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Jewellery
Jewellery
Jewellery
(British English) or jewelry (American English)[1] consists of small decorative items worn for personal adornment, such as brooches, rings, necklaces, earrings, pendants, bracelets, and cufflinks. Jewellery
Jewellery
may be attached to the body or the clothes, and the term is restricted to durable ornaments, excluding flowers for example. For many centuries metal, often combined with gemstones, has been the normal material for jewellery, but other materials such as shells and other plant materials may be used
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Jewelry (band)
Jewelry (Korean: 쥬얼리) was a South Korean girl group formed in 2001 by Star Empire Entertainment
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Social Status
Social status
Social status
is the relative respect, competence, and deference accorded to people, groups, and organizations in a society.[1][2] At its core, status is about who is thought to be comparatively better.[3] These beliefs about who is better or worse are broadly shared among members of a society.[4] As such, status hierarchies decide who gets to "call the shots," who is worthy, and who deserves access to valuable resources. In so doing, shared cultural beliefs uphold systems of social stratification by making inequality in society appear natural and fair.[5] Status hierarchies appear to be universal across human societies, affording valued benefits to those who occupy the higher rungs, such as better health, social approval, resources, influence, and freedom.[2] Status hierarchies depend primarily on the possession and use of status symbols
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Indian English
Indian English
Indian English
is any of the forms of English characteristic of India.[1] English is the only official language in some states of India
India
and is a lingua franca in the country.[2]Contents1 English proficienc
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New Zealand English
New Zealand
New Zealand
English (NZE) is the variant[2] of the English language spoken by most English-speaking New Zealanders. Its language code in ISO and Internet standards is en-NZ.[3] English is one of New Zealand's three official languages (along with New Zealand
New Zealand
Sign Language and the Māori language)[4] and is the first language of the majority of the population. The English language
English language
was established in New Zealand
New Zealand
by colonists during the 19th century
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Hiberno-English
Hiberno‐English (from Latin Hibernia: "Ireland") or Irish English[2] is the set of English dialects natively written and spoken within the island of Ireland
Ireland
(including both the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
and Northern Ireland).[3] English was brought to Ireland
Ireland
as a result of the Norman invasion of Ireland
Ireland
of the late 12th century. Initially, it was mainly spoken in an area known as the Pale around Dublin, with mostly Irish spoken throughout the rest of the country
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Australian English
Australian English
Australian English
(AuE, en-AU)[3] is a major variety of the English language, used throughout Australia. Although English has no official status in the Constitution, Australian English
Australian English
is the country's national and de facto official language as it is the first language of the majority of the population. Australian English
Australian English
began to diverge from British English
British English
after the founding of the Colony of New South Wales
Colony of New South Wales
in 1788 and was recognised as being different from British English
British English
by 1820
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South African English
South African English
South African English
(SAfrE, SAfrEng, SAE, en-ZA[1]) is the set of English dialects spoken by native South Africans.Contents1 History 2 Varieties 3 Phonetics 4 Lexicon4.1 History of SAE Dictionaries 4.2 Expressions5 Demographics 6 Examples of South African accents 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] British colonizers first introduced English to the South African region in 1795, when they established a military holding operation at the Cape
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Canadian English
Canadian English
Canadian English
(CanE, CE, en-CA[3]) is the set of varieties of the English language
English language
native to Canada
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Objets D'art
Objet d'art
Objet d'art
(plural objets d'art) means literally "art object", or work of art, in French, but in practice the term has long been reserved in English to describe works of art that are not paintings, large or medium-sized sculptures, prints or drawings. It therefore covers a wide range of works, usually small and three-dimensional, of high quality and finish in areas of the decorative arts, such as metalwork items, with or without enamel, small carvings, statuettes and plaquettes in any material, including engraved gems, hardstone carvings, ivory carvings and similar items, non-utilitarian porcelain and glass, and a vast range of objects that would also be classed as antiques (or indeed antiquities), such as small clocks, watches, gold boxes, and sometimes textiles, especially tapestries
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Kenya
Coordinates: 1°N 38°E / 1°N 38°E / 1; 38 Republic
Republic
of Kenya Jamhuri ya Kenya
Kenya
(Kiswahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Harambee" (Kiswahili) "Let us all pull together"Anthem: Ee Mungu Nguvu Yetu O God of all creationLocation
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Wedding Ring
A wedding ring or wedding band is a finger ring that indicates that its wearer is married.[1] It is usually forged from metal, and traditionally is forged of gold or another precious metal.[2] The earliest examples of wedding rings are from Ancient Egypt. Western customs for wedding rings can be traced to ancient Rome and Greece, and were transmitted to the present through Christendom
Christendom
in Europe, which adapted the ancient customs. Depending on culture, a wedding ring is typically worn on the base of the left or right ring finger. Many spouses wear their wedding rings day and night, causing an indentation in the skin that is visible even when the ring is removed
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Amulet
An amulet is an object that is typically worn on one's person and is alleged to have the magical power to protect its holder, either to protect them in general or to protect them from some specific thing; it is also used for decoration. [1] Amulets are different from talismans because a talisman may have alleged magical powers other than protection.[2] Amulets are sometimes confused with pendants, small aesthetic objects that hang from necklaces. Any given pendant may indeed be an amulet but so may any other object that purports to protect its holder from danger. Potential amulets include gems, especially engraved gems, statues, coins, drawings, pendants, rings, plant parts, animal parts, and even written words in the form of a magical spell or incantation to repel evil or bad luck
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Dowry
A dowry is a transfer of parental property, gifts or money at the marriage of a daughter.[1] Dowry
Dowry
contrasts with the related concepts of bride price and dower. While bride price or bride service is a payment by the groom or his family to the bride's parents, dowry is the wealth transferred from the bride's family to the groom or his family, ostensibly for the bride. Similarly, dower is the property settled on the bride herself, by the groom at the time of marriage, and which remains under her ownership and control.[2] Dowry
Dowry
is an ancient custom, and its existence may well predate records of it. Dowries continue to be expected, and demanded as a condition to accept a marriage proposal, in some parts of the world, mainly in parts of Asia, Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and the Balkans
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