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John McCabe (composer)
John McCabe, CBE (21 April 1939 – 13 February 2015) was a British composer and pianist. He created works in many different forms, including symphonies, ballets, and solo works for the piano. He served as principal of the London College of Music
London College of Music
from 1983 to 1990
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Commander Of The Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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University Of Melbourne
The University of Melbourne
Melbourne
(informally Melbourne
Melbourne
University) is a public research university located in Melbourne, Australia. Founded in 1853, it is Australia's second oldest university and the oldest in Victoria.[7] Times Higher Education ranks Melbourne
Melbourne
as 33rd in the world,[8] while the Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
places Melbourne
Melbourne
40th in the world (both first in Australia).[9] Melbourne's main campus is located in Parkville, an inner suburb north of the Melbourne
Melbourne
central business district, with several other campuses located across Victoria. Melbourne
Melbourne
is a sandstone university and a member of the Group of Eight, Universitas 21 and the Association of Pacific Rim Universities
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Ralph Vaughan Williams
Ralph Vaughan Williams
Ralph Vaughan Williams
OM (/reɪf vɔːn/ ( listen);[n 1] 12 October 1872 – 26 August 1958) was an English composer. His works include operas, ballets, chamber music, secular and religious vocal pieces and orchestral compositions including nine symphonies, written over nearly fifty years. Strongly influenced by Tudor music and English folk-song, his output marked a decisive break in British music from its German-dominated style of the 19th century. Vaughan Williams was born to a well-to-do family with strong moral views and a progressive social outlook. Throughout his life he sought to be of service to his fellow citizens, and believed in making music as available as possible to everybody. He wrote many works for amateur and student performance
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Michael Tippett
Sir
Sir
Michael Kemp Tippett OM CH CBE (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was an English composer who rose to prominence during and immediately after the Second World War. In his lifetime he was sometimes ranked with his contemporary Benjamin Britten
Benjamin Britten
as one of the leading British composers of the 20th century. Among his best-known works are the oratorio A Child of Our Time, the orchestral Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli, and the opera The Midsummer Marriage. Tippett's talent developed slowly. He withdrew or destroyed his earliest compositions, and was 30 before any of his works were published. Until the mid-to-late 1950s his music was broadly lyrical in character, before changing to a more astringent and experimental style. New influences, including those of jazz and blues after his first visit to America in 1965, became increasingly evident in his compositions
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Presteigne
Presteigne
Presteigne
(/prɛsˈtiːn/; Welsh: Llanandras (the church of St. Andrew)) is a town and community in Powys, Wales. It was the county town of the historic county of Radnorshire. Despite lying on a minor B road the town has, in common with several other towns close to the Wales-England border, assumed the motto, "Gateway to Wales". The town sits on the south bank of the River Lugg, which forms the England– Wales
Wales
border as it passes the town — the border effectively wraps around three sides of the town (north, east and south). Nearby towns are Kington to the south and Knighton to the north, and surrounding villages include Norton and Stapleton
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John Corigliano
John Paul Corigliano[1] (born 16 February 1938) is an American composer of classical music. His scores, now numbering over one hundred, have won him the Pulitzer Prize, five Grammy Awards, Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition, and an Oscar. He is a distinguished professor of music at Lehman College
Lehman College
and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
City University of New York
and on the composition faculty at the Juilliard School.Contents1 Biography1.1 Before 1964 1.2 1964–1987 1.3 1987–present2 Music 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Before 1964[edit] The Italian-American Corigliano was born in New York City
New York City
to a musical family
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Joseph Haydn
(Franz) Joseph Haydn[n 1] (/ˈhaɪdən/; German: [ˈjoːzɛf ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 31 March[n 2] 1732 – 31 May 1809) was an Austrian composer of the Classical period. He was instrumental in the development of chamber music such as the piano trio[2] and his contributions to musical form have earned him the epithets "Father of the Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet".[3] Haydn spent much of his career as a court musician for the wealthy Esterházy
