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Johann Philipp Reis
Johann Philipp Reis
Johann Philipp Reis
(German: [ˈʀaɪs]; January 7, 1834 – January 14, 1874) was a self-taught German scientist and inventor. In 1861, he constructed the first make-and-break telephone, today called the Reis telephone.Contents1 Early life and education 2 The telephone2.1 Previous experimenters 2.2 Shortcomings 2.3 Publication3 Final days 4 Recognition and technological assessment4.1 Johann-Philipp-Reis Preis (Award)5 Telephone
Telephone
invention controversies 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life and education[edit]Reis' home in Friedrichsdorf, now a museumReis was born in Gelnhausen, Germany, the son of Marie Katharine (Glöckner) and Karl Sigismund Reis, a master baker.[1][2] His father belonged to the Evangelical Lutheran church.[3] Reis's mother died while he was an infant, and he was raised by his paternal grandmother, a well-read, intelligent woman
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Platinum
Platinum
Platinum
is a chemical element with symbol Pt and atomic number 78. It is a dense, malleable, ductile, highly unreactive, precious, silverish-white transition metal. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina, meaning "little silver".[3][4] Platinum
Platinum
is a member of the platinum group of elements and group 10 of the periodic table of elements. It has six naturally occurring isotopes. It is one of the rarer elements in Earth's crust, with an average abundance of approximately 5 μg/kg. It occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits, mostly in South Africa, which accounts for 80% of the world production. Because of its scarcity in Earth's crust, only a few hundred tonnes are produced annually, and given its important uses, it is highly valuable and is a major precious metal commodity. Platinum
Platinum
is one of the least reactive metals
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Interference Proceeding
An interference proceeding, also known as a priority contest, is an inter partes proceeding to determine the priority issues of multiple patent applications. Until the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act
Leahy-Smith America Invents Act
of 2011, it was a unique procedure in the patent law of the United States. Unlike in most other countries which had a first-to-file system, the former first-to-invent system of the U.S
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Francis Blake (telephone)
Francis Blake, Jr. (1850 – 1913) was born in Needham, Massachusetts, the son of Caroline Burling (Trumbull) and Francis Blake, Sr. and died in Weston, Massachusetts. In 1877 Francis Blake invented a carbon microphone for use in the telephone, shortly after Thomas Edison invented a microphone that also used carbon contacts. Blake used a carbon button design that initially would not stay in adjustment, but with later improvements proved to be workable. Alexander Graham Bell hired Blake and put him to work with Emile Berliner who also invented a carbon microphone. The improved Berliner-Blake microphone was standard with the Bell company for many years.[1] Blake worked on the United States Coast Survey from his teenage years through early adulthood (1866-1878)
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Antonio Meucci
Antonio Santi Giuseppe Meucci (Italian: [anˈtɔːnjo meˈuttʃi]; 13 April 1808 – 18 October 1889) was an Italian inventor and an associate of Giuseppe Garibaldi
Giuseppe Garibaldi
(a major political figure in the history of Italy).[1][2] Meucci is best known for developing the first telephone.[3][4] Meucci set up a form of voice-communication link in his Staten Island, New York, home that connected the second-floor bedroom to his laboratory.[5] He submitted a patent caveat for his telephonic device to the U.S. Patent Office in 1871, but there was no mention of electromagnetic transmission of vocal sound in his caveat
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United States Patent And Trademark Office
The United States
United States
Patent
Patent
and Trademark
Trademark
Office (USPTO) is an agency in the U.S. Department of Commerce that issues patents to inventors and businesses for their inventions, and trademark registration for product and intellectual property identification. The USPTO
USPTO
is "unique among federal agencies because it operates solely on fees collected by its users, and not on taxpayer dollars".[2] Its "operating structure is like a business in that it receives requests for services—applications for patents and trademark registrations—and charges fees projected to cover the cost of performing the services [it] provide[s]".[2][3] The USPTO
USPTO
is based in Alexandria, Virginia, after a 2005 move from the Crystal City area of neighboring Arlington, Virginia
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Canadian Parliament
Initially assumed some jurisdiction from:Parliament of the Province of Canada General Assembly of Nova Scotia New Brunswick
New Brunswick
LegislatureLater added some jurisdiction from:Hudson's Bay Company Legislature
Legislature

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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Science Museum (London)
3,251,000 (2017)[1]Ranked 6th nationallyDirector Ian BlatchfordPublic transit access South KensingtonWebsite sciencemuseum.org.ukScience Museum GroupNational Media Museum National Railway MuseumShildon Locomotion MuseumScience and Industry Science MuseumDana Library and Research Centre Science Museum at WroughtonThe Science Museum is a major museum on Exhibition Road
Exhibition Road
in South Kensington, London. It was founded in 1857 and today is one of the city's major tourist attractions, attracting 3.3 million visitors annually.[2] Like other publicly funded national museums in the United Kingdom, the Science Museum does not charge visitors for admission. Temporary exhibitions, however, may incur an admission fee
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Curriculum Vitae
A curriculum vitae (English: /kəˈrɪkjʊləm ˈviːtaɪ, -ˈwiːtaɪ, -ˈvaɪtiː/)[1][2] (often shortened CV or vita) is a written overview of a person's experience and other qualifications for a job opportunity. It is akin to a résumé in North America. In some countries, a CV is typically the first item that a potential employer encounters regarding the job seeker and is typically used to screen applicants, often followed by an interview. CVs may also be requested for applicants to postsecondary programs, scholarships, grants and bursaries. In the 2010s, some applicants provide an electronic text of their CV to employers using email, an online employment website or using a job-oriented social networking service' website, such as LinkedIn.Contents1 Contents 2 Etymology, spellings and pronunciation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksContents[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Gießen
Giessen, spelled Gießen in German (German pronunciation: [ˈɡiːsn̩]), is a town in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hesse, capital of both the district of Giessen
Giessen
and the administrative region of Giessen
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Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
(TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
(MTB).[1] Tuberculosis
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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