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Jesse Harper
Jesse Clair Harper (December 10, 1883 – July 31, 1961) was an American football
American football
and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Alma College (1906–1907), Wabash College
Wabash College
(1909–1912), and the University of Notre Dame (1913–1917), compiling a career college football record of 57–17–7. Harper was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1971.Contents1 Coaching career1.1 Alma 1.2 Wabash 1.3 Notre Dame2 Later life 3 Head coaching record3.1 Football4 References 5 External linksCoaching career[edit] Alma[edit] Harper was the head football coach at Alma College
Alma College
in Alma, Michigan. He held that position for the 1906 and 1907 seasons
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
The Michigan
Michigan
Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) is an athletic conference that competes in the NCAA's Division III. The nine teams in the conference are all located in the states of Michigan
Michigan
and Indiana. The Michigan
Michigan
Intercollegiate Athletic Association was established on March 24, 1888, making it the oldest college athletic conference in the United States.[1] The current members of the MIAA include Adrian College, Albion College, Alma College, Calvin College, Hope College, Kalamazoo College, Olivet College, Saint Mary's College of Notre Dame, Indiana, and Trine University, formerly known as Tri-State University. Olivet and Albion are the only charter members remaining in the conference
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Crawfordsville, Indiana
Crawfordsville is a city in Union Township, Montgomery County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Indiana.[7] As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 15,915. The city is the county seat of Montgomery County.[8] It is home to Wabash College, which was ranked by Forbes
Forbes
as #12 in the United States for undergraduate studies in 2008.[9]Contents1 History1.1 National Register of Historic Places 1.2 Early 19th century 1.3 Late 19th century 1.4 20th century 1.5 21st century2 Mayors 3 Geography 4 Demographics4.1 2010 census 4.2 2000 census5 Industry 6 Education 7 Media 8 Transportation8.1 Rail 8.2 Airport9 Notable people 10 Footnotes 11 External linksHistory[edit] National Register of Historic Places[edit] As of 2016, Crawfordsville has twelve properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Three of the properties are currently museums: Gen. Lew Wallace
Lew Wallace
Study,
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College Football Data Warehouse
College Football Data Warehouse is an American college football statistics website that was established in 2000 and went on hiatus in March 2017. The site compiled the yearly team records, game-by-game results, championships, and statistics of college football teams, conferences, and head coaches at the NCAA
NCAA
Division I FBS and Division I FCS levels, as well as those of some NCAA
NCAA
Division II, NCAA
NCAA
Division III, NAIA, NJCAA, and discontinued programs
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1913 Army Cadets Football Team
The 1913 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1913 college football season. In their first season under head coach Charles Dudley Daly, the Cadets compiled an 8–1 record, shut out five of their nine opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 253 to 57 – an average of 28.1 points scored and 6.3 points allowed.[1] The Cadets' only loss was against Notre Dame team by a 35 to 13 score. In the annual Army–Navy Game at the Polo Grounds in New York City, the Cadets won 22–9.[2] End Louis A
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Kansas
Kansas
Kansas
/ˈkænzəs/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern United States.[10] Its capital is Topeka
Topeka
and its largest city is Wichita. Kansas
Kansas
is named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area.[11] The tribe's name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean "people of the (south) wind" although this was probably not the term's original meaning.[12][13] For thousands of years, what is now Kansas
Kansas
was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys
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Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
is a limited-contact sport played on a rectangular court. While most often played as a team sport with five players on each side, three-on-three, two-on-two, and one-on-one competitions are also common. The objective is to shoot a basketball (approximately 9.4 inches (24 cm) in diameter) through a hoop 18 inches (46 cm) in diameter and 10 feet (3.048 m) high that is mounted to a backboard at each end of the court. The game was invented in 1891 by Dr. James Naismith. A team can score a field goal by shooting the ball through the basket being defended by the opposition team during regular play. A field goal scores three points for the shooting team if the player shoots from behind the three-point line, and two points if shot from in front of the line. A team can also score via free throws, which are worth one point, after the other team is assessed with certain fouls
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1917 College Football Season
The 1917 NCAA football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
Football Records Book listing Georgia Tech as national champions, the South's first.[1] Pittsburgh, Ohio State, Texas A&M, Williams, and Washington State were also undefeated, and one-loss Navy was strong. Tech coach John Heisman
