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John The Apostle
John the Apostle
John the Apostle
(Aramaic: ܝܘܚܢܢ ܫܠܝܚܐ‎ Yohanān Shliḥā; Hebrew: יוחנן בן זבדי‬ Yohanan ben Zavdi; Koine Greek: Ιωάννης; Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ; Latin: Ioannes; c. AD 6-100) was one of the Twelve Apostles
Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
according to the New Testament, which refers to him as Ἰωάννης. Generally listed as the youngest apostle, he was the son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and Salome
Salome
or Joanna. His brother was James, who was another of the Twelve Apostles
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Pietro Perugino
Pietro Perugino
Pietro Perugino
(Italian: [ˈpjɛːtro peruˈdʒiːno]; c. 1446/1452 – 1523), born Pietro Vannucci, was an Italian Renaissance painter of the Umbrian school, who developed some of the qualities that found classic expression in the High Renaissance. Raphael
Raphael
was his most famous pupil.Contents1 Early years 2 Rome 3 Major works 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksEarly years[edit] He was born Pietro Vannucci in Città della Pieve, Umbria, the son of Cristoforo Marie Vannucci. His nickname characterizes him as from Perugia, the chief city of Umbria. Scholars continue to dispute the socioeconomic status of the Vannucci family
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Patron Saint
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.[1][2][title missing][page needed] Catholics believe that patron saints, having already transcended to the metaphysical, are able to intercede effectively for the needs of their special charges.[3] Historically, a similar practice has also occurred in many Islamic lands
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Crucifixion Of Jesus
The crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
occurred in 1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources,[1] although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.[2][3][4] According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans.[5][6][7][8] Jesus
Jesus
was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
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John The Presbyter
In the New Testament, a presbyter (Greek πρεσβύτερος: "elder") is a leader of a local Christian congregation. The word derives from the Greek presbyteros, which means elder or senior. The Greek word episkopos literally means overseer; it refers exclusively to the office of bishop
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Bethsaida
Bethsaida
Bethsaida
/bɛθˈseɪ.ɪdə/[1] (from Hebrew/Aramaic בית צידה‬ beth-tsaida, lit. "house of hunting" or "fishing", from the Hebrew root צדה‬ or צוד‬) is a place mentioned in the New Testament.Contents1 Bethsaida
Bethsaida
Julias1.1 Identification2 Bethsaida
Bethsaida
of Galilee 3 One or two Bethsaidas? 4 1217 battle 5 See also 6 External Link 7 Notes 8 References 9 External links Bethsaida
Bethsaida
Julias[edit] A city east of the Jordan River, it is in a "desert place" (that is, uncultivated ground used for grazing), possibly the site at which Jesus
Jesus
miraculously fed the multitude with five loaves and two fish (Mark 6:32; Luke 9:10)
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Joanna
Joanna
Joanna
is a feminine given name deriving from Koine
Koine
Greek Ἰωάννα Iōanna from Hebrew
Hebrew
יוֹחָנָה Yôḥānnāh meaning 'God is gracious'. Variants in English include Joan, Joann, Joanne, and Johanna. Other forms of the name in English are Jan, Jane, Janet, Janice, Jean, and Jeanne. The earliest recorded occurrence of the name Joanna, in Luke 8:3, refers to the disciple " Joanna
Joanna
the wife of Chuza," who was an associate of Mary Magdalene. Her name as given is Greek in form, although it ultimately originated from the Hebrew
Hebrew
masculine name יְהוֹחָנָן Yehôḥānān or יוֹחָנָן Yôḥānān meaning 'God is gracious'. In Greek this name became Ιωαννης Iōannēs, from which Iōanna was derived by giving it a feminine ending
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Coptic Language
Coptic or Coptic Egyptian (Bohairic: ϯⲙⲉⲧⲣⲉⲙⲛ̀ⲭⲏⲙⲓ ti.met.rem.ən.khēmi and Sahidic: ⲧⲙⲛ̄ⲧⲣⲙ̄ⲛ̄ⲕⲏⲙⲉ t.mənt.rəm.ən.kēme) is the latest stage of the Egyptian language, a northern Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Egypt
Egypt
until at least the 17th century.[2] Egyptian began to be written in the Coptic alphabet, an adaptation of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
with the addition of six or seven signs from demotic to represent Egyptian sounds the Greek language
Greek language
did not have, in the first century AD.[3] Several distinct Coptic dialects are identified, the most prominent of which are Sahidic, originating in parts of Upper Egypt, and Bohairic, originally from the western Nile Delta
Nile Delta
in Lower Egypt. Coptic and Demotic are grammatically closely related to Late Egyptian, which was written with Egyptian hieroglyphs
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Koine Greek
Koine Greek
Koine Greek
(UK English /ˈkɔɪniː/,[1] US English /kɔɪˈneɪ/, /ˈkɔɪneɪ/ or /kiːˈniː/;[2][3]), also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during Hellenistic and Roman antiquity and the early Byzantine era, or Late Antiquity. It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Aramaic Language
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
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Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (known as the LDS Church or, informally, the Mormon Church) is a Nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations and built temples worldwide
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Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Anglican
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
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