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Jersey City, New Jersey
Jersey City is the second-most-populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey, after Newark.[28] It is the seat of Hudson County
Hudson County
as well as the county's largest city.[29] As of 2016, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated that Jersey City's population was 264,152,[22] with the largest population increase of any municipality in New Jersey
New Jersey
since 2010,[30] an increase of about 6.7% from the 2010 United States
United States
Census, when the city's population was at 247,597,[21][31] ranking the city the 77th-largest in the nation.[32] Part of the New York metropolitan area, Jersey City is bounded on the east by the Hudson River
Hudson River
and Upper New York Bay
Upper New York Bay
and on the west by the Hackensack River
Hackensack River
and Newark Bay
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City (New Jersey)
A City
City
in the context of New Jersey
New Jersey
local government refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. Despite the widely held perception of a city as a large, urban area, cities in New Jersey
New Jersey
have a confused history as a form of government and vary in size from large, densely populated areas to much smaller hamlets. History[edit] The 1897 and 1899 city charter laws applied only to areas with a population under 12,000, and provided for a directly elected mayor, who served a two-year term and had strong executive powers. Both featured a council elected from wards to staggered three-year terms, plus one councilman elected at-large for a term of two years. The Mayor had veto power, which could be overridden by a two-thirds vote of the Council
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Population Estimates Program
The Population Estimates Program (PEP) is a program of the US Census Bureau that publishes annual population estimates and estimates of birth, death, and international migration rates for people in the United States.[1] In addition to publishing those aggregate estimates for the entire country, the program also publishes those yearly estimates by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin at the national, state, county and city and town level
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Eastern Daylight Time
The Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(ET) is a time zone encompassing 17 U.S. states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States, parts of eastern Canada, the state of Quintana Roo
Quintana Roo
in Mexico, Panama
Panama
in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. Places that use Eastern Standard Time (EST) when observing standard time (autumn/winter) are 5 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−05:00). Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), when observing daylight saving time DST (spring/summer) is 4 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−04:00). In the northern parts of the time zone, on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. EST, clocks are advanced to 3:00 a.m. EDT leaving a one-hour "gap". On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00 a.m. EDT, clocks are moved back to 1:00 a.m. EST, thus "duplicating" one hour
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UTC-4
UTC−04:00 is a time offset that subtracts 4 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(e.g., Canada
Canada
and the United States) during the warm months of daylight saving time, as Eastern Daylight Time. The Atlantic Time Zone
Atlantic Time Zone
observes it during standard time (cold months)
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ZIP Code
ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan;[1] it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S
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Federal Information Processing Standards
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cas
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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Upper New York Bay
Coordinates: 40°40′06″N 74°02′44″W / 40.66833°N 74.04556°W / 40.66833; -74.04556New York Harbor, showing Upper New York Bay in red. It is connected to Lower New York Bay
Lower New York Bay
on the south by the Narrows. Ellis Island
Ellis Island
(north) and Liberty Island
Liberty Island
(south) are shown in the northwest corner of the bay.Upper New York Bay, or Upper Bay, is the traditional heart of the Port of New York and New Jersey, and often called New York Harbor
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UTC-5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
during standard time, and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time)
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Port Of Entry
In general, a port of entry (POE) is a place where one may lawfully enter a country. It typically has a staff of people who check passports and visas and inspect luggage to assure that contraband is not imported. International airports are usually ports of entry, as are road and rail crossings on a land border. Seaports can be used as ports of entry only if a dedicated customs presence is posted there. The choice of whether to become a port of entry is up to the civil authority controlling the port.Contents1 Airport
Airport
of entry1.1 Terminology 1.2 Stateless persons2 In the United States 3 Variations 4 See also 5 References Airport
Airport
of entry[edit] Main article: International airport An airport of entry (AOE) is an airport that provides customs and immigration services for incoming flights
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Mass Transit
Public transport
Public transport
(also known as public transportation, public transit, or mass transit) is transport of passengers by group travel systems available for use by the general public, typically managed on a schedule, operated on established routes, and that charge a posted fee for each trip.[1][2][3] Examples of public transport include city buses, trolleybuses, trams (or light rail) and passenger trains, rapid transit (metro/subway/underground, etc.) and ferries
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Financial Centre
A financial centre is a location that is home to a cluster of nationally or internationally significant financial services providers such as banks, investment managers, or stock exchanges.[4]:1 A prominent financial centre can be described as an international financial centre (IFC) or a global financial centre and is often also a global city. Regional and national financial centres interact with these leading centres and may act as business feeders or provide local access to them
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1930 United States Census
The Fifteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 Notes 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] DCC bbb The 1930 Census collected the following information:[1]address name relationship to head of family home owned or rentedif owned, value of home if rented, monthly rentwhether owned a radio set whether on a farm sex race age marital status and, if married, age at first marriage school attendance literacy birthplace of person, and their parents if foreign born:language spoken at home before coming to the U
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1980 United States Census
The Twentieth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1980 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]Address Name Household relationship Sex Race Age Marital status Whether of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descentIt was the first census not to ask for the name of the "head of household."[3] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1980 census, which contained over 100 questions
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