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John Dobson (astronomer)
John Lowry Dobson (September 14, 1915 – January 15, 2014) was an amateur astronomer and is best known for the Dobsonian telescope, a portable, low-cost Newtonian reflector
Newtonian reflector
telescope.[2] He was less known for his efforts to promote awareness of astronomy (and his unorthodox views of physical cosmology) through public lectures including his performances of "sidewalk astronomy." Dobson was also the co-founder of the amateur astronomical group, the San Francisco Sidewalk Astronomers.Contents1 Biography1.1 Time at the monastery 1.2 Amateur astronomy 1.3 Death2 Promotion of astronomy2.1 The Dobsonian telescope 2.2 Sidewalk astronomers3 Publications by John Dobson 4 John Dobson in the media 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Dobson was born in Beijing, China. His maternal grandfather founded Peking University, his mother was a musician, and his father taught zoology at the University
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John Dobson (other)
John Dobson is the name of:John Dobson (architect) (1787–1865), British architect John Dobson (amateur astronomer) (1915–2014), popularizer of astronomy and the Dobsonian telescope John Dobson (Canadian politician) (1824–1907), Canadian senator John Dobson (Northern Ireland politician) (born 1929), Northern Irish politician John Dobson (priest), British priest and Dean of Ripon John Dobson (rugby union), South African rugby union coachThis disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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Amateur Telescope Making
Amateur telescope making
Amateur telescope making
is the activity of building telescopes as a hobby, as opposed to being a paid professional. Amateur telescope makers (sometimes called ATMs) build their instruments for personal enjoyment of a technical challenge, as a way to obtain an inexpensive or personally customized telescope, or as a research tool in the field of astronomy
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Geranium
See list. Geranium
Geranium
is a genus of 422 species of flowering annual, biennial, and perennial plants that are commonly known as the cranesbills. They are found throughout the temperate regions of the world and the mountains of the tropics, but mostly in the eastern part of the Mediterranean region. The long, palmately cleft leaves are broadly circular in form. The flowers have five petals and are coloured white, pink, purple or blue, often with distinctive veining. Geraniums will grow in any soil as long as it is not waterlogged. Propagation is by semiripe cuttings in summer, by seed, or by division in autumn or spring. The genus name is derived from the Greek γέρανος (géranos) or γερανός (geranós) ‘crane’. The English name ‘cranesbill’ derives from the appearance of the fruit capsule of some of the species
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Mirror
A mirror is an object that reflects light in such a way that, for incident light in some range of wavelengths, the reflected light preserves many or most of the detailed physical characteristics of the original light, called specular reflection. This is different from other light-reflecting objects that do not preserve much of the original wave signal other than color and diffuse reflected light, such as flat-white paint. The most familiar type of mirror is the plane mirror, which has a flat surface. Curved mirrors are also used, to produce magnified or diminished images or focus light or simply distort the reflected image. Mirrors are commonly used for personal grooming or admiring oneself (where they are also called looking-glasses), for viewing the area behind and on the sides on motor vehicles while driving, for decoration, and architecture. Mirrors are also used in scientific apparatus such as telescopes and lasers, cameras, and industrial machinery
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Vedanta Society Of Southern California
The Vedanta
Vedanta
Society of Southern California, with its headquarters in Hollywood, was founded in 1930 by Swami Prabhavananda. The society is a branch of the Ramakrishna
Ramakrishna
Order, and maintains subcenters in Pasadena, Santa Barbara, San Diego, and Trabuco Canyon. It also maintains an archive of important materials relating to the society's history and to the early years of the Vedanta
Vedanta
movement in America.Contents1 History 2 Activities 3 Branches 4 External links 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Swami Prabhavananda
Swami Prabhavananda
came to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in 1929 from Portland, Oregon, and formally established the society as a non-profit corporation in 1934. Prabhavananda led the society until his death in 1976. Swami Swahananda took over as head of the society in 1976, and continued as its head until his demise in 2012
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Hollywood
Hollywood
Hollywood
(/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. This densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S
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Big Bang Model
The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the universe[1] from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution.[2][3][4] The model describes how the universe expanded from a very high-density and high-temperature state,[5][6] and offers a comprehensive explanation for a broad range of phenomena, including the abundance of light elements, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), large scale structure and Hubble's law.[7] If the known laws of physics are extrapolated to the highest density regime, the result is a singularity which is typically associated with the Big Bang. Physicists are undecided whether this means the universe began from a singularity, or that current knowledge is insufficient to describe the universe at that time
