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Jesus Christ Superstar
Jesus
Jesus
Christ Superstar is a 1970 rock opera with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice. The musical started as a rock opera concept album before its Broadway debut in 1971. The musical is mostly sung-through, with little spoken dialogue. The story is loosely based on the Gospels' accounts of the last week of Jesus's life, beginning with the preparation for the arrival of Jesus
Jesus
and his disciples in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and ending with the crucifixion. It depicts political and interpersonal struggles between Judas Iscariot
Judas Iscariot
and Jesus
Jesus
that are not present in the Bible. The work's depiction offers a free interpretation of the psychology of Jesus
Jesus
and the other characters
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False Messiah
This is a list of people who have been said to be a messiah, either by themselves or by their followers. The list is divided into categories, which are sorted according to date of birth (where known).Contents1 Jewish messiah claimants 2 Christian
Christian
messiah claimants 3 Muslim
Muslim
messiah claimants 4 Other or combination messiah claimants 5 See also 6 References 7 Other sourcesJewish messiah claimants[edit] Main article: Jewish messianic claimants In Judaism, "messiah" originally meant a divinely appointed king, such as David, Cyrus the Great[1] or Alexander the Great.[2] Later, especially after the failure of the Hasmonean Kingdom
Hasmonean Kingdom
(37 BC) and the Jewish–Roman wars
Jewish–Roman wars
(AD 66–135), the figure of the Jewish messiah was one who would deliver the Jews from oppression and usher in an Olam Haba ("world to come") or Messianic Age
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Gethsemane
Coordinates: 31°46′46″N 35°14′25″E / 31.779402°N 35.240197°E / 31.779402; 35.240197Garden of Gethsemane Gethsemane
Gethsemane
(Greek: Γεθσημανή, Gethsemane; Hebrew: גת שמנים‎, Gat Shmanim; Classical Syriac: ܓܕܣܡܢ‎, Gaḏ Šmānê, lit. "oil press") is an urban garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives
Mount of Olives
in Jerusalem, most famous as the place where Jesus prayed and his disciples slept the night before his crucifixion; i.e. the site recorded as where the agony in the garden took place.Contents1 Etymology 2 Location 3 Pilgrimage site 4 Olive trees 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Gethsemane
Gethsemane
appears in the Greek original of the Gospel of Matthew[1] and the Gospel of Mark[2] as Γεθσημανή (Gethsēmanē)
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John The Baptist
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Hebrew: יוחנן המטביל‎, Ancient Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής, Iōánnēs ho baptistḗs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων, Iōánnēs ho baptízōn,[5][6][7][8][9], Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ ⲡⲓⲡⲣⲟⲇⲣⲟⲙⲟⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ ⲡⲓⲣϥϯⲱⲙⲥ[10], Arabic: يحيى‎, translit. Yaḥyā[11]) was a Jewish
Jewish
itinerant preacher[12] in the early first century AD. John is revered as a major religious figure[13] in Christianity, Islam, the Bahá'í Faith,[14] and Mandaeism. He is called a prophet by all of these traditions, and is honored as a saint in many Christian
Christian
traditions. Other titles for John include John the Forerunner in Eastern Christianity
Christianity
and "the prophet John" (Yaḥyā) in Islam
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Triumphal Entry Into Jerusalem
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eIn the accounts of the four canonical Gospels, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem
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Galilean
Generically, a Galilean is an inhabitant of Galilee. The New Testament notes that the Apostle Peter's accent gave him away as a Galilean (Matthew 26:73 and Mark 14:70). The Galilean dialect referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
was a form of Jewish Palestinian Aramaic spoken by people in Galilee
Galilee
from the late Second Temple period
Second Temple period
(530 BCE) through the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
(c. 100 CE)
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Second Temple Of Jerusalem
The Second Temple
Second Temple
(Hebrew: בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי‎, Beit HaMikdash HaSheni) was the Jewish
Jewish
Holy Temple which stood on the Temple Mount
Temple Mount
in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
during the Second Temple period, between 516 BCE and 70 CE. According to Jewish tradition, it replaced Solomon's Temple
Solomon's Temple
(the First Temple), which was destroyed by the Babylonians
Babylonians
in 586 BCE, when Jerusalem
Jerusalem
was conquered and part of the population of the Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
was taken into exile to Babylon. The Second Temple
Second Temple
was originally a rather modest structure constructed by a number of Jewish
