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John Logie Baird
John Logie Baird
John Logie Baird
FRSE (/ˈloʊɡi bɛərd/;[1] 13 August 1888 – 14 June 1946) was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television, demonstrating the first working television system on 26 January 1926, and inventor of both the first publicly demonstrated colour television system, and the first purely electronic colour television picture tube.[2][3][4][5] In 1928 the Baird Television Development Company achieved the first transatlantic television transmission.[4] Baird's early technological successes and his role in the practical introduction of broadcast telev
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Coliseum Theatre
The London
London
Coliseum (also known as the Coliseum Theatre) is a theatre in St. Martin's Lane, Westminster, built as one of London's largest and most luxurious "family" variety theatres. Opened on 24 December 1904 as the London
London
Coliseum Theatre of Varieties, it was designed by the theatrical architect Frank Matcham
Frank Matcham
for the impresario Oswald Stoll.[1] Their ambition was to build the largest and finest music hall, described as the "people's palace of entertainment" of its age.[2] At the time of construction, the Coliseum was the only theatre in Europe to provide lifts for taking patrons to the upper levels of the house, and was the first theatre in England to have a triple revolve installed on its stage
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Church Of Scotland
The Church of Scotland
Scotland
(Scots: The Scots Kirk, Scottish Gaelic: Eaglais na h-Alba), known informally by its Scots language
Scots language
name, the Kirk, is the national church of Scotland.[4] Protestant
Protestant
and Presbyterian, its longstanding decision to respect "liberty of opinion in points which do not enter into the substance of the Faith"[5] means it is tolerant of a variety of theological positions, including those who would term themselves conservative and liberal in their doctrine, ethics and interpretation of Scripture. The Church of Scotland
Scotland
traces its roots back to the beginnings of Christianity in Scotland, but its identity is principally shaped by the Reformation of 1560
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Epsom Derby
The Derby Stakes, officially the Investec
Investec
Derby, popularly known as The Derby, is a Group 1 flat horse race in England open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies. It is run at Epsom Downs Racecourse in Surrey over a distance of one mile, four furlongs and 6 yards (2,420 metres), on the first Saturday of June each year.[1] It is Britain's richest horse race, and the most prestigious of the five Classics. It is sometimes referred to as the "Blue Riband" of the turf. The race serves as the middle leg of the Triple Crown, preceded by the 2000 Guineas and followed by the St Leger, although the feat of winning all three is now rarely attempted. The name "Derby" has become synonymous with great races all over the world, and as such has been borrowed many times, notably by the Kentucky Derby
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Crossroads (soap Opera)
Original Series: 4510 Revived Series: 320 Total: 4830ProductionLocation(s) Broad Street Studios, Birmingham (1964–1988) Carlton Studios, Nottingham (2001–2003)Running time 30 minutes (including adverts)Production company(s) ATV (1964–1981) Central Independent Television (1982–1988) Carlton Television (2001–2003)ReleaseOriginal network ITVOriginal release 2 November 1964 (1964-11-02) – 30 May 2003 (2003-05-30)External linksWebsiteCrossroads is a British television
British television
soap opera that ran on ITV over two periods – the original 1964 to 1988 run, followed by a short revival from 2001 to 2003. Set in a fictional motel (hotel, in the revival) in the Midlands, Crossroads became a byword for cheap production values, particularly in the 1970s and early 1980s
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Noele Gordon
Joan Noele Gordon (25 December 1919 – 14 April 1985) was a British stage, film, television actress and presenter.[1] She played the role of Meg Mortimer (originally Richardson) in the long-running British soap opera Crossroads from 1964 to 1981.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Early television and film career 3 Crossroads 4 Post-Crossroads 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Gordon's father was an engineer in the Merchant Navy and she was born in East Ham, Essex. She was given the middle name of Noele because she was born on Christmas Day. After attending convent school at Forest Gate, she was taught to dance by Maude Wells and later spent several years living in Southend. She made her first public appearance at the East Ham
East Ham
Palace, and shortly afterwards, sung "Dear Little Jammy Face" at a restaurant in London. After this event, her mother and her aunt were keen for her to begin a stage career
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Commutator (electric)
