HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Johnny Mercer
John Herndon Mercer (November 18, 1909 – June 25, 1976) was an American lyricist, songwriter and singer. He was also a record label executive, who co-founded Capitol Records
Capitol Records
with music industry businessman Buddy DeSylva
Buddy DeSylva
and Glenn E. Wallichs.[1] He is best known as a tin pan alley lyricist, but he also composed music. He was also a popular singer who recorded his own songs as well as those written by others. From the mid-1930s through the mid-1950s, many of the songs Mercer wrote and performed were among the most popular hits of the time
[...More...]

"Johnny Mercer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
[...More...]

"Princeton University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Berendt
John Berendt (born December 5, 1939) is an American author, known for writing the best-selling non-fiction book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, which was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction.Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 Further reading3.1 Archival resources4 External linksBiography[edit] Berendt grew up in Syracuse, New York, where both of his parents were writers. As an English major at Harvard University, he worked on the staff of the Harvard Lampoon
[...More...]

"John Berendt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Savannah, Georgia
Savannah (/səˈvænə/) is the oldest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Georgia and is the county seat of Chatham County. Established in 1733 on the Savannah River, the city of Savannah became the British colonial capital of the Province of Georgia
Province of Georgia
and later the first state capital of Georgia.[4] A strategic port city in the American Revolution and during the American Civil War,[5] Savannah is today an industrial center and an important Atlantic seaport
[...More...]

"Savannah, Georgia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Georgia (U.S. State)
Georgia (/ˈdʒɔːrdʒə/ ( listen) JOR-jə) is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last of the original Thirteen Colonies.[5] Named after King George II of Great Britain,[6] the Province of Georgia
Province of Georgia
covered the area from South Carolina
South Carolina
down to Spanish Florida
Spanish Florida
and New France
New France
along Louisiana (New France), also bordering to the west towards the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788.[7] In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi
Mississippi
Territory, which later split to form Alabama
Alabama
with part of former West Florida
West Florida
in 1819
[...More...]

"Georgia (U.S. State)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Married And Maiden Names
When a person (traditionally the wife in many cultures) assumes the family name of his or her spouse, that name replaces the person's birth surname, which in the case of the wife is called the maiden name (birth name is also used as a gender-neutral or masculine substitute for maiden name), whereas a married name is a family name or surname adopted by a person upon marriage. In some jurisdictions, changing one's name requires a legal procedure. Nevertheless, in some jurisdictions anyone who either marries or divorces may change his or her name
[...More...]

"Married And Maiden Names" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Croats
Croats
Croats
(/ˈkroʊæt, ˈkroʊɑːt/; Croatian: Hrvati, pronounced [xr̩ʋăːti]) are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia. Croats
Croats
mainly live in Croatia
Croatia
and Bosnia and Herzegovina, but are an officially recognized minority in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, and Slovakia. Responding to political, social and economic pressure, many Croats
Croats
have migrated throughout Europe (especially Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France
France
and Italy) and the Americas (particularly the United States, Canada, Argentina, and Chile), establishing a diaspora.[40][41] Croats
Croats
are mostly Roman Catholics
[...More...]

"Croats" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
[...More...]

"American Revolutionary War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George S. Patton
Seventh United States Army Third United States Army Fifteenth United States ArmySee other commands304th Tank
Tank
Brigade 3rd Squadron, 3rd Cavalry 5th Cavalry Regiment 3d Cavalry Regiment 2nd Brigade, 2nd Armored Division 2nd Armored Division I Armored Corps Desert Training Center II CorpsBattles/warsSee battlesMexican RevolutionBattle of San MiguelitoWorld War ISaint Mihiel Campaign Meuse-Argonne CampaignWorld War IIOperation Torch North African Campaign Tunisia Campaign Sicily Campaign Lorraine Campaign Ardennes Campaign Rhineland Campaign Central Europe CampaignAwards Distinguished Service Cross (2) Distinguished Service Medal (3) Silver Star
Silver Star
(2) Legion of Merit Bronze Star Purple Heart Complete list of decorationsRelations George Patton IV
George Patton IV
(son) John K. Waters
John K. Waters
(son-in-law)SignatureGeneral George Smith Patton Jr
[...More...]

