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Jeong Gu
Jeong Gu (1543–1620), also spelled as Jung Goo, was Korean philosopher, politician, historian and writer, Confucian scholars of the Joseon Dynastys. learn from Yi Hwang[1] and Cho Shik.[2] a key figure of the Neo-Confucian literati, he established the Yeongnam School and set up the Baikmaewon(백매원, 百梅園[3]), a private Confucian academy. his nickname was Hangang(한강, 寒岡)·Hoiyunyain(회연야인, 檜淵野人), courtesy name was Dogah(도가, 道可), Gabo(가보, 可父). he was korean Confucian scholars and Ideological successor of Yi Hwang and Cho Shik, moral support of South Man Party(남인, 南人) and North Man Party(북인, 北人)s
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Korean Name
A Korean name
Korean name
consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people
Korean people
in both South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. In the Korean language, ireum or seongmyeong usually refers to the family name (seong) and given name (ireum in a narrow sense) together. Traditional Korean family names typically consist of only one syllable. There is no middle name in the English language sense. Many Koreans have their given names made of a generational name syllable and an individually distinct syllable, though this practice is declining in the younger generations. The generational name syllable is shared by siblings in North Korea, and by all members of the same generation of an extended family in South Korea. Married men and women usually keep their full personal names, and children inherit the father's family name. The family names are subdivided into bon-gwan (clans), i.e
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Yi Hwang
Yi Hwang
Yi Hwang
(1501–1570) is one of the two most prominent Korean Confucian scholars of the Joseon Dynasty, the other being his younger contemporary Yi I
Yi I
(Yulgok).[1] A key figure of the Neo-Confucian literati, he established the Yeongnam School and set up the Dosan Seowon, a private Confucian academy.[2] Yi Hwang
Yi Hwang
is often referred to by his pen name Toegye ("Retreating Creek"). His courtesy name was Gyeongho.[3]Contents1 Life 2 Teachings 3 Selected works3.1 Ten Diagrams on Sage Learning4 In modern culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Yi Hwang
Yi Hwang
was born in Ongye-ri, Andong, North Gyeongsang
Gyeongsang
Province, in 1501
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Yu Hyung-won
Yu Hyeongwon (1622–1673), also spelled as Yoo Hyung-Won, was a politician and Neo-Confucianism
Neo-Confucianism
scholar and science scholar of the Korean Joseon Dynasty. He was Korean pioneer of the early silhak ("practical learning") school[1][2] as well as an avid social critic and scholar of the late Joseon period
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Yi Seo-woo
Yi Seou
Yi Seou
(1 March 1633 – 14 October 1709), also spelled as Lee Seo-Woo, was a Korean Joseon
Joseon
Dynasty politician, Neo-Confucian scholar, and early silhak writer. He was a member of the Southerners political faction. Works[edit]Songpa munjip (송파문집, 松坡文集) Gangsa (강사, 康史) Jangsanhuji (장산후지, 萇山後誌) Dongraeseungramhuji (동래승람서후지, 東萊勝覽書後誌)See also[edit]Heo Mok Yun Hyu Yun Seondo Yu Hyeongwon Seongho Yi IkExternal links[edit]Yi Seou:Nate Yi Seou Yi Seou:Naver Yi Seou:Korean historical persons information Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Yi SeouThis Korean biographical article is a stub
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Yun Hyu
Yun Hyu (윤휴; 尹鑴, 1617 – 1680) was a Korean Joseon Dynasty politician and Neo-Confucian scholar, poet. Yun was the political leader of the Southern (Nam-in) faction of the Joseon Dynasty. His courtesy name was Baegho[1] and Haheon, Yahbo. He was nominated to be a Jipyeong (持平, 지평) as a Yebinshijeong (禮賓寺正, 예빈시정) and had served in various other posts, before he left politics to absorb himself in scholarly pursuits. In 1660 he became a leading figure in the controversy regarding the mourning rituals over King Hyojong.[2] In 1674 he became involved again in a second round of the controversy, this time over the death of Queen Inseon
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Heo Mok
Heo Mok
Heo Mok
(Hangul: 허목; Hanja: 許穆; December 11, 1595 – April 27, 1682) was a Korean politician, scholar, and calligrapher during the Joseon
Joseon
Dynasty. Heo was most commonly known by the pen name Misu.[1][2] Mok was known as the best Chinese calligrapher of his time due to his unique calligraphy style. He became a governor at the age of 81, and was the first person in Korean history to hold such a high-ranking position without taking the Gwangeo civil service exam.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Early career 1.3 Political movements 1.4 Yesong arguments1.4.1 First Yesong argument 1.4.2 Second Yesong argument1.5 seize power 1.6 Ruin and death2 Books 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Early life[edit] Heo Mok
Heo Mok
was born at Changseonbang (창선방) in Hanseong
Hanseong
(Seoul)
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Nanman
The Man, commonly called the Nanman
Nanman
or Southern Man (Chinese: 南蠻), were the ancient indigenous peoples who lived in inland South and Southwest China, mainly the Yangtze
Yangtze
River valley. They are believed by scholars to be related to the Sanmiao in ancient Chinese texts. The Nanman
Nanman
included multiple ethnic groups, probably related to the predecessors of the modern Zhuang, Tai, Miao (Hmong) peoples, and non-Chinese Sino-Tibetan groups such as the Bai people. There was never a single polity that united these people, although the major state of Chu ruled over much of the Yangtze
Yangtze
region during the Zhou dynasty and was heavily influenced by the Man culture. Etymology[edit] The early Chinese exonym Man (蠻) was a graphic pejorative written with Radical 142
Radical 142
虫, the "insect" or "reptile" radical
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Neo-Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
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List Of Korean Family Names
This is a list of Korean family names, in Hangul
Hangul
alphabetical order. Note: (S) denotes South Korea. (N) denotes North Korea. The most common Korean family name (particularly in South Korea) is Kim, followed by Lee and Park. These three family names are held by around half of the ethnic Korean population
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Joseon Dynasty
The Joseon
Joseon
dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosun, Korean: 조선; also known as Joseon
Joseon
of the House of Yi, Korean: 리조조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, Korean: 대조선국) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries. It was founded by Yi Seong-gye
Yi Seong-gye
in July 1392 and was replaced by the Korean Empire
Korean Empire
in October 1897.[5] It was founded following the aftermath of the overthrow of Goryeo
Goryeo
in what is today the city of Kaesong. Early on, Korea
Korea
was retitled and the capital was relocated to modern-day Seoul. The kingdom's northernmost borders were expanded to the natural boundaries at the rivers of Amnok and Tuman through the subjugation of the Jurchens
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Korea
Korea
Korea
(/kəˈriːə/) is a historical region in East Asia; since 1945, it has been divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea") and South Korea
Korea
(officially the "Republic of Korea"). Located on the Korean Peninsula, Korea
Korea
is bordered by China
China
to the northwest and Russia
Russia
to the northeast. It is separated from Japan
Japan
to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan
Japan
(East Sea). Korea
Korea
emerged as a singular political entity in 676 AD, after centuries of conflict among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, which were unified as Unified Silla
Unified Silla
to the south and Balhae
Balhae
to the north
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Posthumous Name
A posthumous name is an honorary name given to royalty, nobles, and sometimes others, in East Asia
East Asia
after the person's death, and is used almost exclusively instead of one's personal name or other official titles during his life
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