HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Johann Jakob Froberger
Johann Jakob Froberger
Johann Jakob Froberger
(baptized 19 May 1616 – 7 May 1667) was a German Baroque
Baroque
composer, keyboard virtuoso, and organist. Among the most famous composers of the era, he was influential in developing the musical form of the suite of dances in his keyboard works. His harpsichord pieces are highly idiomatic and programmatic. Only two of Froberger's many compositions were published during his lifetime. Froberger forbade publication of his manuscripts, restricting access to his noble patrons and friends, particularly the Württembergs and Habsburgs who had the power to enforce these restrictions
[...More...]

"Johann Jakob Froberger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Baptism
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
[...More...]

"Baptism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Giacomo Carissimi
Giacomo Carissimi (baptized 18 April 1605 – 12 January 1674) was an Italian composer and music teacher. He is one of the most celebrated masters of the early Baroque or, more accurately, the Roman School of music. Carissimi established the characteristic features of the Latin oratorio and was a prolific composer of motets and cantatas. He was highly influential in musical developments in north European countries through his pupils and the wide dissemination of his music.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Music 3 Selected works3.1 Oratorios 3.2 Cantatas 3.3 Motets 3.4 Masses4 In popular culture 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Carissimi's exact birthdate is not known, but it was probably in 1604 or 1605 in Marino near Rome, Italy. Of his early life almost nothing is known
[...More...]

"Giacomo Carissimi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
[...More...]

"Protestant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battle Of Nördlingen (1634)
Decisive Imperial-Spanish victory[1]Destruction of the Swedish army[2]Belligerents Sweden Heilbronn
Heilbronn
League Spain  Holy Roman Empire Bavarian LeagueCommanders and leaders Gustav Horn af Björneborg  (POW) Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Philipp Kratz von Scharffenstein
[...More...]

"Battle Of Nördlingen (1634)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Johann Mattheson
Johann Mattheson
Johann Mattheson
(28 September 1681 – 17 April 1764) was a German composer, singer, writer, lexicographer, diplomat and music theorist. Mattheson was born and died in Hamburg. He was a close friend of George Frideric Handel, although he nearly killed him in a sudden quarrel, during a performance of Mattheson's opera Cleopatra in 1704. Handel was saved only by a large button which turned aside Mattheson's sword. The two were afterwards reconciled and remained in correspondence for life: shortly after his friend's death, Mattheson translated John Mainwaring's Handel biography into German and had it published in Hamburg
Hamburg
at his own expense ("auf Kosten des Übersetzers") in 1761.[1] The son of a well-to-do tax collector, Mattheson received a broad liberal education and, aside from general musical training, took lessons in keyboard instruments, violin, composition and singing
[...More...]

"Johann Mattheson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of Sweden Konungariket Sverige[a]FlagGreater coat of armsMotto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a] "For Sweden
Sweden
– With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b] Thou ancient, thou freeRoyal anthem: Kungssången Song of the KingLocation of  Sweden  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Stockholm 5
[...More...]

"Sweden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lutheran
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is a major branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
(1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the German-speaking territories of the Holy Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Lutheran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Plague (disease)
Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.[2] Symptoms include fever, weakness and headache.[1] Usually this begins one to seven days after exposure.[2] In the bubonic form there is also swelling of lymph nodes, while in the septicemic form tissues may turn black and die, and in the pneumonic form shortness of breath, cough and chest pain may occur.[1] Bubonic and septicemic plague is generally spread by flea bites or handling an infected animal.[1] The pneumonitic form is generally spread between people through the air via infectious droplets.[1] Diagnosis is typically by finding the bacterium in fluid from a lymph node, blood or sputum.[2] Those at high risk may be vaccinated.[2] Those exposed to a case of pneumonic plague may be treated with preventative medication.[2] If infected, treatment is with antibiotics and supportive care.[2] Typically antibiotics include a combination of gentamicin and a fluoroquinolone.[3] The risk of death with treatment is
[...More...]