John Heisman
challenged Pitt coach Pop Warner to a postseason contest to determine a national champion, but as such a match did not occur until the next season, Tech was named national champion. The Golden Tornado was invited to play a 4–3 Oregon team in the Rose Bowl, but by then many players had joined the war effort. In the second week of play, Georgia Tech beat Penn 41–0
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1906 College Football Season
The 1906 IAAUS football season was the first played under the authority of the IAAUS (now the NCAA) and the first in which the forward pass was permitted. Although there was no clear cut national championship, there were two teams that had won all nine of their games as the 1906 season drew to a close, the Princeton Tigers and the Yale Bulldogs, and on November 17, 1906, they played to a 0-0 tie. St. Louis University finished at 11-0-0
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College Football
College football
College football
is American football
American football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football
Canadian football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football
American football
rules first gained popularity in the United States. Unlike most other sports in North America, no minor league farm organizations exist in American or Canadian football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football
American football
in the United States and Canadian football
Canadian football
in Canada; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition
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1907 College Football Season
The 1907 IAAUS football season saw the increased use of the forward pass, which had been legalized the year before. Football remained a dangerous game, despite the "debrutalization" reforms, and an unprecedented eleven players were killed (9 high school and 2 college), while 98 others were seriously injured.[1] However, there were no serious injuries reported among the major colleges.[1] The Yale Bulldogs, unbeaten with a record of 10-0-1, had the best record. The Helms Athletic Foundation, founded in 1936, declared retroactively that Yale had been the best college football team of 1907.[2] Yale and Penn both claim 1907 as a national championship season. While Yale was named as champion by 6 different entities, Penn was not named champion by any
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1909 College Football Season
The 1909 IAAUS football season was the first for the 3-point field goal, which had previously been worth 4 points.[1] The season ran from Saturday, September 25, until Thanksgiving Day, November 25, although a few games were played on the week before.[2] The 1909 season was also one of the most dangerous in the history of college football. The third annual survey by the Chicago Tribune
Chicago Tribune
at season's end showed that 10 college players had been killed and 38 seriously injured in 1909, up from six fatalities and 14 maimings in 1908.[3] Schools in the Midwest competed in the Western Conference, now called the Big Ten, consisting of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Northwestern, Purdue and Wisconsin and Chicago. Iowa was also a member of the Missouri Valley Conference, which included future Big 12
Big 12
teams Iowa State, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska, as well as Drake and Washington University in St. Louis
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1910 College Football Season
The 1910 NCAA football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
Football Records Book listing Harvard and Pittsburgh as having been selected national champions.[1] Only Harvard claims a national championship for the 1910 season.Contents1 Rules 2 Conference and program changes2.1 Conference changes 2.2 Program changes3 Conference standings3.1 Minor conferences4 See also 5 ReferencesRules[edit] Rule changes were made prior to the 1910 season to permit more use of the forward pass, with complicated limitations:[2]
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1911 College Football Season
The 1911 NCAA football season was the last one before major reforms were made to the American game in 1912. In 1911, touchdowns were worth five points, the field was 110 yards in length, and a team had three downs within which to advance the ball ten yards. Although no team finished the season unbeaten and untied, the United States Naval Academy (Navy) finished with a record of 6 wins and 3 ties (6-0-3). Two of the ties were 0-0 games with the other major unbeaten teams, Penn State (8-0-1) and Princeton (8-0-2). Other teams that finished the season unbeaten were Minnesota (6-0-1) and Florida (5-0-1)
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1912 College Football Season
The 1912 NCAA football season was the first of the modern era, as the NCAA implemented changes to increase scoring:Teams were given 4 downs instead of 3 downs to gain ten yards The value of a touchdown was increased from 5 points to 6 points The field was reduced from 110 yards to 100 yards, and end zones of ten yards were added Kickoff was made from the 40 yard line rather than midfield.[1]Contents1 Conference and program changes1.1 Conference changes 1.2 Membership changes2 September 3 October 4 November 5 Conference standings5.1 Minor conferences6 Awards and honors6.1 All-Americans 6.2 Statistical leaders7 ReferencesConference and program changes[edit] Conference changes[edit]Five conferences began play in 1912:
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