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John Eladas
John Eladas
John Eladas
(Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Ἐλαδᾶς; died 914) was a senior member of the Byzantine
Byzantine
court and regent in the early 10th century. Life[edit] He is first mentioned during the reign of Leo VI the Wise (r. 886–912), when he held t
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Byzantine
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Steven Runciman
Sir James Cochran Stevenson Runciman, CH, FBA (7 July 1903 – 1 November 2000), known as Steven Runciman, was an English historian best known for his three-volume A History of the Crusades
A History of the Crusades
(1951–54). His three-volume history has had a profound impact on common conceptions of the Crusades, primarily portraying the Crusaders negatively and the Muslims favourably. Runciman was a strong admirer of the Byzantine Empire, and consequently held a bias against the Crusaders for the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
evident in his work
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Great Palace Of Constantinople
The Great Palace of Constantinople
Constantinople
(Greek: Μέγα Παλάτιον, Méga Palátion; Latin: Palatium Magnum, Turkish: Büyük Saray), also known as the Sacred Palace (Greek: Ἱερὸν Παλάτιον, Hieròn Palátion; Latin: Sacrum Palatium), was the large Imperial Byzantine palace complex located in the south-eastern end of the peninsula now known as Old Istanbul (formerly Constantinople), in modern Turkey. It served as the main royal residence of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine emperors
Byzantine emperors
from 330 to 1081 and was the center of imperial administration for over 690 years
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Palace Of Blachernae
The Palace of Blachernae
Blachernae
(Greek: τὸ ἐν Βλαχέρναις Παλάτιον)[1] was an imperial Byzantine residence in the suburb of Blachernae, located in the northwestern section of Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey)
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Simeon I Of Bulgaria
Simeon (also Symeon)[1] I the Great (Bulgarian: Симеон I Велики, transliterated Simeon I Veliki[2] [simɛˈɔn ˈpɤ̞rvi vɛˈliki]) ruled over Bulgaria
Bulgaria
from 893 to 927,[3] during the First Bulgarian Empire
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First Bulgarian Empire
The First Bulgarian Empire
Bulgarian Empire
(Old Bulgarian: ц︢рьство бл︢гарское, ts'rstvo bl'garskoe) was a medieval Bulgarian state that existed in southeastern Europe
Europe
between the 7th and 11th centuries AD. It was founded circa 681 when Bulgar tribes led by Asparukh moved to the north-eastern Balkans. There they secured Byzantine recognition of their right to settle south of the Danube
Danube
by defeating – possibly with the help of local South Slavic tribes – the Byzantine army led by Constantine IV
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Chalke Gate
The Chalke Gate (Greek: Χαλκῆ Πύλη), was the main ceremonial entrance (vestibule) to the Great Palace of Constantinople in the Byzantine period. The name, which means "the Bronze Gate", was given to it either because of the bronze portals or from the gilded bronze tiles used in its roof.[1] The interior was lavishly decorated with marble and mosaics, and the exterior façade featured a number of statues. Most prominent was an icon of Christ which became a major iconodule symbol during the Byzantine Iconoclasm, and a chapel dedicated to the Christ Chalkites was erected in the 10th century next to the gate
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Byzantine Navy
The Byzantine navy
Byzantine navy
was the naval force of the East Roman or Byzantine Empire. Like the empire it served, it was a direct continuation from its Imperial Roman predecessor, but played a far greater role in the defence and survival of the state than its earlier iteration. While the fleets of the unified Roman Empire
Roman Empire
faced few great naval threats, operating as a policing force vastly inferior in power and prestige to the legions, the sea became vital to the very existence of the Byzantine state, which several historians have called a "maritime empire".[5][6] The first threat to Roman hegemony in the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
was posed by the Vandals
Vandals
in the 5th century, but their threat was ended by the wars of Justinian I
Justinian I
in the 6th century
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Rhaiktor
The rhaiktor (Greek: ῥαίκτωρ, the hellenized form of Latin rector) was a high-ranking court position of the middle Byzantine Empire.Contents1 History and functions 2 List of known holders 3 References 4 SourcesHistory and functions[edit] J. B. Bury
J. B. Bury
assumed that the post was created either under Leo VI the Wise (r. 886–912) or his father Basil I the Macedonian (r. 867–886),[1] but Nicolas Oikonomides restored it in the text of the Taktikon Uspensky of c. 843.[2] The title is also found in seals of the 7th and 8th centuries, but with a different sense; thus a "rhaiktor of Calabria" was the administrator of the local estates of the See of Rome
See of Rome
in Calabria.[3] The Kletorologion of 899 includes the rhaiktor among the "special dignities" (axiai eidikai).[3][4] The exact functions of the office are not clear, but, as J. B. Bury
J. B

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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Zoe Karbonopsina
Zoe Karbonopsina, also Karvounopsina or Carbonopsina, i.e., "with the Coal-Black Eyes" (Greek: Ζωή Καρβωνοψίνα, Zōē Karbōnopsina), was an empress consort and regent of the Byzantine empire. She was the fourth spouse of the Byzantine Emperor Leo VI the Wise and the mother of Constantine VII, serving as his regent from 914 until 919.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Empress 1.2 Regency 1.3 Later life2 ReferencesLife[edit] Zoe Karbonopsina
Zoe Karbonopsina
was a relative of the chronicler Theophanes the Confessor and a niece of the admiral Himerios. Empress[edit] Desperate to sire a son, Leo VI married his mistress Zoe on 9 January 906, only after she had given birth to the future Constantine VII
Constantine VII
at the end of 905
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Follis
The follis (plural folles; Italian: follaro, Arabic: fels‎) was a type of coin in the Roman and Byzantine traditions.Contents1 Roman coin 2 Byzantine coin 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksRoman coin[edit]Caesar Constantius II
Constantius II
on a follis AE3 of Heraclea of the year 325.In the past the word 'follis' was used to describe a large bronze Roman coin introduced in about 294 (the actual name of this coin is unknown [1]) at the time of the coinage reform of Diocletian. It weighed about 10 grams and was about 4% silver, mostly as a thin layer on the surface. However, later studies have shown that this is wrong, and that this coin may have been known as a 'nummus'. The word follis means bag (usually made of leather) in Latin, and there is evidence that this term was used in antiquity for a sealed bag containing a specific amount of coinage
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Magistros
The magister officiorum (Latin literally for "Master of Offices", in Greek: μάγιστρος τῶν ὀφφικίων, magistros tōn offikiōn) was one of the most senior administrative officials in the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the early centuries of the Byzantine Empire. In Byzantium, the office was eventually transformed into a senior honorary rank, until it disappeared in the 12th century.Contents1 History and functions1.1 Late Roman Empire 1.2 Byzantine Empire2 References 3 SourcesHistory and functions[edit] Late Roman Empire[edit] Although some scholars have supported its creation under Emperor Diocletian
Diocletian
(r. 284–305), the office can first be definitely traced to the rule of Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Constantine I
Constantine I
(r
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