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John Cassavetes
John Nicholas Cassavetes (/ˌkæsəˈvɛtiːz/;[1] December 9, 1929 – February 3, 1989) was a Greek-American
Greek-American
actor, film director, and screenwriter.[2] Cassavetes was a pioneer of American independent film, writing and directing over a dozen movies, which he partially self-financed, and pioneered the use of improvisation and a realistic cinéma vérité style. He also acted in many Hollywood films, notably Rosemary's Baby (1968) and The Dirty Dozen
The Dirty Dozen
(1967)
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American Broadcasting Company
The American Broadcasting Company
American Broadcasting Company
(ABC) is an American commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of Disney–ABC Television
Television
Group, a subsidiary of the Disney Media Networks division of The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Company. The network is headquartered on Columbus Avenue and West 66th Street in Manhattan, New York City. There are additional major offices and production facilities elsewhere in New York City, as well as in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and Burbank, California. Since 2007, when ABC Radio (also known as Cumulus Media
Cumulus Media
Networks) was sold to Citadel Broadcasting, ABC has reduced its broadcasting operations almost exclusively to television
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Champlain College
Champlain College
Champlain College
is a private, co-educational undergraduate college in the U.S. city of Burlington, Vermont. Founded in 1878, Champlain offers traditional undergraduate and online undergraduate courses, along with online certificate and degree programs and master's degree programs, in more than 80 subject areas. Champlain enrolls 2,000 undergraduate students from 41 states and 22 countries.Contents1 History 2 Demographics 3 Campus3.1 Burlington, Vermont 3.2 International campuses4 Academics4.1 Undergraduate education 4.2 Rankings4.2.1 Awards4.3 Online programs 4.4 Programs Abroad5 Campus5.1 International campuses6 Student Activities 7 See also 8 Citations 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Champlain was founded in 1878, when G.W. Thompson opened Burlington Business School to prepare young men for “the business cares and responsibilities of life.” In 1884, when E
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Long Island
Coordinates: 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Long IslandNative name: Paumanok[1]Location of Long Island
Long Island
in New YorkGeographyLocation Atlantic OceanCoordinates 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Area 1,401 sq mi (3,630 km2)AdministrationUnited StatesState New YorkDemographicsDemonym Long IslanderPopulation 7,869,820 (2017)Pop
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Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.[1] This damage is characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue by scar tissue.[1] Typically, the disease develops slowly over months or years.[1] Early on, there are often no symptoms.[1] As the disease worsens, a person may become tired, weak, itchy, have swelling in the lower legs, develop yellow skin, bruise easily, have fluid build up in the abdomen, or develop spider-like blood vessels on the skin.[1] The fluid build-up in the abdomen may become spontaneously infected.[1] Other complications include hepatic encephalopathy,
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Greeks
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Greek American
Greek Americans
Americans
(Greek: Ελληνοαμερικανοί, Ellinoamerikanoi) are Americans
Americans
of full or partial Greek ancestry. About 1.3 million Americans
Americans
are of Greek descent,[1] although there are estimates that raise this number to 3 million,[2] and 321,144 people older than five spoke Greek at home in 2010.[13] Greek Americans
Americans
have the highest concentrations in the New York City,[3][14][15] Boston,[4] and Chicago[5] regions, but have settled in major metropolitan areas across the United States. In 2000, Tarpon Springs, Florida
Florida
was home to the highest per capita representation of Greek Americans
Americans
in the country (11%)
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Anthology Series
An anthology series is a radio, television or book series that presents a different story and a different set of characters in each episode or season/series. These usually have a different cast each week, but several series in the past, such as Four Star Playhouse, employed a permanent troupe of character actors who would appear in a different drama each week
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Method Acting
Method acting
Method acting
is a range of training and rehearsal techniques that seek to encourage sincere and emotionally expressive performances, as formulated by a number of different theatre practitioners, principally in the United States, where it is among the most popular—and controversial—approaches to acting.[2] These techniques are built on the Stanislavski's system
Stanislavski's system
developed by the Russian actor and director Konstantin Stanislavski
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Improvisation
Improvisation
Improvisation
is creating or performing something spontaneously or making something from whatever is available. Improvisation, in the performing arts is a very spontaneous performance without specific or scripted preparation. The skills of improvisation can apply to many different faculties, across all artistic, scientific, physical, cognitive, academic, and non-academic disciplines; see Applied improvisation. Musical improvisation
Musical improvisation
is the composition (and simultaneous playing) of music, without prior preparation. Improvisational comedy is a theatre art performed throughout the world and has had on-again, off-again status throughout history. Dance improvisation is frequently used as a choreographic tool. Choreography
Choreography
is also frequently used as a tool for improvisation. Improvisation
Improvisation
also exists outside the arts
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Muscle Memory
Muscle
Muscle
memory has been used synonymously with motor learning, which is a form of procedural memory that involves consolidating a specific motor task into memory through repetition. When a movement is repeated over time, a long-term muscle memory is created for that task, eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort. This process decreases the need for attention and creates maximum efficiency within the motor and memory systems
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Venice Film Festival
The Venice
Venice
Film Festival or Venice
Venice
International Film Festival (Italian: Mostra Internazionale d'Arte Cinematografica della Biennale di Venezia, "International Exhibition of Cinematographic Art of the Venice
Venice
Biennale"), founded in 1932, is the oldest film festival in the world and one of the "Big Three" film festivals alongside the Cannes Film Festival and Berlin International Film Festival.[1][2] The film festival is part of the Venice
Venice
Biennale, which was founded by the Venetian City Council in 1895
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B Movie
A B movie
B movie
or B film is a low-budget commercial movie, but not an arthouse film. In its original usage, during the Golden Age of Hollywood, the term more precisely identified films intended for distribution as the less-publicized bottom half of a double feature (akin to B-sides for recorded music). Although the U.S. production of movies intended as second features largely ceased by the end of the 1950s, the term B movie
B movie
continues to be used in its broader sense to this day
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Crime In The Streets
Streets
Streets
are the plural of street, a type of road. Streets
Streets
or The Streets
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