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John Logie Baird
JOHN LOGIE BAIRD FRSE (/ˈloʊɡi bɛərd/ ; 14 August 1888 – 14 June 1946) was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television , demonstrating the first working television system on 26 January 1926, and inventor of both the first publicly demonstrated colour television system, and the first purely electronic colour television picture tube. In 1928 the Baird Television Development Company achieved the first transatlantic television transmission. Baird's early technological successes and his role in the practical introduction of broadcast television for home entertainment have earned him a prominent place in television's history. Baird was ranked number 44 in the BBC
BBC
's list of the 100 Greatest Britons following a UK-wide vote in 2002
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Reflected Light
REFLECTION is the change in direction of a wavefront at an interface between two different media so that the wavefront returns into the medium from which it originated. Common examples include the reflection of light , sound and water waves . The law of reflection says that for specular reflection the angle at which the wave is incident on the surface equals the angle at which it is reflected. Mirrors exhibit specular reflection. In acoustics , reflection causes echoes and is used in sonar . In geology, it is important in the study of seismic waves . Reflection is observed with surface waves in bodies of water. Reflection is observed with many types of electromagnetic wave , besides visible light . Reflection of VHF and higher frequencies is important for radio transmission and for radar . Even hard X-rays and gamma rays can be reflected at shallow angles with special "grazing" mirrors
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Signal Conditioning
In electronics, SIGNAL CONDITIONING means manipulating an analog signal in such a way that it meets the requirements of the next stage for further processing. Most common use is in analog-to-digital converters . In control engineering applications, it is common to have a sensing stage (which consists of a sensor ), a signal conditioning stage (where usually amplification of the signal is done) and a processing stage (normally carried out by an ADC and a micro-controller ). Operational amplifiers
Operational amplifiers
(op-amps) are commonly employed to carry out the amplification of the signal in the signal conditioning stage
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College Graduate
BACHELOR\'S DEGREE OR HIGHER is a commonly used term by the United States Census Bureau and other U.S. government agencies on the federal as well as state and local level. The term describes the portion of the population that has either a bachelor's degree or a higher degree such as a master's or doctorate degree. In 2013, 31.66% of the population over 25 years old in the United States had a bachelor's degree or higher. The term is sometimes used as a synonym for "college graduate" as it includes not only those with a bachelor's degree but all others who have completed a degree requiring more than four years of credits. While the term is sometimes used interchangeably with the term college graduate, it excludes those with an associate degree, as this college degree only requires two years' worth of units and is thus lower than bachelor's degree
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First World War
Allied victory * Central Power 's victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front * Fall of the German , Russian , Ottoman , and Austro-Hungarian empires * Russian Civil War and foundation of Soviet Union
Soviet Union
* Formation of new countries in Europe and the Middle East * Transfer of German colonies and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers * Establishment of the League of Nations
League of Nations
. (more..
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Church Of Scotland
The CHURCH OF SCOTLAND (Scots : The Scots Kirk, Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Eaglais na h-Alba), known informally by its Scots language
Scots language
name, THE KIRK, is the national church of Scotland
Scotland
. Protestant
Protestant
and Presbyterian
Presbyterian
, its longstanding decision to respect "liberty of opinion in points which do not enter into the substance of the Faith" means it is tolerant of a variety of theological positions, including those who would term themselves conservative and liberal in their doctrine, ethics and interpretation of Scripture. The Church of Scotland
Scotland
traces its roots back to the beginnings of Christianity in Scotland
Scotland
, but its identity is principally shaped by the Reformation of 1560
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Glasgow
GLASGOW (/ˈɡlɑːzɡoʊ, ˈɡlɑːs-, ˈɡlæz-, ˈɡlæs-/ ; Scots : Glesga /ˈɡlezɡə/; Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Glaschu ) is the largest city in Scotland
Scotland
, and third-largest in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. Historically part of Lanarkshire
Lanarkshire
, the city now forms the Glasgow
Glasgow
City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland
Scotland
; the local authority is Glasgow City Council . Glasgow
Glasgow
is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands . Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow
Glasgow
grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde
River Clyde
to become the largest seaport in Britain
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Arthur Korn
ARTHUR KORN (May 20, 1870, Breslau
Breslau
, Germany
Germany
– December 21/December 22, 1945, Jersey City, New Jersey
Jersey City, New Jersey
) was a German physicist , mathematician and inventor . He was involved in the development of the fax machine , specifically the transmission of photographs or telephotography , known as the Bildetelegraph, related to early attempts at developing a practical mechanical television system. CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Telecommunication pioneer * 3 Works * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links LIFEKorn was the son of Jewish
Jewish
Moritz and Malwine Schottlaender. He attended gymnasia in Breslau
Breslau
and Berlin
Berlin
. He then studied physics and mathematics in Leipzig at the age of 15, from where he graduated in 1890
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The Times
