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John J. Collins
John J. Collins (born 1946) is the Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism & Interpretation at Yale Divinity School. He is noted for his research in the Hebrew Bible, as well as the apocryphal works of the Second Temple period
Second Temple period
including the sectarian works found in Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls
and their relation to Christian origins.[1] Collins has published and edited over 300 scholarly works, and a number of popular level articles and books.[2] Among his best known works are the Between Athens and Jerusalem: Jewish Identity in the Hellenistic Diaspora (New York: Crossroad, 1983); Daniel in the Hermeneia commentary series (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993); The Scepter and the Star
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Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu Princeton University
Princeton University
PressU.S. Historic district Contributing propertyShow map of Mercer County, New JerseyShow map of New JerseyShow map of the USLocation 41 William Street, Princeton, New JerseyCoordinates 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Coordinates: 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Built 1911Architect Ernest FlaggArchitectural style Collegiate GothicPart of Princeton Historic District (#75001143)Added to NRHP 27 June 1975 Princeton University
Princeton University
Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University
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11Q13
11Q13, also 11QMelch or the Melchizedek document, is a fragmentary manuscript among the Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls
which mentions Melchizedek as leader of God's angels in a war in Heaven against the angels of darkness instead of the more familiar Archangel Michael. The text is an apocalyptic commentary on the Jubilee year of Leviticus 25.[1][2][3] The Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls
contain texts in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek, the language of 11Q13 is Hebrew, date of composition is circa 100 BCE.[4] In the fragmentary passage the term "Elohim" appears a dozen times, mainly referring to the God of Israel, but in commentary on "who says to Zion "Your Elohim
Elohim
reigns" (Isa. 52;7) 11Q13 states that Zion is the congregation of all the sons of righteousness, while Melchizedek is "Your Elohim" who will deliver the sons of righteousness from Belial.[5][6][7][8]11QMelch II..
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Copper Scroll
The Copper
Copper
Scroll (3Q15) is one of the Dead Sea Scrolls
Dead Sea Scrolls
found in Cave 3 near Khirbet Qumran, but differs significantly from the others. Whereas the other scrolls are written on parchment or papyrus, this scroll is written on metal: copper mixed with about 1 percent tin. Unlike the others, it is not a literary work, but a list of locations at which various items of gold and silver are buried or hidden. It differs from the other scrolls in its Hebrew
Hebrew
(closer to the language of the Mishnah
Mishnah
than to the literary Hebrew
Hebrew
of the other scrolls, though 4QMMT
4QMMT
shares some language characteristics), its orthography, palaeography (forms of letters) and date (c
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Damascus Document
The Damascus
Damascus
Document (the Cairo Damascus
Damascus
document, CD) or Damascus Rule is one of the most interesting texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls because it is the only Qumran
Qumran
work that was known before the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It is a composite text edited together from different sections of a larger source, and scholars have attempted to place the different sections in a chronological order to generate a more complete work of the original using evidence from the Dead Sea Scrolls.[1] There were a number of fragments from the scroll found in the Cairo Geniza before the Qumran
Qumran
discoveries
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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4Q521
4Q521 or the 4QMessianic Apocalypse is one of the Dead Sea Scrolls. 4Q521 comprises two larger fragments.[1] The original editor was Jean Starcky,[2] though translation revisions have been proposed by Émile Puech.[3] The text begins:(1) [for the heav]ens and the earth will listen to his Messiah, (2) [and all] that is in them will not turn away from the holy precepts. Be encouraged, you who are seeking the Lord in his service! (4) Will you not, perhaps, encounter the Lord in it, all those who hope in their heart? (5) For the Lord will observe the devout, and call the just by name, .[4]The subject of the text is eschatological[5] and makes connection
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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7Q5
Among the Dead Sea scrolls, 7Q5
7Q5
is the designation for a small Greek papyrus fragment discovered in Qumran
Qumran
Cave 7 and dated before anyone claimed to be able to identify it by its style of script as likely having been written sometime between 50 B.C.E. and 50 C.E. The significance of this fragment is derived from an argument made by Spanish papyrologist Jose O'Callaghan in his work ¿Papiros neotestamentarios en la cueva 7 de Qumrân? (" New Testament
New Testament
Papyri in Cave 7 at Qumran?") in 1972, later reasserted and expanded by German scholar Carsten Peter Thiede
Carsten Peter Thiede
in his work The Earliest Gospel Manuscript? in 1982. The assertion is that the previously unidentified 7Q5
7Q5
is actually a fragment of the Gospel of Mark, chapter 6 verse 52-53
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The Book Of Mysteries
The Book of Mysteries (also known as the Book of Secrets) is an ancient Essene text found in fragmentary form among the Dead Sea Scrolls. The scroll fragments are given the alphanumeric designations of 1Q27 and 4Q299-301.Contents1 Wisdom literature 2 Origins 3 Last days 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksWisdom literature[edit] The Book of Mysteries is closely related to another unnamed wisdom book found among the Dead Sea Scrolls, variously called The Secret of the Way Things Are or the Sapiential Work. In both texts, the term raz occurs frequently. Raz means "mystery" or "secret", and is defined as a type of wisdom or knowledge that is known by God and can only be known by humans by divine revelation.[1] This word often occurs in the phrase raz nihyeh, which can be translated as "the secret of the way things are".[2] The assumption behind The Book of Mysteries is that revelation, not reason, is the key to wisdom
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Society Of Biblical Literature
The Society of Biblical Literature (SBL), founded in 1880 as the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis,[1] is a constituent society of the American Council of Learned Societies (since 1929),[2] with the stated mission to "foster biblical scholarship". Membership is open to the public, including over 8,500 individuals from over 80 countries.[3]Contents1 History 2 Leadership 3 Publications 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] The eight founders of The Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis first met to discuss their new society in Philip Schaff's study in New York City in January 1880. In June the group had their first Annual Meeting with eighteen people in attendance. The new society drew up a constitution and by-laws and discussed several papers. Membership dues were set at three dollars
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