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Jenna Bush Hager
Jenna Bush Hager
Jenna Bush Hager
(born Jenna Welch Bush; November 25, 1981)[1] is an American news personality, American teacher, author, and journalist. She is the younger of the sororal twin daughters of the 43rd U.S. President
President
George W. Bush
George W. Bush
and former First Lady Laura Bush, and a granddaughter of the 41st U.S. President
President
George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush
and former First Lady Barbara Bush. She and her sister Barbara were the first twin children of a U.S. president. After her father's presidency, Hager became an author, serves as an editor-at-large for Southern Living
Southern Living
magazine, and also a television personality on NBC, being featured most prominently as a member of The Today Show as a correspondent
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Henry G. Hager
Henry G. Hager III (born April 28, 1934)[2] is a former member of the Pennsylvania State Senate who served from 1973 to 1984.[3] He was the Lycoming County District Attorney from 1964 to 1968.[4] References[edit]^ "Index to politicians:Hager". The Political Graveyard. The Political Graveyard. 2010-01-01. Retrieved 2010-01-01.  ^ [1] ^ Cox, Harold. "Senate Members H". Wilkes University Election Statistics Project. Wilkes University.  ^ "Index to politicians:Hager". The Political Graveyard. The Political Graveyard. 2010-01-01. Retrieved 2010-01-01. This article about a member of the Pennsylvania State Senate is a stub
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Swing State
In American politics, the term swing state refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican presidential candidate. These states are usually targeted by both major-party campaigns, especially in competitive elections.[1] Meanwhile, the states that regularly lean to a single party are known as safe states, as it is generally assumed that one candidate has a base of support from which they can draw a sufficient share of the electorate. Due to the winner-take-all style of the Electoral College, candidates often campaign only in competitive states, which is why a select group of states frequently receives a majority of the advertisements and partisan media.[2] The battlegrounds may change in certain election cycles, and may be reflected in overall polling, demographics, and the ideological appeal of the nominees
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New York University
Coordinates: 40°43′48″N 73°59′42″W / 40.73000°N 73.99500°W / 40.73000; -73.99500New York UniversityLatin: Universitas Neo EboracensisMotto Perstare et praestare (Latin)Motto in EnglishTo persevere and to excelType Private[1]Established 1831[1]Endowment $3.991 billion (2017)[2]Budget $11.945 billion (fiscal 2018)[3]Chairman William R. Berkley[4]President Andrew D. HamiltonProvost Katherine E
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Kappa Alpha Theta
Court Appointed Special
Special
Advocates (CASA), Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Alpha Theta
Foundation, The Friendship FundChapters 212 collegiate, 200+ alumnaeMembers 270,000+ collegiateHeadquarters 8740 Founders Road Indianapolis, Indiana United StatesWebsite http://www.kappaalphatheta.org/ Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Alpha Theta
(ΚΑΘ), also known simply as Theta, is an international sorority founded on Jan. 27, 1870 at DePauw University, formerly Indiana
Indiana
Asbury. Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Alpha Theta
was the first Greek-letter fraternity for women.[1] The organization currently has more than 145 chapters at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. Theta's total living initiated membership as of January 23, 2017, totals more than 270,000. There are more than 200 alumnae chapters and circles worldwide
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Misdemeanor
A misdemeanor (American English,[1] spelled misdemeanour in British English) is any "lesser" criminal act in some common law legal systems. Misdemeanors are generally punished less severely than felonies, but theoretically more so than administrative infractions (also known as minor, petty, or summary offences) and regulatory offences
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Identity Document Forgery
Identity document
Identity document
forgery is the process by which identity documents issued by governing bodies are copied and/or modified by persons not authorized to create such documents or engage in such modifications, for the purpose of deceiving those who would view the documents about the identity or status of the bearer. The term also encompasses the activity of acquiring identity documents from governing bodies by falsifying the required supporting documentation in order to create the desired identity. Identity documents differ from other credentials in that they are intended to be usable by only the person holding the card
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Nolo Contendere
Nolo contendere is a legal term that comes from the Latin
Latin