THE TIMES is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title THE DAILY UNIVERSAL REGISTER, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK , itself wholly owned by News Corp
News Corp
. The Times
The Times
and The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
do not share editorial staff, were founded independently and have only had common ownership since 1967
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Epsom Derby
The DERBY STAKES, officially the INVESTEC DERBY, popularly known as THE DERBY, is a Group 1 flat horse race in England open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies . It is run at Epsom Downs Racecourse in Surrey over a distance of one mile, four furlongs and 6 yards (2,420 metres), on the first Saturday of June each year. It is Britain's richest horse race, and the most prestigious of the five Classics . It is sometimes referred to as the "Blue Riband" of the turf. The race serves as the middle leg of the Triple Crown , preceded by the 2000 Guineas and followed by the St Leger , although the feat of winning all three is now rarely attempted. The name "Derby" has become synonymous with great races all over the world, and as such has been borrowed many times, notably by the Kentucky Derby . However, the Derby run at Epsom is the original. It is one of Britain's great national sporting events and has a large worldwide TV audience
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Coliseum Theatre
The LONDON COLISEUM (also known as the COLISEUM THEATRE) is a theatre in St. Martin\'s Lane , Westminster , built as one of London
London
's largest and most luxurious "family" variety theatres . Opened on 24 December 1904 as the LONDON COLISEUM THEATRE OF VARIETIES, it was designed by the theatrical architect Frank Matcham
Frank Matcham
for the impresario Oswald Stoll
Oswald Stoll
. Their ambition was to build the largest and finest music hall , described as the "people's palace of entertainment" of its age. At the time of construction, the Coliseum was the only theatre in Europe to provide lifts for taking patrons to the upper levels of the house, and was the first theatre in England to have a triple revolve installed on its stage. The theatre has 2,359 seats making it the largest theatre in London
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Milwaukee, Wisconsin
US: 31st WI: 1st • DENSITY 6,187.19/sq mi (2,388.90/km2) • URBAN 1,376,476 (US: 35th ) • METRO 1,572,245 (US: 39th ) • CSA 2,043,904 (US: 29th ) DEMONYM(S) Milwaukeean TIME ZONE CST ( UTC-6 ) • SUMMER (DST ) CDT ( UTC-5
UTC-5
) ZIP CODE 532XX AREA CODE(S) 414 FIPS CODE 55-53000 GNIS FEATURE ID 1577901 MAJOR AIRPORT General Mitchell International Airport (MKE) WEBSITE city.milwaukee.govMILWAUKEE (/mᵻlˈwɔːki/ , locally /ˈmwɔːki/ ) is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and the fifth-largest city in the Midwestern United States . The county seat of Milwaukee County , it is on Lake Michigan 's western shore. Ranked by estimated 2014 population, Milwaukee was the 31st largest city in the United States. The city's estimated population in 2015 was 600,155
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SoHo
SOHO, sometimes written SOHO, is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan
Manhattan
, New York City
New York City
, which in recent history came to the public's attention for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, but is now better known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification , encompassing socioeconomic , cultural, political, and architectural developments. The name "SoHo" refers to the area being "SOuth of HOuston Street ", and was also a reference to Soho
Soho
, an area in London
London
's West End . It was coined by Chester Rapkin, an urban planner and author of The South Houston Industrial Area study, also known as the "Rapkin Report"
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Royal Institution
The ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN (often abbreviated as the ROYAL INSTITUTION or RI) is an organisation devoted to scientific education and research, based in London. It was founded in 1799 by the leading British scientists of the age including Henry Cavendish
Henry Cavendish
and its first president, George Finch, the 9th Earl of Winchilsea , for diffusing the knowledge, and facilitating the general introduction, of useful mechanical inventions and improvements; and for teaching, by courses of philosophical lectures and experiments, the application of science to the common purposes of life
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National Library Of Scotland
The NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND (Scottish Gaelic : Leabharlann Nàiseanta na h-Alba, Scots : Naitional Leebrar o Scotland) is the legal deposit library of Scotland
Scotland
and is one of the country's National Collections . Its main base is in Edinburgh
Edinburgh
city centre. The headquarters is on George IV Bridge , between the Old Town and the university quarter. There is also a more modern building (1980s) in a residential area on the south side of the town centre, on Causewayside. This was built to accommodate some of the specialist collections (e.g., map library, science library) and to provide large-scale extra storage. The National Library
Library
of Scotland
Scotland
holds 7 million books, 14 million printed items and over 2 million maps
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Greyscale
In photography and computing , a GRAYSCALE or GREYSCALE digital image is an image in which the value of each pixel is a single sample , that is, it carries only intensity information. Images of this sort, also known as black-and-white , are composed exclusively of shades of gray , varying from black at the weakest intensity to white at the strongest. Grayscale
Grayscale
images are distinct from one-bit bi-tonal black-and-white images, which in the context of computer imaging are images with only two colors , black and white (also called bilevel or binary images ). Grayscale
Grayscale
images have many shades of gray in between. Grayscale
Grayscale
images are often the result of measuring the intensity of light at each pixel in a single band of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g. infrared , visible light , ultraviolet , etc.), and in such cases they are monochromatic proper when only a given frequency is captured
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