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Non-standard Cosmology
A non-standard cosmology is any physical cosmological model of the universe that was, or still is, proposed as an alternative to the then-current standard model of cosmology. The term non-standard is applied to any theory that does not conform to the scientific consensus. Because the term depends on the prevailing consensus, the meaning of the term changes over time. For example, hot dark matter would not have been considered non-standard in 1990, but would be in 2010. Conversely, a non-zero cosmological constant resulting in an accelerating universe would have been considered non-standard in 1990, but is part of the standard cosmology in 2010. Several major cosmological disputes have occurred throughout the history of cosmology. One of the earliest was the Copernican Revolution, which established the heliocentric model of the Solar System
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Steady State Theory
In cosmology, the Steady State theory
Steady State theory
is an alternative to the Big Bang model of the evolution of our universe
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Metric Expansion Of Space
The metric expansion of space is the increase of the distance between two distant parts of the universe with time.[1] It is an intrinsic expansion whereby the scale of space itself changes. It means that the early universe did not expand "into" anything and does not require space to exist "outside" the universe - instead space itself changed, carrying the early universe with it as it grew. This is a completely different kind of expansion than the expansions and explosions seen in daily life. It also seems to be a property of the entire universe as a whole rather than a phenomenon that applies just to one part of the universe or can be observed from "outside" it. Metric expansion is a key feature of Big Bang
Big Bang
cosmology, is modeled mathematically with the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric and is a generic property of the universe we inhabit
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Quantum Tunneling
Quantum tunnelling or tunneling (see spelling differences) is the quantum mechanical phenomenon where a particle tunnels through a barrier that it classically cannot surmount. This plays an essential role in several physical phenomena, such as the nuclear fusion that occurs in main sequence stars like the Sun.[1] It has important applications to modern devices such as the tunnel diode,[2] quantum computing, and the scanning tunnelling microscope. The effect was predicted in the early 20th century and its acceptance as a general physical phenomenon came mid-century.[3] Fundamental quantum mechanical concepts are central to this phenomenon, which makes quantum tunnelling one of the novel implications of quantum mechanics
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Stellafane
Stellafane
Stellafane
(Latin for shrine to the stars) is the name of the clubhouse[1] built by the Springfield Telescope Makers club of Springfield, Vermont
Springfield, Vermont
in the early 1920s, and has since come to refer to the club's land and buildings on the summit of Breezy Hill. It also refers to the Stellafane
Stellafane
Convention, a gathering of amateur telescope makers and amateur astronomers (star party) held every year at that location. The property is a National Historic Landmark.Contents1 The clubhouse 2 The convention2.1 Stellafane
Stellafane
East3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksThe clubhouse[edit] The Springfield Telescope Makers grew out of a class on how to make telescopes that was started by Russell W. Porter
Russell W. Porter
in Springfield, Vermont in August 12, 1920
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Order (religious)
A religious order is a lineage of communities and organizations of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with their specific religious devotion, usually characterized by the principles of its founder's religious practice. The order is composed of laypeople and, in some orders, clergy
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Reflecting Telescope
A reflecting telescope (also called a reflector) is a telescope that uses a single or a combination of curved mirrors that reflect light and form an image. The reflecting telescope was invented in the 17th century, by Isaac Newton, as an alternative to the refracting telescope which, at that time, was a design that suffered from severe chromatic aberration. Although reflecting telescopes produce other types of optical aberrations, it is a design that allows for very large diameter objectives. Almost all of the major telescopes used in astronomy research are reflectors. Reflecting telescopes come in many design variations and may employ extra optical elements to improve image quality or place the image in a mechanically advantageous position
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Newtonian Telescope
The Newtonian telescope, also called the Newtonian reflector or just the Newtonian, is a type of reflecting telescope invented by the English scientist Sir Isaac Newton
Sir Isaac Newton
(1642–1727), using a concave primary mirror and a flat diagonal secondary mirror. Newton's first reflecting telescope was completed in 1668 and is the earliest known functional reflecting telescope.[1] The Newtonian telescope's simple design makes it very popular with amateur telescope makers.[2]Contents1 History 2 Advantages of the Newtonian design 3 Disadvantages of the Newtonian design 4 Variation4.1 Jones-Bird5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] See also: History of the telescope Newton's idea for a reflecting telescope was not new
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