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John Ambrose Fleming
Sir John Ambrose Fleming
John Ambrose Fleming
FRS[1] (29 November 1849 – 18 April 1945), an English electrical engineer and physicist, invented the first thermionic valve or vacuum tube,[2] and also established the left-hand rule for electric motors.[3] He was the eldest of seven children of James Fleming DD (died 1879), a Congregational minister, and his wife Mary Ann, at Lancaster, Lancashire, and baptised on 11 February 1850.[4] A devout Christian, he once preached at St Martin-in-the-Fields in London on evidence for the resurrection. In 1932, he and Douglas Dewar and Bernard Acworth
Bernard Acworth
helped establish the Evolution Protest Movement. Childless himself, he bequeathed much of his estate to Christian charities, especially those for the poor
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Augustus De Morgan
Augustus De Morgan
Augustus De Morgan
(/dɪ ˈmɔːrɡən/;[1] 27 June 1806 – 18 March 1871) was a British mathematician and logician. He formulated De Morgan's laws and introduced the term mathematical induction, making its idea rigorous.[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Childhood 1.2 University education 1.3 London University 1.4 Family 1.5 Retirement and death2 Mathematical work2.1 Trigonometry
Trigonometry
and Double Algebra 2.2 Formal Logic 2.3 Budget of Paradoxes 2.4 Relations3 Spiritualism 4 Legacy 5 Selected writings 6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Childhood[edit] Augustus De Morgan
Augustus De Morgan
was born in Madurai, India in 1806.[a] His father was Lieut.-Colonel John De Morgan (1772–1816), who held various appointments in the service of the East India Company
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Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowled
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Resurrection
Resurrection
Resurrection
is the concept of coming back to life after death. In a number of ancient religions, a dying-and-rising god is a deity which dies and resurrects. The death and resurrection of Jesus, an example of resurrection, is the central focus of Christianity. As a religious concept, it is used in two distinct respects: a belief in the resurrection of individual souls that is current and ongoing (Christian idealism, realized eschatology), or else a belief in a singular resurrection of the dead at the end of the world
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St Martin-in-the-Fields
St Martin-in-the-Fields
St Martin-in-the-Fields
is an English Anglican church at the north-east corner of Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
in the City of Westminster, London. It is dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours. There has been a church on the site since the medieval period
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Congregational Church
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Alps
The Alps
Alps
(/ælps/; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe,[2][note 1] stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries
Alpine countries
(from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia.[3] The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps
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University College School
University College School, generally known as UCS Hampstead, is an independent day school in Frognal, northwest London, England. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London
London
and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views. According to the Good Schools Guide, the school "Achieves impressive exam results with a relaxed atmosphere". UCS aims to combine the highest standards of academic achievement and pastoral care with outstanding facilities for all-round education with a distinctive liberal ethos. The UCS Hampstead
Hampstead
Foundation is composed of four main entities:"The UCS Pre-Prep" or "The Phoenix" as it was previously known, co-educational for ages 3 to 7 on the Finchley Road site
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Harold Barlow
Harold Everard Monteagle Barlow FRS[1] (15 November 1899 – 20 April 1989) was a British engineer. He was born in Islington, London, the son of Leonard Barlow, an electrical engineer. He entered University College, London where, apart from the World War II years (which he spent ar Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough), he spent most of his working life. He was taught by Ambrose Fleming, who held the Pender Chair there. Barlow went on to succeed Fleming in that chair, and hence also in the post of head of department. Among his students, Barlow supervised Charles Kao, the 2009 Nobel Laureate for Physics, for a doctoral degree.Contents1 Honours and awards 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHonours and awards[edit] In March, 1961 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.[1] His application citation stated that he: " Has made important contributions to the devising of improved measuring techniques at centimetre wavelengths
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Frederick Guthrie
Frederick may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Nobility1.1.1 Anhalt-Harzgerode 1.1.2 Austria 1.1.3 Baden 1.1.4 Bohemia 1.1.5 Britain 1.1.6 Brandenburg/Prussia 1.1.7 Denmark 1.1.8 Holy Roman Empire 1.1.9 Mantua 1.1.10 Naples 1.1.11 Nuremberg 1.1.12 Palatinate 1.1.13 Saxony 1.1.14 Sweden 1.1.15 Württemberg1.2 Other people 1.3 Fictional people2 Places2.1 United States 2.2 Canada3 Other uses 4 See alsoPeople[edit]Frederick (given name), the nameNobility[edit] Anhalt-Harzgerode[edit]Frederick, Prince of Anhalt-Harzgerode (1613–1670)Austria[edit]Frederick I, Duke of Austria (Babenberg), Duke of Austria from 1195–1198 Frederick II, Duke of Austria (1219–1246), last Duke of Austria from the Babenberg dynasty Frederick the Fair (Frederick I of Austria (Habsburg), 1286–1330), Duke of Austria and King of the RomansBaden[edit]Frederick I, Grand Duke of Baden (1826–1907), Grand Duk
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Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
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St John's College, Cambridge
St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge (the full, formal name of the college is The Master, Fellows and Scholars of the College of St John the Evangelist
St John the Evangelist
in the University of Cambridge).[1] The college was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort. In constitutional terms, the college is a charitable corporation established by a charter dated 9 April 1511. The aims of the college, as specified by its Statutes, are the promotion of education, religion, learning and research.[2] The college's alumni include the winners of ten Nobel Prizes, seven prime ministers and twelve archbishops of various countries, at least two princes and three Saints.[3][4] The Romantic poet William Wordsworth studied at the college, as did William Wilberforce
William Wilberforce
and Thomas Clarkson, the two abolitionists who led the movement that brought slavery to an end in the British Empire
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General Electric
General Electric
General Electric
(GE) is an American multinational conglomerate incorporated in New York[5] and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts.[2] As of 2016, the company operates through the following segments: aviation, current, digital, energy connections, global research, healthcare, lighting, oil and gas, power, renewable energy, transportation, and capital which cater to the needs of financial services, medical devices, life sciences, pharmaceutical, automotive, software development and engineering industries.[6] In 2017, GE ranked among the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
as the thirteenth-largest firm in the U.S
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Cambridge University
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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University Of Nottingham
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham
is a public research university in Nottingham, United Kingdom. It was founded as University College Nottingham
Nottingham
in 1881, and was granted a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1948. Nottingham's main campus (University Park) and teaching hospital (Queen's Medical Centre) are on the outskirts of the City of Nottingham, with a number of smaller campuses and sites elsewhere in Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
and Derbyshire. Outside the United Kingdom, the university has campuses in Semenyih, Malaysia
Malaysia
and Ningbo, China. Nottingham
Nottingham
is organised into five constituent faculties, within which there are more than 50 schools, departments, institutes and research centres
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Physicist
A physicist is a scientist who has specialized knowledge in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe. [1][2] Physicists generally are interested in the root or ultimate causes of phenomena, and usually frame their understanding in mathematical terms. Physicists work across a wide range of research fields, spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic and particle physics, to molecular length scales of chemical and biological interest, to cosmological length scales encompassing the Universe
Universe
as a whole
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