"George S. Patton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lastovo
Lastovo
Lastovo
(pronounced [lâstɔv̞ɔ]; Italian: Lagosta, German: Augusta, Latin: Augusta Insula, Greek: Ladestanos, Illyrian: Ladest) is an island municipality in the Dubrovnik-Neretva County
Dubrovnik-Neretva County
in Croatia. The municipality consists of 46 islands with a total population of 792 people,[3] of which 93% are ethnic Croats, and a land area of approximately 53 square kilometres (20 sq mi).[4][5] The biggest island in the municipality is also named Lastovo, as is the largest town. The majority of the population lives on the 46 square kilometres (18 sq mi) island of Lastovo. Lastovo, like the rest of the Roman province of Dalmatia, was settled by Illyrians. The Romans conquered and settled the entire area, retaining control until the Avar invasions and Slavic migrations in the 7th century
[...More...]

"Lastovo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Singer
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
[...More...]

"Singer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Croatia
Coordinates: 45°10′N 15°30′E / 45.167°N 15.500°E / 45.167; 15.500 Republic
Republic
of Croatia Republika Hrvatska[a]FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Lijepa naša domovino" "Our Beautiful Homeland"Location of  Croatia  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Zagreb 45°48′N 16°0′E / 45.800°N 16.000°E / 45.800; 16.000Official languages CroatianRecognised national languages See Languages of Cro
[...More...]

"Croatia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coon Song
Coon songs
Coon songs
were a genre of music that presented a stereotyped image of black people. They were popular in the United States
United States
and the United Kingdom from around 1880[1] to 1920,[2] though the earliest such songs date from minstrel shows as far back as 1848.[3]Contents1 Rise and fall from popularity 2 Composers 3 Characteristics 4 Use in theater 5 Effects on African-American music 6 In Britain 7 See also 8 References 9 Works cited 10 External linksRise and fall from popularity[edit] The first explicitly coon-themed song, published in 1880, may have been "The Dandy Coon's Parade" by J.P. Skelley.[1] Other notable early coon songs included "The Coons Are on Parade", "New Coon in Town" (by J.S
[...More...]

"Coon Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ma Rainey
"Ma" Rainey (born Gertrude Pridgett, September 1882[1] or April 26, 1886 – December 22, 1939)[2] was one of the earliest African-American professional blues singers and one of the first generation of blues singers to record.[3] She was billed as the "Mother of the Blues". She began performing as a young teenager and became known as Ma Rainey after her marriage to Will Rainey, in 1904. They toured with the Rabbit Foot Minstrels and later formed their own group, Rainey and Rainey, Assassinators of the Blues. Her first recording was made in 1923. In the next five years, she made over 100 recordings, including "Bo-Weevil Blues" (1923), "Moonshine Blues" (1923), "See See Rider Blues" (1924), "Black Bottom" (1927), and "Soon This Morning" (1927).[4] Rainey was known for her powerful vocal abilities, energetic disposition, majestic phrasing, and a "moaning" style of singing
[...More...]

"Ma Rainey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bessie Smith
Bessie Smith
Bessie Smith
(April 15, 1894 – September 26, 1937) was an American blues singer. Nicknamed the Empress of the Blues, she was the most popular female blues singer of the 1920s and 1930s.[1] She is often regarded as one of the greatest singers of her era and was a major influence on other jazz singers.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Career2.1 Broadway 2.2 Film 2.3 Swing Era3 Death3.1 Unmarked grave4 Hit records 5 Selected awards and recognition5.1 Grammy Hall of Fame 5.2 National Recording Registry 5.3 Inductions 5.4 U.S. postage stamp6 Digital remastering 7 In popular culture 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksLife[edit]Smith in 1936The 1900 census indicates that her family reported that Bessie Smith was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in July 1892.[3][4] The 1910 census gives her age as 16,[5] and a birth date of April 15, 1894 appears on subsequent documents and was observed as her birthday by the Smith family
[...More...]

"Bessie Smith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Louis Armstrong
Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo,[2] Satch, and Pops,[3] was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.[4] In 2017, he was inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame. Armstrong was born and raised in New Orleans. Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an "inventive" trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance.[5] Around 1922, he followed his mentor, Joe "King" Oliver, to Chicago to play in the Creole Jazz
Jazz
Band. In the Windy City, he networked with other jazz musicians, reconnecting with his friend, Bix Biederbecke, and made new contacts, which included Hoagy Carmichael
Hoagy Carmichael
and Lil Hardin
[...More...]

"Louis Armstrong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.