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Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance
The Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance
Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance
(JOFA) was founded in 1997 with the aim of "expand[ing] the spiritual, ritual, intellectual, and political opportunities for women within the framework of halakha," or Jewish law
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Miriam
Miriam
Miriam
(מִרְיָם‬) is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the daughter of Amram and Yocheved, and the sister of Moses
Moses
and Aaron. She was a prophet and first appears in the Book of Exodus. Miriam
Miriam
the prophetessContents1 Pedigree and uniqueness 2 Siblings and spouse 3 Meanings of the name 4 Other names 5 Role in Pharaoh’s Decree 6 Reverses “Amram’s Decree” 7 Role in the birth of Moses 8 Saves Moses 9 At the Song of the Sea 10 Miriam
Miriam
and Tzipora, Nu
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Synagogue
A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced /ˈsɪnəɡɒɡ/; from Greek συναγωγή, synagogē, 'assembly', Hebrew: בית כנסת‬ bet kenesset, 'house of assembly' or בית תפילה‬ bet tefila, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה esnoga or קהל kahal), is a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogues have a large place for prayer (the main sanctuary), and may also have smaller rooms for study and sometimes a social hall and offices. Some have a separate room for Torah
Torah
study, called the בית מדרש‬ beth midrash "house of study". Synagogues are consecrated spaces used for the purpose of prayer, Tanakh
Tanakh
(the entire Hebrew Bible, including the Torah) reading, study and assembly; however, a synagogue is not necessary for worship. Halakha holds that communal Jewish worship can be carried out wherever ten Jews
Jews
(a minyan) assemble
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Mikveh
Mikveh
Mikveh
or mikvah (Hebrew: מִקְוֶה / מקווה‬, Modern mikve, Tiberian miqweh, pl. mikva'ot, mikvoth, mikvot, or (Yiddish) mikves,[1][2] lit. "a collection") is a bath used for the purpose of ritual immersion in Judaism[3] to achieve ritual purity. After the destruction of the Temple, the mikveh's main uses remained as follows:by Jewish
Jewish
women to achieve ritual purity after menstruation or childbirth before they and their husbands may resume marital relations; by Jewish
Jewish
men to achieve ritual purity after ejaculation (see details below); as part of the traditional procedure for conversion to Judaism; to immerse newly acquired utensils used in serving and eating food; to immerse a body as part of the preparation for burial (taharah).Most forms of impurity can be nullified through immersion in any natural collection of water
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Halakha
Halakha (/hɑːˈlɔːxə/;[1] Hebrew: הֲלָכָה‬, Sephardic: [halaˈχa]; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) (Ashkenazic: [haˈloχo]) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah. It is based on biblical laws or "commandments" (mitzvot) (traditionally numbered as 613), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic law and the customs and traditions compiled in the many books, one of the most famous of which is the 16th-century Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(literally "Prepared Table"). Halakha is often translated as " Jewish
Jewish
Law", although a more literal translation might be "the way to behave" or "the way of walking". The word derives from the root that means "to behave" (also "to go" or "to walk")
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Negiah
Negiah (Hebrew: נגיעה‬),[1] literally "touch," is the concept in Jewish
Jewish
law (Halakha) that forbids or restricts physical contact with a member of the opposite sex (except for one's spouse,[2] children, siblings,[3] grandchildren,[4] parents, and grandparents).[5] A person who abides by this halakha is colloquially described as a shomer negiah ("one observant of negiah").[6] The laws of negiah are typically followed by Orthodox Jews, with varying levels of observance. Some Orthodox Jews follow the laws with strict modesty and take measures to avoid accidental contact, such as avoiding sitting next to a member of the opposite sex on a bus, airplane, or other similar seating situation. Others are more lenient, only avoiding purposeful contact
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Judaism And Sexuality
The Jewish
Jewish
tradition devotes considerable attention to sexuality. Sexuality is the subject of many narratives and laws in the Tanakh
