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Jiahu Flutes
The Jiahu
Jiahu
gǔdí (贾湖骨笛) is the oldest known musical instrument from China, dating back to around 6000 BC. Gudi literally means "bone flute".Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links7.1 Sample musicHistory[edit] These bone flutes were excavated in 1986 from an early neolithic tomb in Jiahu, Wuyan County, Henan Province, in Central China. They have been dated to 6000 BC. Description[edit] These bone flutes have average dimensions of approximately 20 cm × 1.1 cm (7.9 in × 0.4 in), and are made from the wings of the red-crowned crane. They are open-ended and vary in the number of their finger holes, from one to eight; the 24 holed version has 23 holes in front and one thumb hole in back. Jiahu
Jiahu
bone whistles are much shorter than the flutes, with lengths of 5.7 to 10.5 cm (2 to 4 in), and having only a couple of holes
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Flûte D'amour
The flûte d'amour (Ital: flauto d'amore, Ger: Liebesflöte, translates as: Love Flute) is pitched in either A or B♭ and is intermediate in size between the modern C concert flute and the alto flute in G. It is the mezzo-soprano member of the flute family. It is also sometimes called a tenor flute. [1] Unlike the alto flute, the ratio between the bore diameter and tube length is much the same as in the concert flute, which allows it to have a mellower tone colour but without losing any facility in the top octave. Its lowest sounding note is B♭ (or A). In contrast, the alto flute has a wider bore in relation to its tube length
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Irish Flute
The term Irish Flute
Flute
refers to a conical-bore, simple-system wooden flute of the type favoured by classical flautists of the early 19th century, or to a flute of modern manufacture derived from this design (often with modifications to optimize its use in Irish Traditional Music or Scottish Traditional Music[1])
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Fife (instrument)
A fife /ˈfaɪf/ is a small, high-pitched, transverse aerophone, that is similar to the piccolo. The fife originated in medieval Europe
Europe
and is often used in Fife & Drum Corps, military units and marching bands. Someone who plays the fife is called a fifer. The word fife comes from the German Pfeife, or pipe, which comes from the Latin
Latin
word pipare. The fife is a diatonically tuned instrument commonly consisting of a tube with 6 finger holes and an embouchure hole that produces sound when blown across. Modern versions of the fife are chromatic, having 10 or 11 finger holes that allow any note to be played. Fifes are made primarily of wood, such as: grenadilla, rosewood, mopane, pink ivory, cocobolo, boxwood, maple and persimmon. Fifes are most commonly used in Fife & Drum Corps, but can also be found in Folk Music, particularly Celtic
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Five-key Flute
The five-key flute is a musical instrument once common in school marching bands, and composed of wood with metal keys. It is a transposing instrument, most commonly in Bb, this variant being known as the Bb flute and sounding one tone below the orchestral piccolo. The next most common variant is the Eb flute, sounding a fifth below the Bb flute and used as its bass instrument in band harmonies. It is now often found in British military corps of drums, often playing various regimental marches. As the name suggests, the five-key flute most commonly has five keys, as do many historic 19th century French and German simple system flutes. Simple system keying on wooden tapered bore flutes was the standard orchestral instrument before It was eventually replaced by the Boehm cylindrical bored flute keying system. See Boehm System. It evolved from the baroque one key transverso flute
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Fue
Fue
Fue
(笛, hiragana: ふえ) is the Japanese word for flute, and refers to a class of flutes native to Japan. Fue
Fue
come in many varieties, but are generally high-pitched and made of a bamboo called shinobue. [1] The most popular of the fue is the shakuhachi.Contents1 Categorization 2 History 3 Instruments 4 ReferencesCategorization[edit] Fue
Fue
are traditionally broken up into two basic categories – the transverse flute and the end-blown flute. [2] Transverse flutes are held to the side, with the musician blowing across a hole near one end; end-blown flutes are held vertically and the musician blows into one end
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Kagurabue
The kagurabue (神楽笛) is a six or seven-hole transverse flute used to support Japanese kagura performance.[1] The Kagurabue
Kagurabue
can also be known as a yamatobue.(2) References[edit]^ David Petersen (March 2007). An Invitation to Kagura: Hidden Gem of the Traditional Japanese Performing Arts. David Petersen. pp. 275–. ISBN 978-1-84753-006-6. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 2 Malm, William P (1959). Japanese music and musical instruments ([1st ed.]). p54. C.E
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Komabue
The komabue (高麗笛) ("Korean flute") is a transverse fue that is used in traditional Japanese court music. Construction[edit] The komabue is typically constructed from bamboo. It is a transverse flute with six finger-holes. It is 36 cm, shorter than the ryuteki flute.[1] Use[edit] The komabue is used in both Gagaku
