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Jelly Roll Morton
Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe (October 20, 1890 – July 10, 1941),[1] known professionally as Jelly Roll Morton, was an American ragtime and early jazz pianist, bandleader and composer who started his career in New Orleans, Louisiana. Widely recognized as a pivotal figure in early jazz, Morton is perhaps most notable as jazz's first arranger, proving that a genre rooted in improvisation could retain its essential spirit and characteristics when notated.[2] His composition "Jelly Roll Blues", published in 1915, was the first published jazz composition
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New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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Gunther Schuller
Gunther Alexander Schuller (November 22, 1925 – June 21, 2015)[1] was an American composer, conductor, horn player, author, historian and jazz musician.Contents1 Biography and works1.1 Early years 1.2 Performance and growth 1.3 Career maturity 1.4 Accomplishments in final decades2 Awards and recognition 3 Partial Discography3.1 As arranger 3.2 As conductor 3.3 As sideman4 Books 5 References 6 External linksBiography and works[edit] Early years[edit] Schuller was born in Queens, New York City,[1] the son of German parents Elsie (Bernartz) and Arthur E. Schuller, a violinist with the New York Philharmonic.[2] He studied at the Saint Thomas Choir School and became an accomplished French horn
French horn
player and flute player
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Gary, Indiana
U.S. RoutesState RoutesAirportGary/ Chicago
Chicago
International[6]WaterwaysGrand Calumet River Lake Michigan South Shore Line
South Shore Line
stationsAdam Benjamin Metro Center Gary/ Chicago
Chicago
Airport – MillerPublic transit Gary Public Transportation Corp.Website Official websiteGary (/ɡɛəri/) is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States, 25 miles (40 km) from downtown Chicago, Illinois. The population of Gary was 80,294 at the 2010 census,[7] making it the ninth-largest city in the state of Indiana
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Barney Bigard
Albany Leon "Barney" Bigard[1] (March 3, 1906 – June 27, 1980) was an American jazz clarinetist known for his 15-year tenure with Duke Ellington. He also played tenor saxophone.Contents1 Biography 2 Barney Bigard
Barney Bigard
and His Jazzopators 3 Death 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksBiography[edit] Bigard was born in New Orleans
New Orleans
to a family of Creoles. The son of Alexander and Emanuella Bigard, he had two brothers, Alexander Jr. and Sidney.[2] His uncle, Emile Bigard, was a jazz violinist.[3] He attended local schools and studied music and clarinet with Lorenzo Tio. In the early 1920s he moved to Chicago, where he worked with King Oliver and others
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Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver
(/vænˈkuːvər/ ( listen), locally usually [væŋ-][4]) is a coastal seaport city in Canada, located in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia. As the most populous city in the province, the 2016 census recorded 631,486 people in the city, up from 603,502 in 2011. The Greater Vancouver
Greater Vancouver
area had a population of 2,463,431 in 2016, making it the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada. Vancouver
Vancouver
has the highest population density in Canada
Canada
with over 5,400 people per square kilometre,[5][6] which makes it the fourth-most densely populated city with over 250,000 residents in North America
North America
behind New York City, San Francisco,[7] and Mexico City according to the 2011 census
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Hastings Street (Vancouver)
Hastings Street is one of the most important east-west traffic corridors in the cities of Vancouver
Vancouver
and Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada,[2] and used to be a part of the decommissioned Highway 7A. In the central business district of Downtown Vancouver
Vancouver
it is known as West Hastings Street; at Carrall Street it becomes East Hastings Street and runs eastwards through East Vancouver
Vancouver
and Burnaby. In Burnaby, there is no east-west designation
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Tango Music
Tango
Tango
is a style of music in 2 4 or 4 4 time that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina
Argentina
(collectively, the "Rioplatenses").[1] It is traditionally played on a solo guitar, guitar duo, or an ensemble, known as the orquesta típica, which includes at least two violins, flute, piano, double bass, and at least two bandoneóns. Sometimes guitars and a clarinet join the ensemble. Tango
Tango
may be purely instrumental or may include a vocalist. Tango
Tango
music and dance have become popular throughout the world.Contents1 Origins 2 Argentine roots of Tango 3 1920s and 1930s, Carlos Gardel 4 Golden Age 5 Tango
Tango
