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John Irving
John Winslow Irving (born John Wallace Blunt Jr. on March 2, 1942)[1] is an American novelist and screenwriter. Irving achieved critical and popular acclaim after the international success of The World According to Garp
The World According to Garp
in 1978. Many of Irving's novels, including The Cider House Rules (1985), A Prayer for Owen Meany (1989), and A Widow for One Year
A Widow for One Year
(1998) have been bestsellers. Moreover, he won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay in the 72nd Academy Awards
72nd Academy Awards
(1999) for his script of The Cider House Rules.[2] Five of his novels have been adapted into films (Garp, Hotel, Meany, Cider, Widow)
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Tony Richardson
Cecil Antonio "Tony" Richardson (5 June 1928 – 14 November 1991) was an English theatre and film director and producer whose career spanned five decades. In 1964 he won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Director for the film Tom Jones.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Filmography (as director) 4 Theatre 5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPersonal life[edit] Richardson was born in Shipley, West Riding of Yorkshire
West Riding of Yorkshire
in 1928, the son of Elsie Evans (Campion) and Clarence Albert Richardson, a chemist.[1] He was Head Boy at Ashville College, Harrogate
Harrogate
and attended Wadham College, Oxford, where his contemporaries included Rupert Murdoch, Margaret Thatcher, Kenneth Tynan, Lindsay Anderson
Lindsay Anderson
and Gavin Lambert
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National Book Award For Fiction
National may refer to: Nation or country Nationality
Nationality
– a national is a person who is subject to a nation, regardless of whether the person has full rights as a citizen
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Kurt Vonnegut
Kurt Vonnegut
Kurt Vonnegut
Jr. (/ˈvɒnəɡət/;[1] November 11, 1922 – April 11, 2007) was an American writer. In a career spanning over 50 years, Vonnegut published 14 novels, three short story collections, five plays, and five works of non-fiction. He is most famous for his darkly satirical, best-selling novel Slaughterhouse-Five (1969). Born and raised in Indianapolis, Indiana, Vonnegut attended Cornell University but dropped out in January 1943 and enlisted in the United States Army. As part of his training, he studied mechanical engineering at Carnegie Institute of Technology
Carnegie Institute of Technology
(now Carnegie Mellon University) and the University of Tennessee. He was then deployed to Europe to fight in World War II and was captured by the Germans during the Battle of the Bulge
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Iowa Writers' Workshop
The Program in Creative Writing, more commonly known as the Iowa Writers' Workshop, at the University of Iowa
University of Iowa
in Iowa City, Iowa, is a much-celebrated[1] graduate-level creative writing program in the United States. Writer Lan Samantha Chang is its director. Graduates earn a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree in Creative Writing. It is frequently cited as the best graduate writing program in the country.[2]Contents1 History 2 Organization2.1 Faculty and alumni 2.2 Curriculum and courses 2.3 Podcast3 Pulitzer Prizes won by graduates and faculty3.1 Fiction 3.2 Journalism 3.3 Poetry4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (January 2015)The program began in 1936 with the gathering of poets and fiction writers under the direction of Wilbur Schramm. The workshop's second director from 1941–1965 was Cedar Rapids, Iowa, native Paul Engle
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Beau Bridges
Lloyd Vernet "Beau" Bridges III (born December 9, 1941) is an American actor and director. He is a three-time Emmy, two-time Golden Globe and one-time Grammy Award
Grammy Award
winner, as well as a two-time Screen Actors Guild Award nominee
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Cologne, Germany
Cologne
Cologne
(English: /kəˈloʊn/; German: Köln, pronounced [kœln] ( listen), Ripuarian: Kölle [ˈkœɫə] ( listen)) is the largest city in the German federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine-Westphalia
and the fourth most populated city in Germany
Germany
(after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich). It is located within the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
metropolitan region which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas. Cologne
Cologne
is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southwest of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Dusseldorf
Dusseldorf
and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. Cologne
Cologne
is located on both sides of the Rhine, near Germany's borders with Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
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Mount Holyoke College
Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
College is a liberal arts college for women in South Hadley, Massachusetts, United States. It was the first member of the Seven Sisters colleges, and it served as a model for some of the others. Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
is part of the region's Five College Consortium, along with Amherst College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Amherst. The school was founded in 1837 by Mary Lyon
Mary Lyon
as Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
Female Seminary. Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
received its collegiate charter in 1888 as Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
Seminary and College and became Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
