (i.e., the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the femur, or "thigh bone".[2] In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone or acetabulum which forms part of the hip region. The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulofemoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static (e.g. standing) and dynamic (e.g. walking or running) postures. The hip joints are the most important part in retaining balance
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Radiocarpal Joint
In human anatomy, the wrist is variously defined as 1) the carpus or carpal bones, the complex of eight bones forming the proximal skeletal segment of the hand;[1][2] (2) the wrist joint or radiocarpal joint, the joint between the radius and the carpus;[2] and (3) the anatomical region surrounding the carpus including the distal parts of the bones of the forearm and the proximal parts of the metacarpus or five metacarpal bones and the series of joints between these bones, thus referred to as wrist joints.[3][4] This region also includes the carpal tunnel, the anatomical snuff box, bracelet lines, the flexor retinaculum, and the extensor retinaculum. As a consequence of these various definitions, fractures to the carpal bones are referred to as carpal fractures, while fractures such as distal radius fracture are often considered fractures to the wrist.Contents1 Structure1.1 Articulations1.1.1 Articular Surfaces2 Function2.1 Movement3 Clin
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Articular Disc
The articular disk (or disc) is a thin, oval plate of fibrocartilage present in several joints which separates synovial cavities. This separation of the cavity space allows for separate movements to occur in each space. The presence of an articular disk also permits a more even distribution of forces between the articulating surfaces of bones, increases the stability of the joint, and aids in directing the flow of synovial fluid to areas of the articular cartilage that experience the most friction. The term "meniscus" has a very similar meaning.[1]Contents1 Additional images 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksAdditional images[edit]Sternoclavicular articulation
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Meniscus (anatomy)
A meniscus is a crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous anatomical structure that, in contrast to an articular disk, only partly divides a joint cavity.[1] In humans they are present in the knee, wrist, acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints;[2] in other animals they may be present in other joints. Generally, the term 'meniscus' is used to refer to the cartilage of the knee, either to the lateral or medial meniscus. Both are cartilaginous tissues that provide structural integrity to the knee when it undergoes tension and torsion
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Knee
The knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).[1] It is the largest joint in the human body.[2] The knee is a modified hinge joint, which permits flexion and extension as well as slight internal and external rotation
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Joints Of Hand
The joints in the hand are joints found at the distal end of the upper limb. The joints are:In the wrist there is the radiocarpal joint between the radius and carpus
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Wrist
In human anatomy, the wrist is variously defined as 1) the carpus or carpal bones, the complex of eight bones forming the proximal skeletal segment of the hand;[1][2] (2) the wrist joint or radiocarpal joint, the joint between the radius and the carpus;[2] and (3) the anatomical region surrounding the carpus including the distal parts of the bones of the forearm and the proximal parts of the metacarpus or five metacarpal bones and the series of joints between these bones, thus referred to as wrist joints.[3][4] This region also includes the carpal tunnel, the anatomical snuff box, bracelet lines, the flexor retinaculum, and the extensor retinaculum. As a consequence of these various definitions, fractures to the carpal bones are referred to as carpal fractures, while fractures such as distal radius fracture are often considered fractures to the wrist.Contents1 Structure1.1 Articulations1.1.1 Articular Surfaces2 Function2.1 Movement3 Clin
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Hinge Joint
A hinge joint (ginglymus) is a bone joint in which the articular surfaces are molded to each other in such a manner as to permit motion only in one plane. According to one classification system they are said to be uniaxial (having one degree of freedom).[1] The direction which the distal bone takes in this motion is seldom in the same plane as that of the axis of the proximal bone; there is usually a certain amount of deviation from the straight line during flexion. The articular surfaces of the bones are connected by strong collateral ligaments. The best examples of ginglymoid joints are the Interphalangeal joints of the hand and those of the foot and the joint between the humerus and ulna. The knee joints and ankle joints are less typical, as they allow a slight degree of rotation or of side-to-side movement in certain positions of the limb. The knee is the largest hinge joint in the human body. Hinge and pivot joints are both types of synovial joint
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Axillary Articulations (other)
Axillary articulations refers to these joints in the shoulder:Glenohumeral joint acromioclavicular jointThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Axillary articulations. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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