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Jean-François Lyotard
Jean-François Lyotard
Jean-François Lyotard
(French: [ʒɑ̃ fʁɑ̃swa ljɔtaʁ]; 10 August 1924 – 21 April 1998) was a French philosopher, sociologist, and literary theorist. His interdisciplinary discourse spans such topics as epistemology and communication, the human body, modern art and postmodern art, literature and critical theory, music, film, time and memory, space, the city and landscape, the sublime, and the relation between aesthetics and politics. He is best known for his articulation of postmodernism after the late 1970s and the analysis of the impact of postmodernity on the human condition
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Leotard
A leotard /ˈliəˌtɑːrd/ is a unisex skin-tight one-piece garment that covers the torso but leaves the legs exposed. The garment was first made famous by the French acrobatic performer Jules Léotard (1838–1870). There are sleeveless, short-sleeved and long-sleeved leotards. A variation is the unitard, which also covers the legs. Leotards are worn by acrobats, gymnasts, dancers, figure skaters, athletes, actors, and circus performers both as practice garments and performance costumes. They are often worn together with ballet skirts on top and tights[1] or sometimes bike shorts as underwear. As a casual garment, a leotard can be worn with a belt; it can also be worn under overalls or short skirts. Leotards are entered through the neck (in contrast to bodysuits which generally have snaps at the crotch, allowing the garment to be pulled on over the head). Scoop-necked leotards have wide neck openings and are held in place by the elasticity of the garment
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Collège International De Philosophie
The Collège international de philosophie (Ciph), located in Paris' 5th arrondissement, is a tertiary education institute placed under the trusteeship of the French government department of research and chartered under the French 1901 Law on associations. It was co-founded in 1983 by Jacques Derrida, François Châtelet, Jean-Pierre Faye
Jean-Pierre Faye
and Dominique Lecourt
Dominique Lecourt
in an attempt to re-think the teaching of philosophy in France, and to liberate it from any institutional authority (most of all from the University). Its financing is mainly through public funds.[1] Its chairs or "directors of program" are competitively elected for 6 years (non renewable), following an international open call for proposals (every third year). Proposals are free and directors are elected after a collegial, peer-assessment of their value for philosophy
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French People
118,000[17][18]Other countries Mexico 60,000[19] Algeria 32,000[10] China 31,000[10] Luxembourg 31,000[10][20] Hong Kong 25,000[21] Netherlands 23,000[10] Senegal 20,000[10] Mauritius 15,000[22] Monaco 10,000[23] Sweden 9,005[24] Austria8,246[25]LanguagesFrench and other languages (Langues d'oïl Occitan Auvergnat Corsican Catalan Franco-Provençal German (Alsatian & Franconian) Dutch (French Flemish) Breton Basque)ReligionPredominantly Roman Catholicism[26] Minority : Protestantism Judaism IslamRelated ethnic groupsCeltic peoples Romance peoples Germanic peoplesThe French (French: Français) are an ethnic group[27][28][29] and nation who are identified with the country of France
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Le Père Lachaise Cemetery
Père Lachaise Cemetery
Cemetery
(French: Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, [simtjɛːʁ dy pɛːʁ laʃɛːz]; formerly, cimetière de l'Est, " Cemetery
Cemetery
of the East") is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres),[1] although there are larger cemeteries in the city's suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery.[2] It is also the site of three World War I
World War I
memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Mènilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station named Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public
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J. L. Austin
John Langshaw "J. L." Austin (26 March 1911 – 8 February 1960) was a British philosopher of language and leading proponent of ordinary language philosophy, perhaps best known for developing the theory of speech acts.[3] Austin pointed out that we use language to do things as well as to assert things, and that the utterance of a statement like "I promise to do so-and-so" is best understood as doing something — making a promise — rather than making an assertion about anything
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Émile Durkheim
David Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
(French: [emil dyʁkɛm] or [dyʁkajm];[1] April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917) was a French sociologist. He formally established the academic discipline and—with Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.[2][3] Much of Durkheim's work was concerned with how societies could maintain their integrity and coherence in modernity; an era in which traditional social and religious ties are no longer assumed, and in which new social institutions have come into being. His first major sociological work was The Division of Labour in Society
