HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

John More Dick Peddie
John More Dick Peddie
John More Dick Peddie
(21 August 1853 – 10 March 1921) was a Scottish architect. Biography[edit] Peddie was the son of the architect and politician John Dick Peddie (1824–1891) and his wife Euphemia Lockhart More. Born in Edinburgh, he attended Edinburgh Academy, followed by two years at a school in Elberfeld, Germany. He enrolled at Edinburgh University, and was also articled to his father's office. He then worked in the office of George Gilbert Scott, and later made a Grand Tour
Grand Tour
in Europe.[1] In 1875, he joined his father's firm, Peddie and Kinnear, and in 1878 became a partner. Peddie senior retired in 1879 and entered Parliament as Liberal MP for Kilmarnock Burghs. The practice became known as Kinnear and Peddie, with Charles Kinnear
Charles Kinnear
as senior partner
[...More...]

picture info

Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
[...More...]

picture info

Royal Scottish Academy
The Royal Scottish Academy
Royal Scottish Academy
(RSA) is the country’s national academy of art. It promotes contemporary Scottish art. Founded in 1819 as the Royal Institution for the Encouragement of the Fine Arts in Scotland, in 1826 it was named the Scottish Academy, and it became the Royal Scottish Academy
Royal Scottish Academy
on being granted a royal charter in 1838. The RSA maintains a unique position in the country as an independently funded institution led by eminent artists and architects to promote and support the creation, understanding, and enjoyment of visual arts through exhibitions and related educational events.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Academicians 3 Past Presidents 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] In addition to a continuous programme of exhibitions, the RSA also administers scholarships, awards, and residencies for artists who live and work in Scotland
[...More...]

picture info

Scottish Investment Trust
Scottish Investment Trust
Scottish Investment Trust
(LSE: SCIN) is a large self-managed investment trust with a global investment mandate. Established in 1887, the company, based in Edinburgh, is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index
[...More...]

picture info

Edinburgh Corporation Tramways
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Corporation Tramways formerly served the City of Edinburgh, Scotland
[...More...]

picture info

Beaux-Arts Architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
(/ˌboʊˈzɑːr/; French: [bozaʁ]) was the academic architectural style taught at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, particularly from the 1830s to the end of the 19th century. It drew upon the principles of French neoclassicism, but also incorporated Gothic, and Renaissance
Renaissance
elements, and used modern materials, such as iron and glass. It was an important style in France until the end of the 19th century
[...More...]

picture info

British Linen Bank
The British Linen
Linen
Bank was a commercial bank based in Britain. It was acquired by the Bank of Scotland
Bank of Scotland
in 1969 and served as the establishment's merchant bank arm from 1977 until 1999.[citation needed]Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Move into banking 1.3 Expansion 1.4 Amalgamations 1.5 Merchant bank2 British Linen
Linen
Advisors 3 In popular culture 4 External links 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Foundation[edit]The Bank's former Head Office in St. Andrew Square, EdinburghBritish Linen
Linen
Company carving in GovanThe Edinburgh-based British Linen
Linen
was "the only British bank to be formed on the basis of an industrial charter" and, as the name suggests, its roots lay in the Scottish linen industry
[...More...]

picture info

Craiglockhart Hydropathic
Craiglockhart
Craiglockhart
Hydropathic, now a part of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Napier University and known as Craiglockhart
Craiglockhart
Campus, is a building with surrounding grounds in Craiglockhart, Edinburgh, Scotland.Main front showing the scale of the HydropathicView of the side of the campus showing the original Hydropathic building and the newly built Business School.Contents1 Origins 2 The Hydropathic and the War Hospital 3 Later uses 4 References 5 See alsoOrigins[edit] The estate in which the Hydropathic's building lies was sold in 1773 to Alexander Monro, who was second of three generations to be Professor of Anatomy
Anatomy
at the University of Edinburgh
[...More...]

picture info

Bank Of Scotland
The Bank
Bank
of Scotland
Scotland
plc (Scottish Gaelic: Banca na h-Alba)[2] is a commercial and clearing bank based in Edinburgh, Scotland. With a history dating to the 17th century, it is the fifth-oldest surviving bank in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(the Bank of England
Bank of England
having been established one year before), and is the only commercial institution created by the Parliament of Scotland
Scotland
to remain in existence. It was one of the first banks in Europe
Europe
to print its own banknotes and it continues to print its own sterling banknotes under legal arrangements which allow Scottish banks to issue currency. In June 2006, the HBOS Group Reorganisation Act 2006
HBOS Group Reorganisation Act 2006
was passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom, allowing the bank's structure to be simplified
[...More...]

Recession
In economics, a recession is a business cycle contraction when there is a general decline in economic activity.[1][2] Recessions generally occur when there is a widespread drop in spending (an adverse demand shock). This may be triggered by various events, such as a financial crisis, an external trade shock, an adverse supply shock or the bursting of an economic bubble
[...More...]

picture info

City Of Glasgow Bank
The City of Glasgow
Glasgow
Bank is now largely known for its spectacular collapse in October 1878, ruining all but 254 of its 1,200 shareholders, whose liability was not limited.Contents1 General 2 The Collapse 3 Archives 4 In Literature 5 References 6 External linksGeneral[edit]A cleared cheque from 1877The Bank was founded in 1839,[1] with an initial capital of £656,250 (about £46m at 2005 prices). It aimed to cater particularly for small investors, with its branches opening in the evenings to receive deposits; its name is said to have been designed to allude to that of the City Bank of New York. The principal office was established in Virginia Street, Glasgow
Glasgow
in 1842, and moved to Glassford Street in 1851
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Kilmarnock Burghs (UK Parliament Constituency)
Kilmarnock
Kilmarnock
Burghs was a district of burghs constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United K

[...More...]

picture info

Grand Tour
The term "Grand Tour" refers to the 17th- and 18th-century custom of a traditional trip of Europe
Europe
undertaken by mainly upper-class young European men of sufficient means and rank (typically accompanied by a chaperon, such as a family member) when they had come of age (about 21 years old).[citation needed] Young women of equally sufficient means ("debutantes"), or those of either gender of a more humble origin who could find a sponsor, could also partake. The custom—which flourished from about 1660 until the advent of large-scale rail transport in the 1840s and was associated with a standard itinerary—served as an educational rite of passage. Though the Grand Tour was primarily associated with the British nobility
British nobility
and wealthy landed gentry, similar trips were made by wealthy young men of other Protestant Northern European nations, and, from the second half of the 18th century, by some South and North Americans
[...More...]

picture info

George Gilbert Scott
Sir George Gilbert Scott RA (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878), styled Sir Gilbert Scott, was a prolific English Gothic revival
Gothic revival
architect, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals, although he started his career as a leading designer of workhouses
[...More...]

picture info

Articled
An articled clerk is someone who is studying to either be an accountant or lawyer. In doing so they are put under the supervision of someone already in the profession, usually for two years. This can be compared as being an intern for a company, the only difference is once the two years is over the trainee becomes the trainer. Trainees are obligated to sign a contract agree to the term of being an articled clerk. The articled clerk signs a contract, known as "articles of clerkship", committing to a fixed period of employment. Wharton's Law
Law
Lexicon defines an articled clerk as "a pupil of a solicitor, who undertakes, by articles of clerkship, continuing covenants, mutually binding, to instruct him in the principles and practice of the profession".[1] The contract is with a specific partner in the firm and not with the firm as a whole. Apprentice architects can also be articled
[...More...]

.