A commutator is a rotary electrical switch in certain types of electric motors and electrical generators that periodically reverses the current direction between the rotor and the external circuit. It consists of a cylinder composed of multiple metal contact segments on the rotating armature of the machine. Two or more electrical contacts called "brushes" made of a soft conductive material like carbon press against the commutator, making sliding contact with successive segments of the commutator as it rotates. The windings (coils of wire) on the armature are connected to the commutator segments. Commutators are used in direct current (DC) machines: dynamos (DC generators) and many DC motors as well as universal motors. In a motor the commutator applies electric current to the windings. By reversing the current direction in the rotating windings each half turn, a steady rotating force (torque) is produced
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SoHo
SoHo, sometimes written Soho,[2] is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which in recent history came to the public's attention for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, but is now better known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socioeconomic, cultural, political, and architectural developments.[3] The name "SoHo" refers to the area being "South of Houston Street", and was also a reference to Soho, an area in London's West End.[4] It was coined by Chester Rapkin,[5] an urban planner and author of The South Houston Industrial Area study,[6] also known as the "Rapkin Report"
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Royal Institution
The Royal Institution
Royal Institution
of Great Britain (often abbreviated as the Royal Institution or Ri) is an organisation devoted to scientific education and research, based in London
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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Arthur Korn
Artur, Art (short form), Arturo, Arttu or/and Artturi (Finnish variant) Arthur
Arthur
pronunciationAnglicised pronunciation of Arthur Arthur
Arthur
is a common masculine given name. Its etymology is disputed, but its popularity derives from its being the name of the legendary hero King Arthur. Art and Artie are diminutive forms of the name
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Signal Conditioning
In electronics, signal conditioning means manipulating an analog signal in such a way that it meets the requirements of the next stage for further processing. Most common use is in analog-to-digital converters. In control engineering applications, it is common to have a sensing stage (which consists of a sensor), a signal conditioning stage (where usually amplification of the signal is done) and a processing stage (normally carried out by an ADC and a micro-controller)
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Reflected Light
Reflection or reflexion may refer to:Contents1 Philosophy 2 Science2.1 Mathematics 2.2 Computers3 Art 4 Film and TV and games 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 See alsoPhilosophy[edit]Self-reflectionScience[edit]Reflection (physics), a common wave phenomenonSpecular reflection, reflection from a smooth surfaceMirror image, a reflection in a mirror or in waterSignal reflection, in signal transmissionElastic scattering, a process in nuclear and particle physics Reflection nebula, a nebula that is extended and has no boundaries Reflection seismology ( seismic reflection )Mathematics[edit]Point reflection, a reflection across a point Reflection (mathematics), a transformation of a space Reflection formula, a relation in a functionComputers[edit]Reflection (computer graphics), simulation of reflective surfaces Reflection (computer programming), a program that modifies its
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Argyll And Bute
Argyll and Bute
Argyll and Bute
(Scottish Gaelic: Earra-Ghàidheal agus Bòd, pronounced [ɛrˠəˈɣɛːəlˠ̪ akəs̪ pɔːtʲ]) is both one of 32 unitary authority council areas and a lieutenancy area in Scotland. The administrative centre for the council area is in Lochgilphead. Argyll and Bute
Argyll and Bute
covers the second largest administrative area of any Scottish council. The council area adjoins those of Highland, Perth and Kinross, Stirling and West Dunbartonshire. Its border runs through Loch
Loch
Lomond. The present council area was created in 1996, when it was carved out of the Strathclyde
Strathclyde
region, which was a two-tier local government region of 19 districts, created in 1975. Argyll and Bute
Argyll and Bute
merged the existing Argyll and Bute
Argyll and Bute
district and one ward of the Dumbarton district
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College Graduate
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
or higher is a commonly used term by the United States Census Bureau and other U.S. government agencies on the federal as well as state and local level. The term describes the portion of the population that has either a bachelor's degree or a higher degree such as a master's or doctorate degree
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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