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Joe Heller
Joe Heller (born August 17, 1954 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin) was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette
Green Bay Press-Gazette
from 1985[1][2] to 2013,[3] when he was cut as part of a large round of layoffs by Gannett, owner of the Press-Gazette. Before he worked at the Press-Gazette, Heller was the cartoonist for the West Bend Daily News.Contents1 Education 2 Works 3 Awards 4 Organizations 5 Family 6 ReferencesEducation[edit] Heller graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
in 1979 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.[1] Works[edit] His work is regularly reprinted in USA Today, The New York Times,[4] The Washington Post, Newsweek, and the Los Angeles Times. Heller placed his editorial cartoons into a collection in which he titled "Give 'em Heller"
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Oshkosh, Wisconsin
Oshkosh is a city in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, United States, located where the Fox River enters Lake Winnebago
Lake Winnebago
from the west. The population was 66,083 at the 2010 census. The city is located adjacent to and partially within the Town of Oshkosh.Contents1 History1.1 Historic districts2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Transportation4.1 Major highways 4.2 Bus 4.3 Airport5 Government and infrastructure 6 Business and industry 7 Education 8 Culture and entertainment8.1 Sports9 Notable people 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit]Oshkosh on the Fox RiverOshkosh was named for Menominee
Menominee
Chief Oshkosh, whose name meant "claw"[5] (cf. Ojibwe oshkanzh, "the claw").[6] Although the fur trade attracted the first European settlers to the area as early as 1818, it never became a major player in the fur trade
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Editorial Cartoon
An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is a drawing containing a commentary expressing the artist's opinion. An artist who writes and draws such images is known as an editorial cartoonist. They typically combine artistic skill, hyperbole and satire in order to question authority and draw attention to corruption, political violence and other social ills.[1][2]Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Development 1.3 Cartoonist's magazines 1.4 Maturation2 Recognition 3 Modern political cartoons 4 Pocket cartoons 5 Controversies 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit]A Rake's Progress, Plate 8, 1735, and retouched by Hogarth in 1763 by adding the Britannia emblem[3][4]The pictorial satire has been credited as the precursor to the political cartoons in England: John J
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Green Bay Press-Gazette
The Green Bay Press-Gazette
Green Bay Press-Gazette
is a newspaper whose primary coverage is of northeastern Wisconsin, including Green Bay. It was founded as the Green Bay Gazette in 1866 as a weekly paper, becoming a daily newspaper in 1871. The Green Bay Gazette merged with its major competitor, the Green Bay Free Press in 1915, assuming its current title. The newspaper was purchased by Gannett
Gannett
in March 1980.[2] In 1972, an internal labor dispute led to the creation of the Green Bay News-Chronicle by striking workers. In 2004, the News-Chronicle was taken over by Press-Gazette publisher, Gannett, who closed it in 2005. Its sports section includes extensive coverage of the local NFL franchise, the Green Bay Packers
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Gannett Company
Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded American media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean in Greater Washington DC.[3][4] It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation. Its assets include the national newspaper USA Today
USA Today
and the erstwhile weekly USA Weekend. Its largest non-national newspaper is The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, Arizona
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University Of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Normal School (1885–1927) Milwaukee
Milwaukee
State Teachers
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USA Today
USA Today
USA Today
is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company. Founded by Al Neuharth on September 15, 1982, it operates from Gannett's corporate headquarters on Jones Branch Drive, in McLean, Virginia.[3] It is printed at 37 sites across the United States and at five additional sites internationally
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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Newsweek
Newsweek
Newsweek
is an American weekly magazine founded in 1933. Between 2008 and 2012, Newsweek
Newsweek
underwent internal and external contractions designed to shift the magazine's focus and audience while improving its finances. Instead, losses accelerated: revenue dropped 38 percent from 2007 to 2009. The revenue declines prompted an August 2010 sale by owner The Washington Post Company
The Washington Post Company
to audio pioneer Sidney Harman—for a purchase price of one dollar and an assumption of the magazine's liabilities.[3][4] In November 2010, Newsweek
Newsweek
merged with the news and opinion website The Daily Beast, forming The Newsweek
Newsweek
Daily Beast Company, after negotiations between the owners of the two publications. Tina Brown, The Daily Beast's editor-in-chief, served as the editor of both publications
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Association Of American Editorial Cartoonists
The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists (AAEC) is a professional association concerned with promoting the interests of staff, freelance and student editorial cartoonists in the United States, Canada and Mexico. With nearly 300 members, it is the world's largest organization of political cartoonists. The AAEC has filed friend-of-the-court briefs in several cases dealing with freedom of the press, including the 1988 Supreme Court case Flynt v. Falwell (Hustler Magazine v. Falwell). Aside from First Amendment issues, the Association does not take sides in political controversies. Formed in 1957 by a small group of newspaper cartoonists led by John Stampone of the Army Times, the AAEC was created to promote and stimulate public interest in the editorial page cartoon and to create closer contact among political cartoonists
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Green Bay, Wisconsin
Green Bay is a city in and the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin,[7] at the head of Green Bay, a sub-basin of Lake Michigan, at the mouth of the Fox River. It is 581 feet (177 m) above sea level and 112 miles (180 km) north of Milwaukee. The population was 104,057 at the 2010 census.[5] Green Bay is the third-largest city in the state of Wisconsin, after Milwaukee
Milwaukee
and Madison, and the third-largest city on Lake Michigan's west shore, after Chicago
Chicago
and Milwaukee
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Cartoonist
A cartoonist (also comic strip creator) is a visual artist who specializes in drawing cartoons. This work is often created for entertainment, political commentary, or advertising. Cartoonists may work in many formats, such as animation, booklets, comic strips, comic books, editorial cartoons, graphic novels, manuals, gag cartoons, graphic design, illustrations, storyboards, posters, shirts, books, advertisements, greeting cards, magazines, newspapers, and video game packaging.Contents1 History1.1 In the West2 Comics 3 Types of animation 4 Creation 5 Art styles5.1 Tools6 See also 7 References7.1 Works cited8 Further reading 9 External links9.1 Societies and organizations 9.2 CommunitiesHistory[edit] In the West[edit] The English satirist and editorial cartoonist William Hogarth, who emerged In the 18th century, has been credited with pioneering Western sequential art
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Joe Heller
Joe Heller (born August 17, 1954 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin) was the editorial cartoonist for the Green Bay Press-Gazette
Green Bay Press-Gazette
from 1985[1][2] to 2013,[3] when he was cut as part of a large round of layoffs by Gannett, owner of the Press-Gazette. Before he worked at the Press-Gazette, Heller was the cartoonist for the West Bend Daily News.Contents1 Education 2 Works 3 Awards 4 Organizations 5 Family 6 ReferencesEducation[edit] Heller graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
in 1979 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.[1] Works[edit] His work is regularly reprinted in USA Today, The New York Times,[4] The Washington Post, Newsweek, and the Los Angeles Times. Heller placed his editorial cartoons into a collection in which he titled "Give 'em Heller"
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