College in 1893. Mount Holyoke's buildings were designed between 1896 and 1960
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Random House
Random House
Random House
is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.[1][2][3] As of 2013, it is part of Penguin Random House, which is jointly owned by German media conglomerate Bertelsmann
Bertelsmann
and British global education and publishing company Pearson PLC.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Acquisition by Bertelsmann 1.3 Merger with Penguin2 Organization2.1 Headquarters 2.2 Imprints 2.3 International branches3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] Random House
Random House
was founded in 1927 by Americans Bennett Cerf
Bennett Cerf
and Donald Klopfer, two years after they acquired the Modern Library imprint from publisher Horace Liveright, which reprints classic works of literature
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George Roy Hill
George Roy Hill (December 20, 1921 – December 23, 2002) was an American film director
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Assistant Coach
In sports, a coach is a person involved in the direction, instruction and training of the operations of a sports team or of individual sportspeople. A coach may also be a teacher.Contents1 History 2 Support staff 3 Association football 4 Baseball 5 American football 6 United Kingdom 7 United States 8 Emotions in Coaching 9 Preparation 10 Game plan 11 See also 12 Notes 13 ReferencesHistory[edit] The original sense of the word coach is that of a horse-drawn carriage, deriving ultimately from the Hungarian city of Kocs
Kocs
where such vehicles were first made. Students at the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in the early nineteenth century used the slang word to refer to a private tutor who would drive a less able student through his examinations just like horse driving.[citation needed] Britain took the lead in upgrading the status of sports in the 19th century
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Robin Williams
Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014) was an American stand-up comedian and television and film actor. Chicago-born, Williams started as a stand-up comedian in San Francisco and Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in the mid-1970s. He is credited with leading San Francisco's comedy renaissance.[5] After rising to fame as an alien called Mork in TV sitcom Mork & Mindy Williams established a career in both stand-up comedy and feature film acting. He was known for his improvisational skills.[6][7] After his first starring film role in Popeye (1980), Williams starred or co-starred in various films that achieved both critical acclaim and financial success, including Good Morning, Vietnam
Good Morning, Vietnam
(1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), Aladdin (1992), The Birdcage
The Birdcage
(1996), and Good Will Hunting (1997)
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Glenn Close
Glenda Veronica "Glenn" Close (born March 19, 1947)[1] is an American actress, singer and film producer. She began her professional stage career in 1974 in Love for Love, and was mostly a New York stage actress through the rest of the 1970s and early 1980s, appearing in both plays and musicals, including the Broadway productions of Barnum in 1980 and The Real Thing in 1983, for which she won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. Her film debut was in The World According to Garp (1982), which she followed up with supporting roles in The Big Chill (1983) and The Natural (1984); all three earned her nominations for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
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Academy Award
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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John Lithgow
John Arthur Lithgow (/ˈlɪθɡoʊ/ LITH-goh; born October 19, 1945) is an American actor, musician, poet, author, and singer. He has received two Tony Awards, six Emmy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, three Screen Actors Guild Awards, an American Comedy Award, four Drama Desk Awards, and has been nominated for two Academy Awards
Academy Awards
and four Grammy Awards.[1][2] Lithgow has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and has been inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame. Lithgow is best known for his television roles as Dick Solomon
Dick Solomon
in the sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun
3rd Rock from the Sun
(1996–2001), Arthur Mitchell in the drama Dexter (2009), and Sir Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
in the drama The Crown (2016), for all of which he won Emmy Awards
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Cameo Appearance
A cameo role or cameo appearance (/ˈkæmioʊ/; often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance or voice part of a known person in a work of the performing arts, typically unnamed or appearing as themselves. These roles are generally small, many of them non-speaking ones, and are commonly either appearances in a work in which they hold some special significance (such as actors from an original movie appearing in its remake) or renowned people making uncredited appearances. Short appearances by celebrities, film directors, politicians, athletes, or musicians are common. A crew member of the movie or show playing a minor role can be referred to as a cameo as well, such as Alfred Hitchcock's frequently performed cameos.Contents1 Concept1.1 Film directors 1.2 Actors and writers 1.3 Real-life people2 See also 3 ReferencesConcept[edit] Originally "cameo role" meant "a small character part that stands out from the other minor parts"
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