nuevo 6 Neotango 7 New tango songs 8 Musical impact and classical interpreters 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksOrigins[edit]Early bandoneón, constructed ca
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Willie "The Lion" Smith
William Henry Joseph Bonaparte Bertholoff Smith (November 25, 1897[1] – April 18, 1973), also known as "The Lion", was an American jazz pianist and one of the masters of the stride style, usually grouped with James P. Johnson
James P. Johnson
and Thomas "Fats" Waller
Thomas "Fats" Waller
as the three greatest practitioners of the genre in its golden age, from about 1920 to 1943.Contents1 Early life 2 Music career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Legacy 6 Recordings 7 Discography 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] William Henry Joseph Bonaparte Bertholoff was born in Goshen, New York
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Stride (music)
Harlem Stride Piano, stride piano, commonly abbreviated to stride, is a jazz piano style that was developed in the large cities of the East Coast of the United States, mainly New York City, during the 1920s and 1930s. The left hand characteristically plays a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, major seventh or major tenth Interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats. Occasionally this pattern is reversed by placing the chord on the downbeat and bass note(s) on the upbeat. Unlike performers of the ragtime popularized by Scott Joplin
Scott Joplin
and unlike much early jazz, stride players' left hands often leapt greater distances on the keyboard,[1] and they played in a wider range of tempos and with a greater emphasis on improvisation. Thomas "Fats" Waller
Thomas "Fats" Waller
(1904–1943), a student of James P
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(/lɔːs ˈændʒələs/ (listen);[a] Spanish: Los Ángeles; Spanish for "The Angels"),[16] officially the City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million,[11] Los Angeles
Los Angeles
is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood, the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis
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Minstrel Shows
The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American form of entertainment developed in the early 19th century. Each show consisted of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music performances that mocked people specifically of African descent. The shows were performed by Caucasians in make-up or blackface for the purpose of playing the role of black people. There were also some African-American
African-American
performers and all-black minstrel groups that formed and toured under the direction of white people. Minstrel shows lampooned black people as dim-witted,[1] lazy,[1] buffoonish,[1][2] superstitious, and happy-go-lucky.[1] Minstrel shows emerged as brief burlesques and comic entr'actes in the early 1830s in the Northeastern states. They were developed into full-fledged form in the next decade
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Rex Stewart
Rex William Stewart (February 22, 1907 – September 7, 1967) was an American jazz cornetist best remembered for his work with the Duke Ellington orchestra. After stints with Elmer Snowden, Fletcher Henderson, Horace Henderson, McKinney's Cotton Pickers, and Luis Russell, Stewart joined the Ellington band in 1934, replacing Freddie Jenkins. Duke Ellington arranged many of his pieces to showcase Stewart's half-valve effects, muted sound, and forceful style. Stewart co-wrote "Boy Meets Horn" and "Morning Glory" while with Ellington, and frequently supervised outside recording sessions by members of the Ellington band. After eleven years Stewart left to lead his own groups - " little swing bands, that were a perfect setting for his solo playing."[1] He also toured Europe and Australia with Jazz
Jazz
at the Philharmonic from 1947 to 1951
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Downtown New Orleans
In New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, downtown has historically referred to neighborhoods along the Mississippi River, downriver (roughly northeast) from Canal Street — including the French Quarter, Tremé, Faubourg Marigny, Bywater, the 9th Ward, and other neighborhoods. Contrary to the common usage of the term downtown in other cities, this historic application of the term excluded the New Orleans Central Business District. The term continues to be employed as it has been historically, although many younger people and migrants from other parts of the country will use "downtown" as it is used elsewhere; that is, to mean the Central Business District/Warehouse District area.Canal Street at night, looking away from the river towards Mid-City; the traditional dividing line.Contents1 History 2 Education 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the 19th century, much of New Orleans' downtown (downriver from Canal Street) was still predominantly Francophone
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