"Plague (disease)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Wolfgang Ebner
Wolfgang Ebner (1612–1665) was a German baroque composer. He was a Viennese court organist in the latter years of the reign of Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor, and then of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor. Ebner was born in Augsburg. He may have preceded Johann Heinrich Schmelzer as ballet master at the court.[1] He died in Vienna. References[edit]^ The Instrumental Music of Schmeltzer, Biber, Muffat and Their p91 Charles E. Brewer - 2011 Perhaps one of the earliest sets preserved was by Wolfgang Ebner (1612-1665), who was "Hoforganist" beginning in the reign of Ferdinand III, and like Schmeltzer was retained by Leopold I. Ebner probably preceded Schmeltzer as ballet ...Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 49413582 LCCN: nr91018107 ISNI: 0000 0000 8381 0332 GND: 131368311 SUDOC: 157128423 BNF: cb139477415 (data) SNAC: w6jv1wn2This article about a German composer is a stub
[...More...]

"Wolfgang Ebner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
[...More...]

"Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Athanasius Kircher
Athanasius Kircher, S.J. (sometimes erroneously spelled Kirchner; Latin: Athanasius Kircherus, 2 May 1602 – 28 November 1680) was a German Jesuit scholar and polymath who published around 40 major works, most notably in the fields of comparative religion, geology, and medicine. Kircher has been compared to fellow Jesuit Roger Boscovich and to Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
for his enormous range of interests, and has been honored with the title "Master of a Hundred Arts".[2] He taught for more than forty years at the Roman College, where he set up a wunderkammer. A resurgence of interest in Kircher has occurred within the scholarly community in recent decades. Kircher claimed to have deciphered the hieroglyphic writing of the ancient Egyptian language, but most of his assumptions and translations in this field were later found to be incorrect
[...More...]

"Athanasius Kircher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Nuremberg
(/ˈnjʊərəmbɜːrɡ/; German: Nürnberg; pronounced [ˈnʏɐ̯nbɛɐ̯k] ( listen)[2]) is a city on the river Pegnitz and on the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal
Rhine–Main–Danube Canal
in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia, about 170 kilometres (110 mi) north of Munich. It is the second-largest city in Bavaria
Bavaria
(after Munich), and the largest in Franconia
Franconia
(German: Franken). As of February 2015[update] it had a population of 517,498, making it Germany's fourteenth-largest city. The urban area also includes Fürth, Erlangen
Erlangen
and Schwabach, with a total population of 763,854
[...More...]

"Nuremberg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Vocal Music
Vocal music is a type of music performed by one or more singers, either with instrumental accompaniment, or without instrumental accompaniment (a cappella), in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. Music which employs singing but does not feature it prominently is generally considered instrumental music (e.g. the wordless women's choir in the final movement of Holst's The Planets) as is music without singing. Music without any non-vocal instrumental accompaniment is referred to as a cappella.[1] Vocal music typically features sung words called lyrics, although there are notable examples of vocal music that are performed using non-linguistic syllables, sounds, or noises, sometimes as musical onomatopoeia. A short piece of vocal music with lyrics is broadly termed a song. Vocal music is probably the oldest form of music, since it does not require any instrument besides the human voice
[...More...]

"Vocal Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Prima Pratica
Prima pratica (Italian,"first practice") refers to early Baroque music which looks more to the style of Palestrina, or the style codified by Gioseffo Zarlino, than to more "modern" styles. It is contrasted with seconda pratica music. (Synonymous terms are stile antico and stile moderno, respectively). The term prima pratica was first used during the conflict between Giovanni Artusi
Giovanni Artusi
and Claudio Monteverdi
Claudio Monteverdi
about the new musical style.[1] At first, prima pratica referred only to the style of approaching and leaving dissonances. In his Seconda parte dell'Artusi (1603), Giovanni Artusi writes about the new style of dissonances, referring specifically to the practice of not properly preparing dissonances (see Counterpoint), and rising after a flattened note or descending after a sharpened note
[...More...]

"Prima Pratica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
[...More...]

"Florence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.