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Japanese Unit
Traditional Japanese units of measurement
Japanese units of measurement
or the shakkanhō (尺貫法, "shaku–kan system") is the traditional system of measurement used by the people of the Japanese archipelago. It is largely based on the Chinese system, which spread to Japan and the rest of the Sinosphere
Sinosphere
in antiquity. It has remained mostly unaltered since the adoption of the measures of the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
in AD 701.[citation needed] Following the Meiji Restoration, Imperial Japan
Imperial Japan
adopted the metric system and defined the traditional units in metric terms on the basis of a prototype metre and kilogram. The present values of most Korean and Taiwanese units of measurement derive from these values as well, owing to their occupations by the Japanese. For a time in the early 20th century, the traditional, metric, and English systems were all legal in Japan
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Yard (unit)
The yard (abbreviation: yd) is an English unit of length, in both the British imperial and US customary systems of measurement, that comprises 3 feet or 36 inches. It is by international agreement in 1959 standardized as exactly 0.9144 meters. A metal yardstick originally formed the physical standard from which all other units of length were officially derived in both English systems. In the 19th and 20th centuries, increasingly powerful microscopes and scientific measurement detected variation in these prototype yards which became significant as technology improved
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Empire Of Japan
The Empire of Japan
Japan
(大日本帝國, Dai Nippon Teikoku, literally meaning "Great Japanese Empire")[9] was the historical nation-state[nb 2] and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.[1] Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富國強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Armed Forces") led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire
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Kanji
Kanji
Kanji
(漢字; [kandʑi]  listen) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters
Chinese characters
that are used in the Japanese writing system.[1] They are used alongside hiragana and katakana
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Metre
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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US Foot
The foot (pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard. Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade
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Square Metre
The square metre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures) or square meter (American spelling) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of area, with symbol m2 (33A1 in Unicode[1]). It is the area of a square whose sides measure exactly one metre. The square metre is derived from the SI base unit
SI base unit
of the metre, which itself is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in absolute vacuum during a time interval of 1/299 792 458 of a second. Adding and subtracting SI prefixes creates multiples and submultiples; however, as the unit is squared, the order of magnitude difference between units doubles from their comparable linear units
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Square Foot
The square foot (plural square feet; abbreviated sq ft, sf, ft2) is an imperial unit and U.S. customary unit
U.S. customary unit
(non-SI, non-metric) of area, used mainly in the United States and partially in Bangladesh, Canada, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Singapore and the United Kingdom.[citation needed] It is defined as the area of a square with sides of 1 foot. Although the pluralisation is regular in the noun form, when used as an adjective, the singular is preferred. So, a flat measuring 700 square feet could be described as a 700 square-foot flat. This corresponds to common linguistic usage of foot. A symbol for square foot, square feet, and "per square foot" commonly used in architecture, real estate and interior floor plans is a simple square with a vertical line bisecting it—⏍
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Litre
The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (symbols L or l,[1] sometimes abbreviated ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume [2] — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI,[3] although not an SI unit — the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3)
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Kilogram
The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram
Kilogram
(IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"),[2] a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures
International Bureau of Weights and Measures
at Saint-Cloud, France. The kilogram was originally defined as the mass of a litre (cubic decimetre) of water at its freezing point. That was an inconvenient quantity to precisely replicate, so in the late 18th century a platinum artefact was fashioned as a standard for the kilogram
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Pound (mass)
The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. Various definitions have been used; the most common today is the international avoirdupois pound, which is legally defined as exactly 6999453592370000000♠0.45359237 kilograms, and which is divided into 16 avoirdupois ounces.[1] The international standard symbol for the avoirdupois pound is lb;[2] an alternative symbol is lbm[3] (for most pound definitions), # (chiefly in the U.S.), and ℔[4] or ″̶[5] (specifically for the apothecaries' pound). The unit is descended from the Roman libra (hence the abbreviation "lb"). The English word pound is cognate with, among others, German Pfund, Dutch pond, and Swedish pund
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Japan In World War I
Japan participated in World War I
World War I
from 1914 to 1918 in an alliance with Entente Powers and played an important role in securing the sea lanes in the West Pacific and Indian Oceans against the Imperial German Navy. Politically, Japan seized the opportunity to expand its sphere of influence in China, and to gain recognition as a great power in postwar geopolitics. Japan's military, taking advantage of the great distances and Germany's preoccupation with the war in Europe, seized German possessions in the Pacific and East Asia, but there was no large-scale mobilization of the economy.[1] Foreign Minister Katō Takaaki
Katō Takaaki
and Prime Minister Ōkuma Shigenobu
Ōkuma Shigenobu
wanted to use the opportunity to expand Japanese influence in China
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Treaty Of The Metre
The Metre
Metre
Convention (French: Convention du Mètre), also known as the Treaty of the Metre,[1] is an international treaty that was signed in Paris
Paris
on 20 May 1875 by representatives of 17 nations. (Argentina, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden
Sweden
and Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, United States
United States
of America, and Venezuela). The treaty set up an institute for the purpose of coordinating international metrology and for coordinating the development of the metric system. The treaty also set up associated organizations to oversee the running of the institute. Initially it was only concerned with the units of mass and length but, in 1921, at the 6th meeting of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM), it was revised and its mandate extended to cover all physical measurements
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Ministry Of Agriculture And Commerce
The Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
(農商務省, Nōshōmushō) was a cabinet-level ministry in the government of the Empire of Japan from 1881-1925.[1] It was briefly recreated as the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce (農商省, Nōshōshō) during World War IIContents1 History 2 Ministers of Agriculture and Commerce (Meiji-Taisho) 3 Ministers of Agriculture and Commerce (World War II) 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The original Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
was created on April 7, 1881, initially under the Meiji Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
Cabinet, and then re-established under the Meiji Constitution
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Education In Japan
Education
Education
in Japan
Japan
is compulsory at the elementary and lower secondary levels.[5] Most students attend public schools through the lower secondary level, but private education is popular at the upper secondary and university levels. Education
Education
prior to elementary school is provided at kindergartens and day-care centers. Public and private day-care centers take children from under age 1 on up to 5 years old. The programmes for those children aged 3–5 resemble those at kindergartens. The educational approach at kindergartens varies greatly from unstructured environments that emphasize play to highly structured environments that are focused on having the child pass the entrance exam at a private elementary school. The academic year starts from April and ends in March, having summer vacation in August and winter vacation in the end of December to the beginning of January
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Primary School
A primary school (or elementary school in American English
American English
and often in Canadian English) is a school in which children receive primary or elementary education from the age of about five to twelve, coming after preschool and before secondary school. (In some countries there is an intermediate stage of middle school between primary and secondary education.)Contents1 Primary Schools 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPrimary Schools[edit] In most parts of the world, primary education is the first stage of compulsory education, and is normally available without charge, but may be offered in a fee-paying independent school
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