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Jim Mutrie
James J. Mutrie (June 13, 1851 – January 24, 1938) was an American baseball pioneer who was the co-founder and first manager of both the original New York Metropolitans
New York Metropolitans
and the New York Giants. His career winning percentage of .611 was a 19th-century record, and remains the second highest by any major league manager with at least 500 wins, trailing only Joe McCarthy's mark of .615. Mutrie, nicknamed "Smilin' Jeems" and "Truthful Jim", was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and grew up playing cricket, first playing baseball at age 16. He played in the minor leagues from 1877 to 1879.[1] In 1880 he moved from New England to New York, where he obtained financial backing from August Belmont
August Belmont
and John B. Day to start the independent New York Metropolitans
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Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases - having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team (fielding team) is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases.[1] A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate (the place where the player started as a batter). The team who scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner. The first objective of the batting team is to have a player reach base safely
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National League
The National League
National League
of Professional Baseball
Baseball
Clubs, known simply as the National League
National League
(NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, it is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later. Both leagues currently have 15 teams. The two league champions of 1903 arranged to compete against each other in the inaugural World Series. After the 1904 champions failed to reach a similar agreement, the two leagues formalized the World Series
World Series
as an arrangement between the leagues
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Find A Grave
Find A Grave is a website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com. It receives and uploads digital photographs of headstones from burial sites, taken by unpaid volunteers at cemeteries
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Roosevelt Island
Roosevelt Island is a narrow island in New York City's East River. It lies between Manhattan Island to its west and the borough of Queens on Long Island to its east, and is part of the borough of Manhattan. Running from the equivalent of East 46th to 85th Streets on Manhattan Island, it is about 2 miles (3.2 km) long, with a maximum width of 800 feet (240 m), and a total area of 147 acres (0.59 km2). Together with Mill Rock, Roosevelt Island constitutes Manhattan's Census Tract 238, which has a land area of 0.279 sq mi (0.72 km2),[3] and had a population of 9,520 as of the 2000 United States Census.[4][note 1] It had a population of 11,661 as of the 2010 United States Census.[1] The island was called Minnehanonck by the Lenape and Varkens Eylandt (Hog Island) by New Netherlanders, and during the colonial era and later as Blackwell's Island
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Cancer
Cancer
Cancer
is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.[2][8] These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread to other parts of the body.[8] Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, and a change in bowel movements.[1] While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes.[1] Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.[8]
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Staten Island
Staten Island
Staten Island
/ˌstætən ˈaɪlənd/ is the southernmost of the five boroughs of New York City
New York City
in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. Located in the southwest portion of the city, Staten Island
Staten Island
is the southernmost part of both the city and state of New York, with Conference House Park located at the southern tip of the island.[2] The borough is separated from New Jersey
New Jersey
by the Arthur Kill
Arthur Kill
and the Kill Van Kull, and from the rest of New York by New York Bay. With a 2017 Census-estimated population of 479,458[1] Staten Island
Staten Island
is the least populated of the boroughs but is the third-largest in land area at 58.5 sq mi (152 km2)
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Elmira, New York
Elmira /ˌɛlˈmaɪrə/ is a city in Chemung County, New York, United States. It is the principal city of the Elmira, New York
Elmira, New York
Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses Chemung County, New York. The population was 29,200 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Chemung County. The City of Elmira is in the south-central part of the county, surrounded on three sides by the Town of Elmira
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Players' League
The Players' National League
National League
of Professional Base Ball Clubs, popularly known as the Players' League (sometimes rendered as Players League), was a short-lived but star-studded professional American baseball league of the 19th century. It emerged from the Brotherhood of Professional Base-Ball Players, the sport's first players' union. The Brotherhood included most of the best players of the National League. Brotherhood members, led by John Montgomery Ward, left the National League
National League
and formed the Players' League after failing to change the lopsided player-management relationship of the National League. The PL lasted just the one season of 1890, and the Boston franchise won the championship. Although known to historians as the Players' League, newspapers often reported the standings with the shorthand titles of "League", "Association" and "Brotherhood"
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Troy Trojans (MLB Team)
Green, orange          ManagersBob Ferguson (1879-1882) Horace Phillips (1879)Major league titlesNational League pennants: 0The Troy Trojans were a Major League Baseball team in the National League for four seasons from 1879 to 1882.[1] Their home games were played at Putnam Grounds (1879) and Haymakers' Grounds (1880–1881) in the upstate New York city of Troy, and at Troy Ball Clubs Grounds (1882) across the Hudson in Watervliet, or "West Troy" as it was known at the time. Overall, the franchise won 131 games and lost 194
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Manager (baseball)
In baseball, the field manager (commonly referred to as the manager) is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager. Duties[edit] The manager chooses the batting order and starting pitcher before each game, and makes substitutions throughout the game – among the most significant being those decisions regarding when to bring in a relief pitcher. How much control a manager takes in a game's strategy varies from manager to manager and from game to game
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August Belmont
August Belmont
August Belmont
Sr. (December 8, 1813 – November 24, 1890) was a German-American politician, financier, foreign diplomat, and party chairman of the Democratic National Committee
Democratic National Committee
during the 1860s, and later a horse-breeder and racehorse owner. He was the founder and namesake of the Belmont Stakes, third leg of the Triple Crown series of American thoroughbred horse racing.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 August Belmont
August Belmont
& Company 2.2 Consul-General of Austria 2.3 Entry into U.S. politics 2.4 U.S
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American Association (19th Century)
The American Association (AA) was a professional baseball major league that existed for 10 seasons from 1882 to 1891. During that time, it challenged the National League
National League
(NL) for dominance of professional baseball. Together with the NL, the AA participated in an early version of the World Series
World Series
seven times. At the end of its run, several franchises of the AA joined the NL. During its existence, the AA was often simply referred to as "the Association" in the media, in contrast to the NL which was called "the League."Contents1 History 2 Pennant winners of the AA 3 American Association franchises 4 Timeline 5 AA presidents 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The American Association distinguished itself in several ways from what it considered to be the puritanical National League
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Cricket
Cricket
Cricket
is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players each on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a target at each end called the wicket (a set of three wooden stumps upon which two bails sit). Each phase of play is called an innings, during which one team bats, attempting to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents bowl and field, attempting to minimise the number of runs scored. When each innings ends, the teams usually swap roles for the next innings (i.e. the team that previously batted will bowl/field, and vice versa). The teams each bat for one or two innings, depending on the type of match
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Joe McCarthy (manager)
Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 – January 13, 1978) was a manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the "Bronx Bombers" teams of the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
from 1931 to 1946. The first manager to win pennants with both National and American League teams, he won nine league titles overall and seven World Series championships – a record tied only by Casey Stengel. McCarthy was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
in 1957.[2] McCarthy's career winning percentages in both the regular season (.615)[2] and postseason (.698, all in the World Series)[2] are the highest in major league history
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Cannonball Titcomb
Ledell Titcomb (August 21, 1866 – June 8, 1950)—often erroneously referred to as "Cannonball" or "Cannon Ball" Titcomb—was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for several teams in the National League and American Association. Born in West Baldwin, Maine, he pitched a total of five seasons, finishing with a 30–29 record and a 3.47 earned run average. Titcomb pitched a no-hitter on September 15, 1890, against the Syracuse Stars, a 7-0 victory. Also, in two games at third base, he fielded all five of his chances cleanly, while putting up a respectable 2.50 range factor
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