Esterházy
family at their remote estate
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University College, Cardiff
Cardiff
Cardiff
University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a public research university in Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Founded in 1883 as the University College of South Wales
Wales
and Monmouthshire, it became one of the founding colleges of the University of Wales
Wales
in 1893, and in 1997 received (but held in abeyance) its own degree-awarding powers. It merged with the University of Wales
Wales
Institute of Science and Technology (UWIST) in 1988. The college adopted the public name of Cardiff
Cardiff
University in 1999, and in 2005 this became its legal name when it became an independent university awarding its own degrees. It is the third oldest university institution in Wales
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University Of West London
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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University Of Cincinnati
The University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati
(commonly referred to as UC or Cincinnati) is a comprehensive public research university in Cincinnati, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio, and a part of the University System of Ohio. Founded in 1819 as Cincinnati
Cincinnati
College, it is the oldest institution of higher education in Cincinnati
Cincinnati
and has an annual enrollment of over 44,000 students, making it the second largest[7] university in Ohio and one of the 50 largest universities in the United States.[8] In the 2010 survey by Times Higher Education (UK), the university was ranked in the top 100 universities in North America and as one of the top 250 in the world.[9] Beginning with the 2011 edition of the U.S
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Antoni Gaudí
Antoni Gaudí
Antoni Gaudí
i Cornet (Catalan pronunciation: [ənˈtɔni ɣəwˈði]; 25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) was an architect. He is the best known practitioner of Catalan Modernism. Gaudí's works have a highly individualized, and one-of-a-kind style. Most are located in Barcelona, including his main work, the church of the Sagrada Família. Gaudí's work was influenced by his passions in life: architecture, nature, and religion.[3] He considered every detail of his creations and integrated into his architecture such crafts as ceramics, stained glass, wrought ironwork forging and carpentry. He also introduced new techniques in the treatment of materials, such as trencadís which used waste ceramic pieces. Under the influence of neo- Gothic art
Gothic art
and Oriental techniques, Gaudí became part of the Modernista movement which was reaching its peak in the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Béla Bartók
Béla Viktor János Bartók (/ˈbeɪlə ˈbɑːrtɒk/; Hungarian: [ˈbeːlɒ ˈbɒrtoːk]; 25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and an ethnomusicologist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Liszt are regarded as Hungary's greatest composers (Gillies 2001)
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Sergei Rachmaninoff
Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff[a][b] (1 April [O.S. 20 March] 1873 – 28 March 1943) was a Russian pianist, composer, and conductor of the late Romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular in the Romantic repertoire. Born into a musical family, Rachmaninoff took up the piano at age four. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory
Moscow Conservatory
in 1892 having already composed several piano and orchestral pieces. In 1897, following the negative critical reaction to his Symphony
Symphony
No. 1, Rachmaninoff entered a four-year depression and composed little until successful therapy allowed him to complete his enthusiastically received Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1901
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Alan Rawsthorne
Alan Rawsthorne (2 May 1905 – 24 July 1971) was a British composer. He was born in Haslingden, Lancashire, and is buried in Thaxted churchyard in Essex.Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Family 4 Compositions4.1 Ballet 4.2 Orchestral 4.3 Concertante 4.4 Chamber 4.5 Instrumental 4.6 Piano 4.7 Vocal orchestral 4.8 Choral 4.9 Vocal5 References 6 External linksEarly years[edit] Alan Rawsthorne was born in Deardengate House, Haslingden, Lancashire (Anon. 2015a), to Hubert Rawsthorne (1868–1943), a well-off medical doctor, and his wife, Janet Bridge (1877/8–1927) (McCabe 2004). Despite what appears to have been a happy and affectionate family life with his parents and elder sister, Barbara (the only sibling), in beautiful Lancashire countryside, as a boy Rawsthorne suffered from fragile health (McCabe 2004; Green 1971)
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