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John Peter Altgeld
John Peter Altgeld
John Peter Altgeld
(December 30, 1847 – March 12, 1902) was an American politician and the 20th Governor of Illinois, serving from 1893 until 1897. He was the first Democrat to govern that state since the 1850s. A leading figure of the Progressive movement, Altgeld signed workplace safety and child labor laws, pardoned three of the men convicted in the Haymarket Affair, and rejected calls in 1894 to break up the Pullman strike
Pullman strike
by force. In 1896 he was a leader of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, opposing President Grover Cleveland and the conservative Bourbon Democrats
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Andrew County, Missouri
Andrew County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the county had a population of 17,291.[1] Its county seat is Savannah.[2] The county was organized January 29, 1841 and named for Andrew Jackson Davis, a lawyer and prominent citizen of St. Louis.[3] Andrew County is part of the St
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Midwest
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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Progressive Era
The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States that spanned from the 1890s to the 1920s.[1] The main objectives of the Progressive movement were eliminating problems caused by industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and corruption in government. The movement primarily targeted political machines and their bosses. By taking down these corrupt representatives in office a further means of direct democracy would be established
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Occupational Safety And Health
Occupational safety and health
Occupational safety and health
(OSH), also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS), occupational health,[1] or workplace health and safety (WHS), is a multidisciplinary field concerned with the safety, health, and welfare of people at work. These terms also refer to the goals of this field,[2] so their use in the sense of this article was originally an abbreviation of occupational safety and health program/department etc. The goals of occupational safety and health programs include to foster a safe and healthy work environment.[3] OSH may also protect co-workers, family members, employers, customers, and many others who might be affected by the workplace environment
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Child Labor
Child labour
Child labour
refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.[3] This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations
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Philip Dray
Philip Dray is an American writer and independent public historian, known for his comprehensive analyses of American scientific, racial, and labor history.Contents1 Awards 2 Books2.1 Children's books3 References 4 External links4.1 Independent reviews 4.2 InterviewsAwards[edit] Dray's work At the Hands of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award.[1] He was a finalist in 2003 for a Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
in history.[2] Books[edit]Philip Dray. There Is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America. Doubleday, 2010. ISBN 978-0-385-52629-6 Philip Dray. Capitol Men: The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen. Mariner Books, 2010. ISBN 978-0-547-24797-7 Philip Dray. Stealing God's Thunder: Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America. Random House, 2005. ISBN 978-0-8129-6810-1 Philip Dray
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Lieutenant Governor Of Illinois
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Bourbon Democrats
Bourbon Democrat
Bourbon Democrat
was a term used in the United States
United States
in the later 19th century (1872–1904) to refer to members of the Democratic Party who were ideologically aligned with conservatism or classical liberalism, especially those who supported presidential candidates Charles O'Conor
Charles O'Conor
in 1872, Samuel J. Tilden
Samuel J. Tilden
in 1876, President Grover Cleveland in 1884–1888/1892–1896 and Alton B. Parker
Alton B. Parker
in 1904. After 1904, the Bourbons faded away
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Union Army
American Indian Wars American Civil WarFort Sumter First Bull Run Wilson's Creek Forts Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg Raid Mississippi River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Bull Run South Mountain Antietam Hartsville Fredericksburg Stones River Chancellorsville Gettysburg Champion Hill Vicksburg siege Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania Sabine Pass New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg siege Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief 16th President of the United States
United States
- Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(1861-1865) 17th President Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(1865)General-in-Chief 1st: Winfield Scott 2nd: George B. McClellan 3rd: Henry W. Halleck Final: Ulysses S
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State's Attorney
A state's attorney or state attorney is a lawyer representing the interests of the state in a legal proceeding, typically as a prosecutor. It is an official title in the United States, sometimes appointed but most commonly an elected official serving as the chief law enforcement officer of his or her county, circuit, or district. The offices of district attorney, commonwealth's attorney, county attorney, county prosecutor, or prosecuting attorney are more frequently the case in the United States
United States
although South Carolina
South Carolina
uses the term solicitor. Other countries also use or used the term state attorney, like the Boer republics
Boer republics
of the Orange Free State (1854–1902) and the South African Republic
South African Republic
(1852–1902) in South Africa. In these cases the position corresponded to that of the attorney general in the British judicial system
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Newark, Ohio
Newark is a city in and the county seat of Licking County, Ohio, United States,[6] 33 miles (53 km) east of Columbus, at the junction of the forks of the Licking River. The estimated population was 49,134 at the 2016 census, which makes it the 20th largest city in Ohio.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census4 Business 5 Education 6 Climate 7 Notable people 8 References in culture 9 Points of interest 10 References 11 Bibliography 12 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Newark Earthworks
Newark Earthworks
mound, Hopewell culture, 100 AD-500 AD Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
lived along the river valleys for thousands of years before European contact
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Mansfield, Ohio
Mansfield
Mansfield
is a city in and the county seat of Richland County, Ohio, United States.[6] Located midway between Columbus and Cleveland
Cleveland
via Interstate 71, it is part of Northeast Ohio
Ohio
and North-central Ohio regions in the western foothills of the Allegheny Plateau. The city lies approximately 65 miles (105 km) northeast of Columbus, 65 miles (105 km) southwest of Cleveland
Cleveland
and 91 miles (146 km) southeast of Toledo. The city was founded in 1808 on a fork of the Mohican River
Mohican River
in a hilly region surrounded by fertile farmlands, and became a manufacturing center owing to its location with numerous railroad lines. After the decline of heavy manufacturing, the city's economy has since diversified into a service economy, including retailing, education, and healthcare sectors
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Streetcar
A tram (also tramcar; and in North America streetcar, trolley or trolley car) is a rail vehicle which runs on tracks along public urban streets, and also sometimes on a segregated right of way.[1][2] The lines or networks operated by tramcars are called tramways. Tramways powered by electricity, the most common type, were once called electric street railways (mainly in the United States) due to their being widely used in urban areas before the universal adoption of electrification. In the United States, the term tram has sometimes been used for rubber-tyred trackless trains, which are not related to the other vehicles covered in this article. Tram
Tram
vehicles are usually lighter and shorter than conventional trains and rapid transit trains. Today, most trams use electrical power, usually fed by an overhead pantograph; in some cases by a sliding shoe on a third rail, trolley pole or bow collector
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Missouri
Missouri
Missouri
is a state in the Midwestern
Midwestern
United States.[5] With over six million residents, it is the 18th-most populous state of the Union. The largest urban areas are Kansas
Kansas
City, St. Louis, Springfield, and Columbia; the capital is Jefferson City, located on the Missouri River. The state is the 21st-most extensive in area. In the South are the Ozarks, a forested highland, providing timber, minerals, and recreation. The Mississippi River
Mississippi River
forms the eastern border of the state. Humans have inhabited the land now known as Missouri
Missouri
for at least 12,000 years. The Mississippian culture
Mississippian culture
built cities and mounds, before declining in the 1300s. When European explorers arrived in the 1600s they encountered the Osage and Missouria
Missouria
nations
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