Gagaku
and Komagaku. Historically the Oga family of musicians in Japan specialized in the komabue.[2] References[edit]^ Shigeo Kishibe, et al. "Japan." Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/43335pg5 ^ Marett,A. Musica Asiatica Vol
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Minteki
The mInteki (kanji: 明笛; also called shinteki (kanji: 清笛)) is a Japanese transverse flute or fue
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Nohkan
The Nohkan
Nohkan
(能管) is a high pitched, Japanese bamboo transverse flute or fue (笛). It is commonly used in traditional Imperial Noh and Kabuki
Kabuki
theatre. The nohkan flute was created by Kan'ami and his son Zeami
Zeami
in the 15th century, during the time when the two were transforming the Noh
Noh
theatre forms Dengaku
Dengaku
and Sarugaku.Contents1 Construction 2 Key and range 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksConstruction[edit] The nohkan or fue' ("flute") is made of split and tapered strips of smoked bamboo (susudake) or burned bamboo (yakidake), glued together to form a tapering conical bore. The smoking carbonizes the bamboo and preserves it. The split strips of bamboo are reversed to place the hard bamboo surface on the inside for improved acoustics
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Ryūteki
The ryūteki (龍笛, literally "dragon flute") is a Japanese transverse fue made of bamboo. It is used in gagaku, the Shinto classical music associated with Japan's imperial court. The sound of the ryūteki is said to represent the dragons which ascend the skies between the heavenly lights (represented by the shō) and the people of the earth (represented by the hichiriki). The ryūteki is one of the three flutes used in gagaku, in particular to play songs of Chinese style. The pitch is lower than that of the komabue and higher than that of the kagurabue. The ryūteki is held horizontally, has seven holes, and has a length of 40 centimeters and an inner diameter of 1.3 centimeters. Unlike the western flute, the holes are not covered by the fingertips, rather, the fleshy part of the finger is used
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Shinobue
The shinobue (kanji: 篠笛; also called takebue (kanji: 竹笛)) in the context of Japanese traditional arts) is a Japanese transverse flute or fue that has a high-pitched sound. It is found in hayashi and nagauta ensembles, and plays important roles in noh and kabuki theatre music. It is heard in Shinto
Shinto
music such as kagura-den and in traditional Japanese folk songs. There are two styles: uta (song) and hayashi (festival). The uta is properly tuned to the Western scale, and can be played in ensembles or as a solo instrument. The hayashi is not in the correct pitch, because it is simply a piece of hollow bamboo with holes cut into it. It emits a very high-pitched sound, and is appropriate for the festival/folk music of Japan
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Koudi
The koudi (Chinese: 口笛; pinyin: kǒudí; also spelled kou di) is a very small Chinese flute made from bamboo. It is the smallest flute in Chinese Flute
Flute
family. Its original shape is from prehistorical instruments made with animal bone, while Koudi
Koudi
is made with wood, bamboo or PVC, which is very distinct with the original shape. It was invented in 1971 by dizi master Yu Xunfa (俞逊发, 1946–2006).[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Basic Skills 3 Audio Sample 4 Notable players 5 See also 6 References 7 External links7.1 Photographs 7.2 Video 7.3 AudioOverview[edit] In 1971, the famous Chinese Flute
Flute
player Yu Xunfa, who was inspired by original prehistorical instrument, made the first Koudi. This instrument contains one octave, and two years later this instrument went to public by playing the recomposed Romanian folk song Ciocârlia (《云雀》)
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Daegeum
The daegeum (also spelled taegum, daegum or taegŭm) is a large bamboo transverse flute used in traditional Korean music. It has a buzzing membrane that gives it a special timbre. It is used in court, aristocratic, and folk music, as well as in contemporary classical music, popular music, and film scores. Smaller flutes in the same family include the junggeum (hangul: 중금; hanja: 中笒) and sogeum (hangul: 소금; hanja: 小笒), neither of which today have a buzzing membrane
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Sáo
The sáo (also called sáo trúc or "sow trook", pronounced [ʂǎːw ʈʂǔkp]) is a small flute found in Vietnam
Vietnam
that is traditionally thought to contain the culture and spirit of Vietnam's countryside. When played, the flutist holds the sáo transversely to the right side with his or her mouth placed at the blowing hole. The sáo is usually performed solo or in an ensemble among other instruments in orchestras of Vietnamese popular opera Chèo, Van singing genre, and Royal Small Orchestra.[1]Contents1 Construction and Materials 2 Cultural Uses and Renovations 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesConstruction and Materials[edit] Most frequently made from a single piece of bamboo, the sáo measures between 40 and 55 centimeters in length and 1.5 to 2 centimeters in diameter, with six or ten finger holes and a tuning slide.[1][2] Located inside the bamboo tube, near the oval blowing hole, is a soft wooden piece that adjust pitches when necessary
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