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Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal
The Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal is awarded every two years by the US National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
"for important contributions to the medical sciences." It was first awarded in 1952 and involves a prize of $25,000 plus $50,000 for research.[1] The Kovalenko Fund was donated by Michael S. Kovalenko in 1949 to the National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
in memory of his wife, Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko. Recipients[1][edit]Recipient Year Achievement/RationaleHuda Y. Zoghbi 2016 For her pioneering contributions to the fields of neurodegenerative proteinopathies, autism spectrum disorders, epigenetics, and developmental biology by coupling clinical observation and gene discovery with focused, in-depth mechanistic study.Stuart H
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Peyton Rous
Francis Peyton Rous
Francis Peyton Rous
ForMemRS[1] (/raʊs/) (October 5, 1879 – February 16, 1970) was an American Nobel Prize-winning virologist.Contents1 Education and early life 2 Career and research 3 Awards and honors 4 Personal life 5 References 6 Further readingEducation and early life[edit] Rous was born in Woodlawn, Maryland in 1879 and received his B.A. and M.D. from Johns Hopkins University.[2] Career and research[edit] Rous was involved in the discovery of the role of viruses in the transmission of certain types of cancer
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Seymour S. Kety
Seymour S. Kety (August 25, 1915 – May 25, 2000) was an American neuroscientist who was credited with making modern psychiatry a rigorous and heuristic branch of medicine by applying basic science to the study of human behavior in health and disease.[1] After Kety died, his colleague Louis Sokoloff noted that: "He discovered a method for measuring blood flow in the brain, was the first scientific director of the National Institute of Mental Health
National Institute of Mental Health
(NIMH) and produced the most-definitive evidence for the essential involvement of genetic factors in schizophrenia." [2]Contents1 Childhood 2 Schooling 3 Kety's first contribution to science 4 Kety's slow transition to psychology 5 Kety's results 6 Seymour Kety's legacy 7 References 8 External linksChildhood[edit] Semyour S. Kety was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
in 1915
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Prizes Named After People
This is a list of prizes that are named after people. For other lists of eponyms (names derived from people) see Lists of etymologies.Contents: Top A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZA[edit]Award Named after Field Achievement Source Abdus Salam
Abdus Salam
! Abdus Salam
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Alfred N. Richards
Prof Alfred Newton Richards (March 22, 1876 – March 24, 1966) was an American pharmacologist.[1][2]Contents1 Career 2 Family 3 Recognition 4 Awards and honors 5 ReferencesCareer[edit] Richards was born in Stamford, New York the son of Rev Leonard E. Richards and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Burbank. He was educated at the Stamford Seminary and Union Free School. He then studied at Yale University.[3] He served as chairman of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine's department of pharmacology from 1910 to 1946 and was the university's vice-president of medical affairs from 1939 to 1948. In 1941 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed Richards chairman of the Committee on Medical Research
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Ernest W. Goodpasture
Dr. Ernest William Goodpasture (October 17, 1886 – September 20, 1960) was an American pathologist and physician. Goodpasture advanced the scientific understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases, parasitism, and a variety of rickettsial and viral infections. Together with colleagues at Vanderbilt University, he invented methods for growing viruses and rickettsiae in chicken embryos and fertilized chicken eggs. This enabled the development of vaccines against influenza, chicken pox, smallpox, yellow fever, typhus, Rocky mountain spotted fever, and other diseases.[1] He also described Goodpasture syndrome.[2] Contents1 Education and professional career 2 Awards 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksEducation and professional career[edit] Goodpasture was born in Clarksville, Tennessee, in 1886. He received his B.A. from Vanderbilt University in 1908. In 1912, Goodpasture graduated from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with an M.D
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Karl F. Meyer
Karl Friedrich Meyer
Karl Friedrich Meyer
(19 May 1884 – 27 April 1974) was an American scientist of Swiss origin. He was one of the most prodigious scientists in many areas of infectious diseases in man and animals, the ecology of pathogens, epidemiology and public health[1-6]
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George H. Whipple
George Hoyt Whipple (August 28, 1878 – February 1, 1976)[1] was an American physician, pathologist, biomedical researcher, and medical school educator and administrator
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Rufus Cole
Rufus Cole (April 30, 1872 – April 20, 1966) was an American medical doctor and the first director of the Rockefeller University Hospital.[1] Under his leadership significant advances in treatment of bacterial pneumonia and later against tuberculosis were made. In 1912 Cole and Alphonse Dochez developed a serum against Type 1 pneumococcus and also developed a method for testing whether an infection is caused by this or some other type of the bacterium.[2] The New York Times
The New York Times
in its obituary for Cole called him "a pioneer in clinical medicine" and "an authority on lobar pneumonia"
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Anticoagulant
