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JetBeetle Mantis H250
The JetBeetle Tarantula H90
JetBeetle Tarantula H90
is an American gas-turbine engine for use on Homebuilt aircraft It is capable of producing 90 lbf (0.40 kN) thrust at 88,000rpm.[1][2]Contents1 Variants 2 Applications 3 Specifications (Tarantula H90)3.1 General characteristics 3.2 Components 3.3 Performance4 NotesVariants[edit]Tarantula H90 90 lbf (0.40 kN) Tarantula H100 (Updated H90 released summer 2016) 105 lbf (0.47 kN)JetBeetle Locust H150RLocust H150R 170 lbf (0.76 kN)JetBeetle Mantis H250Mantis H250 250
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Monnett Monerai
The Monnett Monerai
Monnett Monerai
is a sailplane that was developed in the United States in the late 1970s for homebuilding. It is a conventional pod-and-boom design with a V-tail
V-tail
and a mid-mounted cantilever wing of constant chord. The kit assembles in approximately 600 hours. It has bonded wing skins and incorporates 90° flaps for glide path control. The pod-and-boom fuselage consists of a welded steel tube truss encased in a fiberglass shell, with an aluminum tube for the tailboom. A spar fitting modification was released in 1983.[1] A powered version was designed as the Monerai P with an engine mounted on a pylon above the wings
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Homebuilt Aircraft
Homebuilt aircraft, also known as amateur-built aircraft or kit planes, are constructed by persons for whom this is not a professional activity. These aircraft may be constructed from "scratch," from plans, or from assembly kits.[1][2]Contents1 Overview 2 History2.1 Early years 2.2 Technology and innovation 2.3 Future trends3 Building materials3.1 Wood and fabric 3.2 Wood/composite mixture 3.3 Metal 3.4 Composite4 Safety 5 Culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] In the United States, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and South Africa, homebuilt aircraft may be licensed Experimental under FAA or similar local regulations. With some limitations, the builder(s) of the aircraft must have done it for their own education and recreation[3] rather than for profit
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Turbojet
The turbojet is an airbreathing jet engine, typically used in aircraft. It consists of a gas turbine with a propelling nozzle. The gas turbine has an air inlet, a compressor, a combustion chamber, and a turbine (that drives the compressor). The compressed air from the compressor is heated by the fuel in the combustion chamber and then allowed to expand through the turbine. The turbine exhaust is then expanded in the propelling nozzle where it is accelerated to high speed to provide thrust.[1] Two engineers, Frank Whittle
Frank Whittle
in the United Kingdom and Hans von Ohain
Hans von Ohain
in Germany, developed the concept independently into practical engines during the late 1930s. Turbojets have been replaced in slower aircraft by turboprops because they have better range-specific fuel consumption. At medium speeds, where the propeller is no longer efficient, turboprops have been replaced by turbofans
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Combustor
A combustor is a component or area of a gas turbine, ramjet, or scramjet engine where combustion takes place. It is also known as a burner, combustion chamber or flame holder. In a gas turbine engine, the combustor or combustion chamber is fed high pressure air by the compression system. The combustor then heats this air at constant pressure. After heating, air passes from the combustor through the nozzle guide vanes to the turbine. In the case of a ramjet or scramjet engines, the air is directly fed to the nozzle. A combustor must contain and maintain stable combustion despite very high air flow rates. To do so combustors are carefully designed to first mix and ignite the air and fuel, and then mix in more air to complete the combustion process. Early gas turbine engines used a single chamber known as a can type combustor. Today three main configurations exist: can, annular and cannular (also referred to as can-annular tubo-annular)
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Turbine
A turbine (from the Latin
Latin
turbo, a vortex, related to the Greek τύρβη, tyrbē, meaning "turbulence")[1][2] is a rotary mechanical device that extracts energy from a fluid flow and converts it into useful work. The work produced by a turbine can be used for generating electrical power when combined with a generator or producing thrust, as in the case of jet engines.[3] A turbine is a turbomachine with at least one moving part called a rotor assembly, which is a shaft or drum with blades attached. Moving fluid acts on the blades so that they move and impart rotational energy to the rotor. Early turbine examples are windmills and waterwheels. Gas, steam, and water turbines have a casing around the blades that contains and controls the working fluid
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Kerosene
Kerosene, also known as paraffin, lamp oil, and coal oil (an obsolete term), is a combustible hydrocarbon liquid which is derived from petroleum, widely used as a fuel in industry as well as households. Its name derives from Greek: κηρός (keros) meaning wax, and was registered as a trademark by Canadian geologist and inventor Abraham Gesner in 1854 before evolving into a genericized trademark. It is sometimes spelled kerosine in scientific and industrial usage.[1] The term kerosene is common in much of Argentina, Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, and the United States,[2][3] while the term paraffin (or a closely related variant) is used in Chile, eastern Africa, South Africa, and in the United Kingdom,[4] and (a variant of) the term petroleum in Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Latvian, Serbian, Slovak and Slovenian
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Thrust
Thrust
Thrust
is a reaction force described quantitatively by Isaac Newton's second and third laws. When a system expels or accelerates mass in one direction, the accelerated mass will cause a force of equal magnitude but opposite direction on that system.[1] The force applied on a surface in a direction perpendicular or normal to the surface is called thrust
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Thrust-to-weight Ratio
Thrust-to-weight ratio
Thrust-to-weight ratio
is a dimensionless ratio of thrust to weight of a rocket, jet engine, propeller engine, or a vehicle propelled by such an engine that indicates the performance of the engine or vehicle. The instantaneous thrust-to-weight ratio of a vehicle varies continually during operation due to progressive consumption of fuel or propellant and in some cases a gravity gradient. The thrust-to-weight ratio based on initial thrust and weight is often published and used as a figure of merit for quantitative comparison of the initial performance of vehicles.Contents1 Calculation 2 Aircraft2.1 Propeller-driven aircraft3 Rockets 4 Examples4.1 Aircraft 4.2 Jet and rocket engines 4.3 Fighter aircraft5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes7 External linksCalculation[edit] The thrust-to-weight ratio can be calculated by dividing the thrust (in SI units – in newtons) by the weight (in newtons) of the engine or vehicle
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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JetBeetle Tarantula H90
The JetBeetle Tarantula H90 is an American gas-turbine engine for use on Homebuilt aircraft It is capable of producing 90 lbf (0.40 kN) thrust at 88,000rpm.[1][2]Contents1 Variants 2 Applications 3 Specifications (Tarantula H90)3.1 General characteristics 3.2 Components 3.3 Performance4 NotesVariants[edit]Tarantula H90 90 lbf (0.40 kN) Tarantula H100 (Updated H90 released summer 2016) 105 lbf (0.47 kN)JetBeetle Locust H150RLocust H150R 170 lbf (0.76 kN)JetBeetle Mantis H250Mantis H250 250 lbf (1.11 kN)Applications[edit]Monnett MoneraiSpecifications (Tarantula H90)[edit] Data from JetBeetle[3] General characteristicsType: Turbojet Length: 475 mm (18.7 in) with starter Diameter: 165 mm (6.5 in) Dry weight: 16.5 lb (7.5 kg) with starterComponentsCompressor: single stage centrifugal Combustors: Annula
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