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Johann Mouse
Johann Mouse
Johann Mouse
is the 75th one-reel animated Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
short, created in 1952 directed by William Hanna
William Hanna
and Joseph Barbera
Joseph Barbera
and produced by Fred Quimby
Fred Quimby
with music by Scott Bradley and Jakob Gimpel (who plays the piano in this short) and narration by Hans Conried. The cartoon was animated by Kenneth Muse, Ray Patterson, Ed Barge and Irven Spence, with backgrounds by Robert Gentle
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Writ
In common law, a writ (Anglo-Saxon gewrit, Latin
Latin
breve)[1] is a formal written order issued by a body with administrative or judicial jurisdiction; in modern usage, this body is generally a court. Warrants, prerogative writs, and subpoenas are common types of writ, but many forms exist and have existed. In its earliest form a writ was simply a written order made by the English monarch to a specified person to undertake a specified action; for example, in the feudal era a military summons by the king to one of his tenants-in-chief to appear dressed for battle with retinue at a certain place and time.[2] An early usage survives in the United Kingdom and Canada
Canada
in a writ of election, which is a written order issued on behalf of the monarch (in Canada, the Governor General) to local officials (High Sheriffs of every county in the historical UK) to hold a general election
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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Studios Inc. (abbreviated as MGM or M-G-M, also known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
or simply Metro, and for a former interval known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, or MGM/UA) is an American media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of feature films and television programs. One of the world's oldest film studios, MGM's headquarters are located at 245 North Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills, California.[3] Once the largest, most glamorous, and most revered film studio in Hollywood, MGM was founded in 1924 when the entertainment entrepreneur Marcus Loew
Marcus Loew
gained control of Metro Pictures, Goldwyn Pictures, and Louis B. Mayer
Louis B

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Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ ( listen);[9][10] German: Wien, pronounced [viːn] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of Austria
Austria
and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.8 million[1] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[4] nearly one third of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
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Short Subject
A short film is any motion picture not long enough to be considered a feature film. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
defines a short film as "an original motion picture that has a running time of 40 minutes or less, including all credits".[1] The term featurette originally applied to a film longer than a short subject, but shorter than a standard feature film. The increasingly rare term "short subject" means approximately the same thing. It is an industry term which carries more of an assumption that the film is shown as part of a presentation along with a feature film. "Short" is an abbreviation for either term. Short films are often screened at local, national, or international film festivals and made by independent filmmakers for non profit, either with a low budget or no budget at all. They are usually funded by film grants, non profit organizations, sponsor, or personal funds
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Animated Cartoon
An animated cartoon is a film for the cinema, television or computer screen, which is made using sequential drawings,[Note 1] as opposed to animations in general, which include films made using clay, puppet and other means
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Reel
A reel is an object around which lengths of another material (usually long and flexible) are wound for storage. Generally a reel has a cylindrical core and walls on the sides to retain the material wound around the core. In some cases the core is hollow, although other items may be mounted on it, and grips may exist for mechanically turning the reel.Contents1 Construction 2 Uses 3 Motion picture terminology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksConstruction[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The size of the core is dependent on several factors
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Walt Disney
Walter Elias Disney
Elias Disney
(/ˈdɪzni/;[1] December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966) was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards
Academy Awards
earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry
National Film Registry
by the Library of Congress. Born in Chicago
Chicago
in 1901, Disney developed an early interest in drawing. He took art classes as a boy and got a job as a commercial illustrator at the age of 18
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Kaiser-Walzer