The Division of Labour in Society
(1893)
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Talcott Parsons
Talcott Parsons (December 13, 1902 – May 8, 1979) was an American sociologist of the classical tradition, best known for his social action theory and structural functionalism. Parsons is considered one of the most influential figures in the development of sociology in the 20th century.[1] After earning a PhD in economics, he served on the faculty at Harvard University
Harvard University
from 1927 to 1929. In 1930, he was among the first professors in its new sociology department.[2] Based on empirical data, Parsons' social action theory was the first broad, systematic, and generalizable theory of social systems developed in the United States.[3] Some of Parsons' largest contributions to sociology in the English-speaking world were his translations of Max Weber's work and his analyses of works by Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Vilfredo Pareto
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Karl Marx
Karl Marx[6] (/mɑːrks/;[7] German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈmaɐ̯ks]; 5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Trier
Trier
to a middle-class family, Marx studied law and Hegelian philosophy. Due to his political publications Marx became stateless and lived in exile in London, where he continued to develop his thought in collaboration with German thinker Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
and publish his writings. His best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist
Communist
Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital
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Sociology
Sociology
Sociology
is the scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture.[1][2][3] It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation[4] and critical analysis[5] to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change. Many sociologists aim to conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, while others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.[6] The traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance
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Judaism
Judaism
Judaism
(originally from Hebrew יהודה‬, Yehudah, "Judah";[1][2] via Latin
Latin
and Greek) is an ancient, monotheistic, Abrahamic religion with the Torah
Torah
as its foundational text.[3] It encompasses the religion, philosophy and culture of the Jewish people.[4] Judaism
Judaism
is considered by religious Jews
Jews
to be the expression of the covenant that God
God
established with the Children of Israel.[5] Judaism
Judaism
includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization. The Torah
Torah
is part of the larger text known as the Tanakh or the Hebrew Bible, and supplemental oral tradition represented by later texts such as the Midrash
Midrash
and the Talmud
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Léotard
Léotard is a French surname. Notable people with the surname include: Christophe Léotard (born 1966), French chess player François Léotard
François Léotard
(born 1942), French politician Jules Léotard
Jules Léotard
(1838–1870), French acrobat Philippe Léotard (1940–2001), French actorSee also[edit]LeotardThis page lists people with the surname Léotard
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University Of California, Irvine
The University
University
of California, Irvine (UCI, UC Irvine, or Irvine), is a public research university located in Irvine, Orange County, California, United States, and one of the 10 campuses in the University of California
University of California
(UC) system. UC Irvine offers 80 undergraduate degrees and 98 graduate and professional degrees
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University Of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Normal School (1885–1927) Milwaukee
Milwaukee
State Teachers
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University Of California, Berkeley
Urban Total 1,232 acres (499 ha) Core Campus 178 acres (72 ha)[5] Total land owned 6,679 acres (2,703 ha)[6]Colors Berkeley Blue, California
California
Gold[7]          Athletics NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS – Pac-12Nickname Golden BearsSporting affiliationsAm. East MPSFMascot Oski the BearWebsite www.berkeley.eduThe University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, or California[8][9]) is a public research university in Berkeley, California.[9] Founded in 1868, Berkeley is the flagship institution of the ten research universities affiliated with the University of California
California
system
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University Of California, San Diego
The University of California, San Diego[a] is a public research university located in the La Jolla
La Jolla
neighborhood of San Diego, California, in the United States.[12] The university occupies 2,141 acres (866 ha) near the coast of the Pacific Ocean with the main campus resting on approximately 1,152 acres (466 ha).[13] Established in 1960 near the pre-existing Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC
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