Tanakh
and rabbinic literature.Contents1 Attitude
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Tzniut
Tzniut
Tzniut
(Hebrew: צניעות‬, tzniut, Sephardi
Sephardi
pronunciation, tzeniut(h); Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation, tznius, "modesty", or "privacy") describes both the character trait of modesty and humility, as well as a group of Jewish laws pertaining to conduct in general, and especially between the sexes. The term is frequently used with regard to the rules of dress for women within Judaism
Judaism
and has its greatest influence as a concept within Orthodox Judaism.Contents1 Hebrew Bible and Talmud 2 Description 3 Practical applications3.1 Dress 3.2 Hair covering 3.3 Female singing voice3.3.1 Orthodox Judaism 3.3.2 Other denominations3.4 Touch 3.5 Yichud 3.6 Synagogue
Synagogue
services4 Observances 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 ReferencesHebrew Bible and Talmud[edit] Humility
Humility
is a paramount ideal within Judaism
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Yichud
In Jewish
Jewish
religious law (halakha), the laws of yichud (Hebrew: איסור ייחוד‬ issur yichud, prohibition of seclusion) is the prohibition of seclusion in a private area of a man and a woman who are not married to each other. Such seclusion is prohibited in order to prevent the two from being tempted or having the opportunity to commit adulterous or promiscuous acts. A person who is present in order to prevent yichud is called a shomer. The laws of yichud are typically followed in Orthodox Judaism. Adherents of Conservative and Reform Judaism
Judaism
do not generally abide by the laws of yichud. The term "yichud" also refers to a ritual during an Ashkenazi Jewish wedding in which the newly married couple spends a period secluded in a room by themselves
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Jewish Views On Marriage
In traditional Judaism, marriage is viewed as a contractual bond commanded by God in which a man and a woman come together to create a relationship in which God is directly involved. (Deut. 24:1) Though procreation is not the sole purpose, a Jewish marriage is traditionally expected to fulfil the commandment to have children. (Gen
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish 20.8% Arab 4.5% other[5]Religion (2016
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Halachah
Halakha (/hɑːˈlɔːxə/;[1] Hebrew: הֲלָכָה‬, Sephardic: [halaˈχa]; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) (Ashkenazic: [haˈloχo]) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah. It is based on biblical laws or "commandments" (mitzvot) (traditionally numbered as 613), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic law and the customs and traditions compiled in the many books, one of the most famous of which is the 16th-century Shulchan Aruch (literally "Prepared Table"). Halakha is often translated as "Jewish Law", although a more literal translation might be "the way to behave" or "the way of walking". The word derives from the root that means "to behave" (also "to go" or "to walk")
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Book Of Esther
The Book
Book
of Esther, also known in Hebrew
Hebrew
as "the Scroll" (Megillah), is a book in the third section (Ketuvim, "Writings") of the Jewish Tanakh
Tanakh
(the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible) and in the Christian Old Testament. It is one of the five Scrolls (Megillot) in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible. It relates the story of a Hebrew
Hebrew
woman in Persia, born as Hadassah
Hadassah
but known as Esther, who becomes queen of Persia and thwarts a genocide of her people. The story forms the core of the Jewish festival
Jewish festival
of Purim, during which it is read aloud twice: once in the evening and again the following morning
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Sukkah
A sukkah or succah (/ˈsʊkə/; Sephardic
Sephardic
Hebrew Hebrew: סוכה‎, plural, סוכות sukkot ; sukkoth, often translated as "booth") is a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish festival of Sukkot. It is topped with branches and often well decorated with autumnal, harvest or Judaic themes. The Book of Vayikra (Leviticus) describes it as a symbolic wilderness shelter, commemorating the time God provided for the Israelites in the wilderness they inhabited after they were freed from slavery in Egypt.[1] It is common for Jews to eat, sleep and otherwise spend time in the sukkah
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