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John Dee
John Dee
John Dee
(13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) was an English mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, occult philosopher,[5] and advisor to Queen Elizabeth
Elizabeth
I. He devoted much of his life to the study of alchemy, divination, and Hermetic philosophy. He was also an advocate of England's imperial expansion into a "British Empire", a term he is generally credited with coining.[6] Dee straddled the worlds of modern science and magic just as the former was emerging. One of the most learned men of his age, he had been invited to lecture on the geometry of Euclid
Euclid
at the University of Paris while still in his early twenties
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Bachelor Of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts (BA or AB, from the Latin
Latin
baccalaureus artium or artium baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors
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Philip Sidney
Sir Philip Sidney
Philip Sidney
(30 November 1554 – 17 October 1586) was an English poet, courtier, scholar, and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. His works include Astrophel and Stella, The Defence of Poesy (also known as The Defence of Poetry or An Apology for Poetry), and The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia.Contents1 Early life 2 Politics and marriage 3 Literary writings 4 Military activity 5 Injury and death 6 Works 7 In popular culture 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Born at Penshurst
Penshurst
Place, Kent, he was the eldest son of Sir Henry Sidney and Lady Mary Dudley. His mother was the eldest daughter of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and the sister of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. His younger brother, Robert Sidney was a statesman and patron of the arts, and was created Earl of Leicester in 1618
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Angels
An angel is generally a supernatural being found in various religions and mythologies. In Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
and Zoroastrianism, angels are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between God
God
or Heaven
Heaven
and Humanity.[1][2] Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God's tasks.[3] Within Abrahamic religions, angels are often organized into hierarchies, although such rankings may vary between sects in each religion, and are given specific names or titles, such as Gabriel
Gabriel
or "Destroying angel". The term "angel" has also been expanded to various notions of spirits or figures found in other religious traditions
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Tower (ward)
Tower is one of the 25 wards of the City of London
City of London
and takes its name from its proximity to the Tower of London.[2] The ward covers the area of the City that is closest to the Tower.[3] Prior to boundary changes in 2003, Tower contained all of Great Tower Street and historically was known as "Tower Street" ward. John Leake's 1667 map of the City refers to it as "Tower Street Ward", as does a 1755 map of the ward.[4] However, it lost much ground to neighbouring Billingsgate
Billingsgate
ward in a 2003 review of ward boundaries, including nearly all of Great Tower Street
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Renaissance Neo-Platonism
Platonism, especially in its Neoplatonist
Neoplatonist
form, underwent a revival in the Renaissance, as part of a general revival of interest in Classical antiquity. Interest in Platonism
Platonism
was especially strong in Florence under the Medici.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksHistory[edit] During the sessions at Florence
Florence
of the Council of Ferrara- Florence
Florence
in 1438–1445, during the failed attempts to heal the schism of the Orthodox and Catholic churches, Cosimo de' Medici
Medici
and his intellectual circle had made acquaintance with the Neoplatonic philosopher, George Gemistos Plethon, whose discourses upon Plato
Plato
and the Alexandrian mystics so fascinated the learned society of Florence
Florence
that they named him the second Plato
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Marsilio Ficino
Marsilio Ficino
Marsilio Ficino
(Italian: [marˈsiːljo fiˈtʃiːno]; Latin name: Marsilius Ficinus; 19 October 1433 – 1 October 1499) was an Italian scholar and Catholic priest
Catholic priest
who was one of the most influential humanist philosophers of the early Italian Renaissance. He was an astrologer, a reviver of Neoplatonism
Neoplatonism
in touch with the major academics of his day[citation needed] and the first translator of Plato's complete extant works into Latin. His Florentine Academy, an attempt to revive Plato's Academy, influenced the direction and tenor of the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
and the development of European philosophy.Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 Death 4 Publications 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Ficino was born at Figline Valdarno
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Substantial Form