Jewish
exile groups returning to the Levant from Babylon
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Usury
Usury
Usury
(/ˈjuːʒəri/[1][2]) is, as defined today, the practice of making unethical or immoral monetary loans that unfairly enrich the lender. Originally, usury meant interest of any kind. A loan may be considered usurious because of excessive or abusive interest rates or other factors. Historically, in some Christian
Christian
societies, and in many Islamic societies even today, charging any interest at all would be considered usury. Someone who practices usury can be called a usurer, but a more common term in contemporary English is loan shark. The term may be used in a moral sense—condemning, taking advantage of others' misfortunes—or in a legal sense where interest rates may be regulated by law
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Jesus And The Money Changers
Portals: Christianity Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eThe cleansing of the Temple narrative tells of Jesus
Jesus
expelling the merchants and the money changers from the Temple, and occurs in all four canonical gospels of the New Testament. In this account, Jesus
Jesus
and his disciples travel to Jerusalem for Passover, where Jesus
Jesus
expels the merchants and money changers from the Temple, accusing them of turning the Temple into "a den of thieves" through their commercial activities.[1][2] In the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
Jesus refers to the Temple as "my Father's house", thus, making a claim to being the Son of God.[3] The narrative occurs near the end of the Synoptic Gospels
Synoptic Gospels
(at Matthew 21:12–17, Mark 11:15–19, and Luke 19:45–48) and near the start in the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
(at John 2:13–16)
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Thirty Pieces Of Silver
Thirty pieces of silver
Thirty pieces of silver
was the price for which Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus, according to an account in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
26:15 in the New Testament.[1] Before the Last Supper, Judas is said to have gone to the chief priests and agreed to hand over Jesus
Jesus
in exchange for 30 silver coins, and to have attempted to return the money afterwards, filled with remorse. The Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
claims that the subsequent purchase of the Potter's field
Potter's field
was fulfilment, by Jesus, of a prophecy of Zechariah.[2][3] The image has often been used in artwork depicting the Passion of Christ
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Last Supper
The Last Supper
Last Supper
is the final meal that, in the Gospel
Gospel
accounts, Jesus shared with his Apostles
Apostles
in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
before his crucifixion.[2] The Last Supper
Last Supper
is commemorated by Christians especially on Maundy Thursday.[3] The Last Supper
Last Supper
provides the scriptural basis for the Eucharist, also known as "Holy Communion" or "The Lord's Supper".[4] The First Epistle to the Corinthians
First Epistle to the Corinthians
contains the earliest known mention of the Last Supper
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Anointing Of Jesus
Portals: Christianity Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eThe anointing of Jesus’s feet are events recorded in the four gospels. The account in Matthew 26, Mark 14, and John 12
John 12
has as its location the city of Bethany in the south and involves Mary the sister of Martha and Lazarus. The event in Luke features an unknown sinful woman, and is in the northern region, as Luke 7
Luke 7
indicates Jesus was ministering in the northern regions of Nain and Capernaum
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Denial Of Peter
The Denial of Peter
Denial of Peter
(or Peter's Denial) refers to three acts of denial of Jesus
Jesus
by the Apostle Peter
Apostle Peter
as described in all four Gospels of the New Testament.[1] All four Canonical Gospels
Canonical Gospels
state that during Jesus' Last Supper
Last Supper
with his disciples, he predicted that Peter would deny knowledge of him, stating that Peter would disown him before the rooster crowed the next morning. Following the arrest of Jesus, Peter denied knowing him three times, but after the third denial, heard the rooster crow and recalled the prediction as Jesus
Jesus
turned to look at him. Peter then began to cry bitterly.[2] This final incident is known as the Repentance of Peter.[3] The turbulent emotions behind Peter's denial and later repentance have been the subject of major works of art for centuries
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Kiss Of Judas
The kiss of Judas, also known (especially in art) as the Betrayal of Christ, is how Judas identified Jesus
Jesus
to the multitude with swords and clubs who had come from the chief priests and elders of the people to arrest him, according to the Synoptic Gospels
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