phrase for "I do not wish to contend" and it is also referred to as a plea of no contest. In criminal trials in certain United States jurisdictions, it is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty. A no-contest plea, while not technically a guilty plea, has the same immediate effect as a guilty plea and is often offered as a part of a plea bargain.[1] In many jurisdictions a plea of nolo contendere is not a typical right and carries various restrictions on its use.Contents1 United States1.1 Residual effects 1.2 Alaska 1.3 California 1.4 Florida 1.5 Texas 1.6 Virginia2 Commonwealth 3 See also 4 ReferencesUnited States[edit] In the United States, State law determines whether, and under what circumstances, a defendant may plead no contest in state criminal cases
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English Studies
English studies
English studies
(usually called simply English) is an academic discipline taught in primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in English-speaking countries; it is not to be confused with English taught as a foreign language, which is a distinct discipline
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Inauguration Day
The inauguration of the President of the United States
President of the United States
is a ceremony to mark the commencement of a new four-year term of the President of the United States. This ceremony takes place for each new presidential term, even if the president is continuing in office for a second term. Since 1937, it has taken place on January 20, which is 72 to 78 days after the November presidential election (on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November). The term of a president commences at noon ("EST" – Eastern Standard Time) on that day, when the Chief Justice of the United States administers the oath of office to the president. However, when January 20 falls on a Sunday, the chief justice administers the oath to the president on that day privately and then again in a public ceremony the next day, on Monday, January 21
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St. Louis
St. Louis
St. Louis
Lambert International Airport MidAmerica St. Louis
St. Louis
AirportWaterways Mississippi RiverWebsite stlouis-mo.gov St. Louis
St. Louis
(/seɪnt ˈluːɪs/)[10][11][12] is an independent city[13] and major U.S. port in the state of Missouri, built along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which marks Missouri's border with Illinois. The city had an estimated March 22, 2018 population of 308,626[8] and is the cultural and economic center of the Greater St. Louis area (home to 2,807,338 people ), making it the largest metropolitan area in Missouri
Missouri
and the 19th-largest in the United States. Prior to European settlement, the area was a major regional center of Native American Mississippian culture. The city of St. Louis
St

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Vogue (magazine)
Vogue is a fashion and lifestyle magazine covering many topics including fashion, beauty, culture, living, and runway. Vogue began as a weekly newspaper in 1892 in the United States, before becoming a monthly publication years later. The British Vogue was the first international edition launched in 1916, while the Italian version has been called the top fashion magazine in the world.[2]
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Dallas
Dallas, officially City
City
of Dallas, is within the 4th most populous metropolitan area in the United States.[8] Dallas
Dallas
is a modern metropolis city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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UNICEF
The United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund[3] ( UNICEF
UNICEF
/ˈjuːnɪsɛf/)[4] is a United Nations
United Nations
(UN) program headquartered in New York City
New York City
that provides humanitarian and developmental assistance to children and mothers in developing countries. It is a member of the United Nations Development Group. The United Nations
United Nations
International Children's Emergency Fund was created by the United Nations
United Nations
General Assembly on the 11th of December 1946, to provide emergency food and healthcare to children in countries that had been devastated by World War II. The Polish physician Ludwik Rajchman is widely regarded as the founder of UNICEF
UNICEF
and served as its first chairman from 1946
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Latin America
Latin
Latin
America[a] is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Spanish, French and Portuguese are spoken. The term originated in the French government in the mid-19th century as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas
Americas
(Haiti, French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed. It is, therefore, broader than the terms Ibero-America
Ibero-America
or Hispanic
Hispanic
America. The term excludes French Canada and modern French Louisiana. Latin
Latin
America consists of nineteen sovereign states and several territories and dependencies which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico
Mexico
to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean
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