Kaiser-Walzer, Op. 437 (Emperor Waltz) is a waltz composed by Johann Strauss II in 1889. The waltz was originally titled Hand in Hand and was intended as a toast made in August of that year by Austrian emperor Franz Joseph I on the occasion of his visit to the German Kaiser Wilhelm II where it was symbolic as a 'toast of friendship' extended by Austria to Germany. Strauss' publisher, Fritz Simrock, suggested the title Kaiser-Walzer since the title could allude to either monarch, and thus satisfy the vanity of both rulers. The waltz was first performed in Berlin on 21 October 1889. The original cover of the piano edition bore the illustration of the Austrian Imperial Crown. Composition[edit]A quiet march starts the waltz's introduction before a sweeping crescendo heralds the gentle principal melody of the first waltz. As more waltz sections are introduced, the mood remains constantly upbeat and triumphant
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Technicolor
Technicolor
Technicolor
is a series of color motion picture processes, the first version dating from 1916,[1] and followed by improved versions over several decades. It was the second major color process, after Britain's Kinemacolor, and the most widely used color process in Hollywood
Hollywood
from 1922 to 1952. Technicolor
Technicolor
became known and celebrated for its highly saturated color, and was initially most commonly used for filming musicals such as The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Down Argentine Way
Down Argentine Way
(1940), costume pictures such as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and Gone with the Wind (1939), and animated films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) and Fantasia (1940). As the technology matured it was also used for less spectacular dramas and comedies
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Irven Spence
Irven LeRoy Spence (April 24, 1909 – September 21, 1995) was an American animator. He is best known for his work on MGM's Tom and Jerry animated shorts. Spence has been credited variously as Irven Spence, Irvin Spence, and Irv Spence. Spence interest in drawing began in his youth, when he provided cartoons for his high school newspaper (along with classmate William Hanna. Spence's earliest animation work was for Charles B. Mintz's Winkler Pictures, and then for Ub Iwerks, where he worked on the "Flip the Frog" series.[1] After Iwerks Studio folded in 1936, Spence worked at Leon Schlesinger Productions for several years as a member of Tex Avery's animation unit. He followed Avery to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
after Avery left Schlesinger's over a disagreement. Spence provided animation for Avery's first three shorts at MGM, but soon moved over to the Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
unit
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Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
Productions, Inc. (simply known as Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
and also referred to as H-B Enterprises, H-B Production Company and Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
Cartoons, Inc.) is an American animation studio that serves as a division of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Animation. It was founded in 1957 by former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
animation directors and Tom and Jerry creators William Hanna
William Hanna
and Joseph Barbera
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Ed Barge
Edward John "Ed" Barge (August 10, 1910 – September 29, 1991) was an American animator. Barge was born to Alfred Edward and Margaret G. Barge in San Jose, California. In 1916, the family moved to Bakersfield, where his father was employed by the Santa Fe Railroad
Santa Fe Railroad
and Pacific Western Oil
Pacific Western Oil
Co. before retiring in 1954.[1] He was the second of six children;[2] his brother Henry was a photographer for the Bakersfield Californian. Barge attended St. Francis Parochial School and high school in Bakersfield, where he was a baseball and basketball star.[3] He was still living in Bakersfield in July 1936 and was becoming known for his landscape paintings. He married Alice Davis, the daughter of Mrs. B.A
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Silly Symphonies
Silly Symphony is a series of 75 animated short films produced by Walt Disney Productions from 1929 to 1939. As their name implies, the Silly Symphonies were originally intended as whimsical accompaniments to pieces of music. As such, the films usually had independent continuity and did not feature continuing characters, unlike the Mickey Mouse shorts produced by Disney at the same time (exceptions to this include Three Little Pigs, The Tortoise and the Hare, and Three Orphan Kittens, which all had sequels)
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Kenneth Muse
Kenneth Lee Muse (July 26, 1910 – July 26, 1987) was an American animator. He is best known for his work on the Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
series at MGM. Biography[edit] Muse worked briefly at Walt Disney Studio, where he was Preston Blair's assistant on Fantasia (he helped animate "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" scenes).[1] He also provided animation for Pinocchio ("I've Got No Strings" sequence), Fantasia and various Mickey Mouse cartoons such as Mr. Mouse Takes a Trip (1940), Mickey's Birthday Party (1942) and Symphony Hour
Symphony Hour
(1942). Muse left Disney during the 1941 strike there and joined Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's animation department in 1941, along with fellow animators Ray Patterson, Preston Blair, Ed Love, Walter Clinton, and Grant Simmons. He was assigned to the Hanna - Barbera unit, where he remained for 17 years
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