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Joan Of Arc
Hundred Years War Loire
Loire
Campaign:Siege of Orléans Battle
Battle
of Jargeau Battle
Battle
of Meung-sur-Loire Battle
Battle
of Beaugency Battle
Battle
of PatayMarch to Reims Siege of Paris Siege of La Charité Siege of CompiègneSignature Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
(French: Jeanne d'Arc,[5] IPA: [ʒan daʁk]; 6 January c. 1412[6] – 30 May 1431), nicknamed "The Maid of Orléans" (French: La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
was born to Jacques d'Arc
Jacques d'Arc
and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France
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Archangel
The archangels /ˌɑːrkˈeɪndʒəl/ are angels of high rank. The word "archangel" itself is usually associated with the Abrahamic religions, but beings that are very similar to archangels are found in a number of religious traditions. The English word archangel is derived from the Greek ἀρχάγγελος (arch- + angel, literally chief angel or angel of origin).[1] It appears only once in the New Testament
New Testament
in the phrase 'the archangel Michael' (Jude 9)
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Canonization
Canonization
Canonization
is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints. Originally, a person was recognized as a saint without any formal process. Later, different processes were developed, such as those used today in the Anglican Communion, the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Church.Contents1 Historical development 2 Anglican Communion 3 Catholic Church3.1 Nature 3.2 Procedure prior to reservation to the Apostolic See 3.3 Exclusive reservation to the Apostolic See 3.4 Procedure from 1734–38 to 1983 3.5 Since 1983 3.6 Equipollent canonization4 Eastern Orthodox Church 5 Oriental Orthodox Church 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistorical development[edit] The first persons honored as saints were the martyrs
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Roman Catholic Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
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Women's Army Corps
The Women's Army Corps
Women's Army Corps
(WAC) was the women's branch of the United States Army. It was created as an auxiliary unit, the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) on 15 May 1942 by Public Law 554,[1] and converted to an active duty status in the Army of the United States as the WAC on 1 July 1943. Its first director was Oveta Culp Hobby, a prominent woman in Texas society.[2][3] The WAC was disbanded in 1978, and all units were integrated with male units.Contents1 History1.1 Slander campaign 1.2 Evaluations2 Disbanded 3 WAAC ranks 4 WAC ranks 5 List of directors 6 Women's Army Corps
Women's Army Corps
Veterans' Association 7 Notable WACs 8 Popular culture 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References11.1 Primary sources12 External linksHistory[edit]Pallas Athene, official insignia of the U.S. Women's Army CorpsThe WAAC's organization was designed by numerous Army bureaus coordinated by Lt. Col. Gilman C
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WAVES
The United States Naval Reserve
United States Naval Reserve
(Women's Reserve), better known as the WAVES
WAVES
for the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, was the World War II
World War II
women's branch of the United States Naval Reserve. It was established on 21 July 1942 by the U.S. Congress
U.S. Congress
and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
on 30 July 1942. This authorized the U.S. Navy
U.S. Navy
to accept women into the Naval Reserve as commissioned officers and at the enlisted level, effective for the duration of the war plus six months. The purpose of the law was to release officers and men for sea duty and replace them with women in shore establishments. Mildred H. McAfee
Mildred H. McAfee
became the first director of the WAVES
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Peasant
A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer, especially one living in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
under feudalism and paying rent, tax, fees or services to a landlord.[1][2] In Europe, peasants were divided into three classes according to their personal status: slave, serf, and free tenant. Peasants either hold title to land in fee simple, or hold land by any of several forms of land tenure, among them socage, quit-rent, leasehold, and copyhold.[3] The word "peasant" is—and long has been—often used pejoratively to refer to poor or landless farmers and agricultural workers, especially in the poorer countries of the world in which the agricultural labor force makes up a large percentage of the population
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Sword
A sword is a bladed weapon intended for slashing or thrusting that is longer than a knife or dagger. The precise definition of the term varies with the historical epoch or the geographical region under consideration. A sword consists of a long blade attached to a hilt. The blade can be straight or curved. Thrusting swords have a pointed tip on the blade, and tend to be straighter; slashing swords have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade, and are more likely to be curved. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze
Bronze
Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard
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Armor
Armour
Armour
( British English
British English
or Canadian English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted to an object, individual or vehicle by direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from damage caused by a potentially dangerous environment or action (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.). Personal armour
Personal armour
is used to protect soldiers and war animals. Vehicle armour is used on warships and armoured fighting vehicles. A second use of the term armour describes armoured forces, armoured weapons, and their role in combat
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Calendar Of Saints
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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St. Peter's Basilica
The Papal Basilica
Basilica
of St. Peter
St. Peter
in the Vatican (Italian: Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Latin: Basilica
Basilica
Sancti Petri), is an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture[2] and the largest church in the world.[3] While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
nor the cathedral of the Diocese
Diocese
of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines
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Patron Saint
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.[1][2][title missing][page needed] Catholics believe that patron saints, having already transcended to the metaphysical, are able to intercede effectively for the needs of their special charges.[3] Historically, a similar practice has also occurred in many Islamic lands
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Duchy Of Bar
The County of Bar, from 1354 the Duchy of Bar, was a principality of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
encompassing the pays de Barrois and centred on the city of Bar-le-Duc. Part of the county, the so-called Barrois mouvant, became a fief of the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
in 1301. The Barrois non-mouvant remained a part of the Empire. From 1480, it was united to the imperial Duchy of Lorraine. Both imperial Bar and Lorraine
Lorraine
were ceded to France in 1738
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Beatification
Beatification
Beatification
(from Latin
Latin
beatus, "blessed" and facere, "to make") is a recognition accorded by the Catholic Church
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Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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