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Johann Georg Otto Schick
German World War II
World War II
camouflage patterns formed a family of disruptively patterned military camouflage designs for clothing, used and in the main designed during the Second World War. The first pattern, however, Splittertarnmuster
Splittertarnmuster
("splinter camouflage pattern"), was designed in 1931 and was initially intended for Zeltbahn
Zeltbahn
shelter halves. The clothing patterns developed from it combined a pattern of interlocking irregular green, brown, and buff polygons with vertical "rain" streaks. Later patterns, all said to have been designed for the Waffen-SS
Waffen-SS
by Johan Georg Otto Schick, evolved into more leaf-like forms with rounded dots or irregular shapes. Camouflage
Camouflage
smocks were designed to be reversible, providing camouflage for two seasons, whether summer and autumn, or summer and winter (snow)
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Palm Tree
The Arecaceae
Arecaceae
are a botanical family of perennial climbers, shrubs, acaules and trees commonly known as palm trees (owing to historical usage, the family is alternatively called Palmae).[3] They are flowering plants, a family in the monocot order Arecales. Currently 181 genera with around 2600 species are known,[4] most of them restricted to tropical and subtropical climates. Most palms are distinguished by their large, compound, evergreen leaves, known as fronds, arranged at the top of an unbranched stem. However, palms exhibit an enormous diversity in physical characteristics and inhabit nearly every type of habitat within their range, from rainforests to deserts. Palms are among the best known and most extensively cultivated plant families. They have been important to humans throughout much of history
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Cotton Duck
Cotton
Cotton
duck (from Dutch: doek, "linen canvas"), also simply duck, sometimes duck cloth or duck canvas, is a heavy, plain woven cotton fabric. Duck canvas is more tightly woven than plain canvas. There is also linen duck, which is less often used. Cotton
Cotton
duck is used in a wide range of applications, from sneakers to painting canvases to tents to sandbags.[1] Duck fabric is woven with two yarns together in the warp and a single yarn in the weft. Classification[edit] Duck is classified according to weight in a numerical system, with grade 1 the heaviest and grade 12 the lightest variety. Besides this, traditional names exist, which are rarely used today. The classification system used today dates back to the 1920s. A numbered duck classification system was put into effect by the Cotton Duck Association and the Department of Commerce[2] when discrepancies came about with various specifications and qualities of material
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Danish Film Institute
The Danish Film Institute (Danish: Det Danske Filminstitut) is the national Danish agency responsible for supporting and encouraging film and cinema culture, and for conserving these in the national interest. Also known as Filmhuset ("the film house"), it is located in Gothersgade
Gothersgade
in central Copenhagen
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Batesian Mimicry
Batesian mimicry
Batesian mimicry
is a form of mimicry where a harmless species has evolved to imitate the warning signals of a harmful species directed at a predator of them both. It is named after the English naturalist Henry Walter Bates, after his work on butterflies in the rainforests of Brazil. Batesian mimicry
Batesian mimicry
is the most commonly known and widely studied of mimicry complexes, such that the word mimicry is often treated as synonymous with Batesian mimicry. There are many other forms however, some very similar in principle, others far separated. It is often contrasted with Müllerian mimicry, a form of mutually beneficial convergence between two or more harmful species. However, because the mimic may have a degree of protection itself, the distinction is not absolute. It can also be contrasted with functionally different forms of mimicry
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Pea
The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum
Pisum
sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Pea
Pea
pods are botanically fruit,[2] since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae
Fabaceae
such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus. P. sativum is an annual plant, with a life cycle of one year. It is a cool-season crop grown in many parts of the world; planting can take place from winter to early summer depending on location
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Müllerian Mimicry
Müllerian mimicry
Müllerian mimicry
is a natural phenomenon in which two or more unprofitable (often, distasteful) species, that may or may not be closely related and share one or more common predators, have come to mimic each other's honest warning signals, to their mutual benefit, since predators can learn to avoid all of them with fewer experiences. It is named after the German naturalist Fritz Müller, who first proposed the concept in 1878, supporting his theory with the first mathematical model of frequency-dependent selection, one of the first such models anywhere in biology.[a][2][3] Müllerian mimicry
Müllerian mimicry
was first identified in tropical butterflies that shared colourful wing patterns, but it is found in many groups of insects such as bumblebees, and other animals including poison frogs and coral snakes. The mimicry need not be visual; for example, many snakes share auditory warning signals
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Swamp
A swamp is a wetland that is forested.[1] Many swamps occur along large rivers where they are critically dependent upon natural water level fluctuations.[2] Other swamps occur on the shores of large lakes.[3] Some swamps have hammocks, or dry-land protrusions, covered by aquatic vegetation, or vegetation that tolerates periodic inundation.[4] The two main types of swamp are "true" or swamp forests and "transitional" or shrub swamps. In the boreal regions of Canada, the word swamp is colloquially used for what is more correctly termed a bog or muskeg. The water of a swamp may be fresh water, brackish water or seawater
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Oak
See List of Quercus speciesAn oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus (/ˈkwɜːrkəs/;[1] Latin
Latin
"oak tree") of the beech family, Fagaceae. There are approximately 600 extant species of oaks. The common name "oak" also appears in the names of species in related genera, notably Lithocarpus (stone oaks), as well as in those of unrelated species such as Grevillea robusta
Grevillea robusta
(silky oaks) and the Casuarinaceae
Casuarinaceae
(she-oaks). The genus Quercus is native to the Northern Hemisphere, and includes deciduous and evergreen species extending from cool temperate to tropical latitudes in the Americas, Asia, Europe, and North Africa. North America
North America
contains the largest number of oak species, with approximately 90 occurring in the United States, while Mexico
Mexico
has 160 species of which 109 are endemic
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Fallschirmjäger
Fallschirmjäger
Fallschirmjäger
(German: [ˈfalʃɪʁmˌjɛːɡə] ( listen)) is the German word for paratroopers. They played an important role during World War II, when, together with the Gebirgsjäger
Gebirgsjäger
they were perceived as the elite infantry units of the German military. After World War II, they were reconstituted as parts of postwar armed forces of both West and East Germany, mainly as special ops troops. German Fallschirmjäger
Fallschirmjäger
in World War II
World War II
were the first paratroopers to be committed in large-scale airborne operations
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Kriegsmarine
The Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(German pronunciation: [ˈkʁiːksmaˌʁiːnə], War Navy) was the navy of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial German Navy
Navy
of the German Empire
German Empire
(1871–1918) and the inter-war Reichsmarine
Reichsmarine
(1919–1935) of the Weimar Republic
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Michael Madsen
Michael Søren Madsen (born September 25, 1957)[1][2] is an American actor, producer, director, writer, poet and photographer. He has starred in many feature films, several direct-to-video films, television series and video games.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Poetry 4 Photography 5 Personal life 6 Awards 7 Filmography7.1 Film 7.2 Television 7.3 Direct-to-video 7.4 Video games8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Madsen was born in Chicago, Illinois. His mother, Elaine, was a filmmaker and author
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Patent
A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state or intergovernmental organization to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property. The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness
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SS-Verfügungstruppe
The SS-Verfügungstruppe
SS-Verfügungstruppe
(SS-VT) (English: SS Dispositional Troops) was formed in 1934 as combat troops for the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP). They were involved in the German invasion of Poland in 1939. By 1940 these military SS units had become the nucleus of the Waffen-SS. On 17 August 1938 Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
decreed that the SS-VT was neither a part of the police nor the German Wehrmacht, but military-trained men at the disposal of the Führer
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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