Anticoagulants, commonly referred to as blood thinners, are chemical substances that prevent or reduce coagulation of blood, prolonging the clotting time. Some of them occur naturally in blood-eating animals such as leeches and mosquitoes, where they help keep the bite area unclotted long enough for the animal to obtain some blood. As a class of medications, anticoagulants are used in therapy for thrombotic disorders. Oral anticoagulants (OACs) are taken by many people in pill or tablet form, and various intravenous anticoagulant dosage forms are used in hospitals. Some anticoagulants are used in medical equipment, such as test tubes, blood transfusion bags, and dialysis equipment. Anticoagulants are closely related to antiplatelet drugs and thrombolytic drugs by manipulating the various pathways of blood coagulation
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Coumarin
Coumarin
Coumarin
(/ˈkuːmərɪn/; 2H-chromen-2-one) is a fragrant organic chemical compound in the benzopyrone chemical class, although it may also be seen as a subclass of lactones.[1] It is a natural substance found in many plants, and a colorless crystalline substance in its standard state. The name comes from a French term for the tonka bean, coumarou, one of the sources from which coumarin was first isolated as a natural product in 1820. It has a sweet odor, readily recognised as the scent of newly-mown hay, and has been used in perfumes since 1882. Sweet woodruff, meadowsweet, sweet grass and sweet-clover in particular are named for their sweet (i.e., pleasant) smell, which in turn is related to their high coumarin content
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Atomic Bomb
A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb). Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter. The first test of a fission ("atomic") bomb released an amount of energy approximately equal to 20,000 tons of TNT (84 TJ). The first thermonuclear ("hydrogen") bomb test released energy approximately equal to 10 million tons of TNT (42 PJ).[1] A thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than 2,400 pounds (1,100 kg) can release energy equal to more than 1.2 million tons of TNT (5.0 PJ).[2] A nuclear device no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire, and radiation
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Thomas Francis, Jr.
Thomas Francis Jr.
Thomas Francis Jr.
(July 15, 1900 – October 1, 1969) was an American physician, virologist, and epidemiologist. Francis was the first person to isolate influenza virus in the United States, and in 1940 showed that there are other strains of influenza, and took part in the development of influenza vaccines. Contents1 Life 2 Honors 3 Further reading 4 Publications 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Francis grew up in New Castle in western Pennsylvania, graduated from New Castle High School in 1917 and Allegheny College
Allegheny College
on scholarship in 1921, and received his medical degree from Yale University
Yale University
in 1925. Afterwards he joined an elite research team at the Rockefeller Institute, first doing research on vaccines against bacterial pneumonia, later he took up influenza research
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Karl Paul Link
Karl Paul Gerhard Link (31 January 1901 – 21 November 1978) was an American biochemist best known for his discovery of the anticoagulant warfarin.Contents1 Training and early career 2 Anticoagulants 3 Later years 4 Bibliography 5 Sources 6 External linksTraining and early career[edit] He was born in LaPorte, Indiana
LaPorte, Indiana
to a Lutheran minister of German descent as one of ten children. He was schooled locally, and attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he studied agricultural chemistry at the College of Agriculture from 1918 to 1925, obtaining an MS in 1923 and a PhD in 1925. He was then chosen by the national Education Board for a postdoctoral scholarship, and relocated to Europe. He briefly worked with carbohydrate chemist Sir James Irvine at the University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
in Scotland and from 1926 with Fritz Pregl, inventor of microchemistry and Nobel Laureate
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Janet D. Rowley
Janet Davison Rowley (April 5, 1925 – December 17, 2013) was an American human geneticist and the first scientist to identify a chromosomal translocation as the cause of leukemia and other cancers.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][excessive citations] Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Awards and honors 4 Death 5 References 6 Further readingEarly life and education[edit] Janet Davison was born in New York City
New York City
in 1925, the only child of Hurford and Ethel Ballantyne Davison. Her father held a master of business administration degree from Harvard Business School, and her mother a master's degree in education from Columbia University. Her parents were educators at the college and high school levels, respectively, and her mother later gave up teaching to become a school librarian. Davison attended an academically challenging junior high school in New Jersey and became especially interested in science
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Maclyn McCarty
Robert Koch Prize (Gold, 1981) Wolf Prize for Medicine (1990) Maclyn McCarty
Maclyn McCarty
(June 9, 1911 – January 2, 2005) was an American geneticist. Maclyn McCarty, who devoted his life as a physician-scientist to studying infectious disease organisms, was best known for his part in the monumental discovery that DNA, rather than protein, constituted the chemical nature of a gene. Uncovering the molecular secret of the gene in question — that for the capsular polysaccharide of pneumococcal bacteria — led the way to studying heredity not only through genetics but also through chemistry, and initiated the dawn of the age of molecular biology. McCarty was the youngest and longest surviving member of the research team responsible for this feat (known as the Avery–MacLeod–McCarty experiment), which also included Oswald T. Avery
Oswald T

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