A theory of substantial forms asserts that forms (or ideas) organize matter and make it intelligible
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Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
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William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley
Baron Burghley
KG PC (13 September 1520 – 4 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I
for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–53 and 1558–72) and Lord High Treasurer
Lord High Treasurer
from 1572. Albert Pollard says, "From 1558 for forty years the biography of Cecil is almost indistinguishable from that of Elizabeth and from the history of England."[1] Burghley set as the main goal of English policy the creation of a united and Protestant
Protestant
British Isles. His methods were to complete the control of Ireland, and to forge an alliance with Scotland. Protection from invasion required a powerful Royal Navy
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Edward Dyer
Sir Edward Dyer (October 1543 – May 1607) was an English courtier and poet.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] The son of Sir Thomas Dyer, Kt., he was born at Sharpham
Sharpham
Park, Glastonbury, Somerset. He was educated, according to Anthony Wood, either at Balliol College, Oxford
Balliol College, Oxford
or at Broadgates Hall (later Pembroke College, Oxford), and left after taking a degree. After some time abroad, he appeared at Elizabeth I's court. His first patron was Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, who seems to have thought of putting him forward as a rival to Sir Christopher Hatton
Christopher Hatton
for the queen's favour. He is mentioned by Gabriel Harvey, along with Sir Philip Sidney, as one of the ornaments of the court. Sidney, in his will, bequeathed his books equally between Fulke Greville and Dyer
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Euclid
Euclid
Euclid
(/ˈjuːklɪd/; Greek: Εὐκλείδης Eukleidēs [eu̯.klěː.dɛːs]; fl. 300 BC), sometimes given the name Euclid
Euclid
of Alexandria[1] to distinguish him from Euclides of Megara, was a Greek mathematician, often referred to as the "founder of geometry"[1] or the "father of geometry". He was active in Alexandria
Alexandria
during the reign of Ptolemy I (323–283 BC). His Elements is one of the most influential works in the history of mathematics, serving as the main textbook for teaching mathematics (especially geometry) from the time of its publication until the late 19th or early 20th century.[2][3][4] In the Elements, Euclid
Euclid
deduced the theorems of what is now called Euclidean geometry
Euclidean geometry
from a small set of axioms
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Sir Christopher Hatton
Sir Christopher Hatton
Christopher Hatton
KG (1540 – 20 November 1591) was an English politician, Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
of England
England
and a favourite of Elizabeth I of England.Contents1 Early years 2 Wealth 3 Death 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly years[edit] Sir Christopher Hatton
Christopher Hatton
was the second son of William Hatton (died 28 August 1546)[1] of Holdenby, Northamptonshire, and his second wife, Alice Saunders, the daughter of Lawrence Saunders (died 1544) of Harrington, Northamptonshire, and his wife, Alice Brokesby, the daughter of Robert Brokesby (died 28 March 1531) of Shoby, Leicestershire, and Alice Shirley.[2][3][4][5][a] Sir Christopher Hatton's early education is said to have been supervised by his maternal uncle, William Saunders (died c. 1583), but otherwise nothing is known of his life until he entered St
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Welsh People
The Welsh (Welsh: Cymry) are a nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history, and the Welsh language. The language, which falls within the Insular Celtic family, has historically been spoken throughout Wales, with its predecessor Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
once spoken throughout most of the island of Great Britain. Prior to the 20th century, large numbers of Welsh people spoke only Welsh, with little or no fluent knowledge of English.[13] Welsh remains the predominant language in parts of Wales, particularly in North Wales
Wales
and West Wales, but English is the predominant language in most parts of the country
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Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
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Pilleth
Pilleth
Pilleth
is a small village south of Knighton in Powys, Wales. It is the site of the ancient church and holy well of St. Mary’s which stands on Bryn Glas Hill overlooking the River Lugg, as it makes its way to Presteigne.Contents1 Name 2 Well and the church 3 Battle of Bryn Glas 4 References 5 External linksName[edit] The earliest reference to Pilleth
Pilleth
is in the Domesday Book, where it is noted as Pilelei. There are various explanations as to the origins of the name:[1]Pwll-y-Llethr – translated from Welsh to The Pit on the Slope, which could refer to the healing well of the church of St
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