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Japanese Railway Signals
Japanese railway signals, according to the ministerial decree defining technical standards of railways (鉄道に関する技術上の基準を定める省令, Tetsudō ni kansuru gijutsu jō no kijun wo sadameru shōrei), are defined as indicating operational conditions for railway staff driving trains. Japanese signalling was initially based on British railway signalling, and Japanese railway signalling continues to be based on the UK route signalling system
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Keihan Electric Railway
Keihan Electric Railway
Keihan Electric Railway
Co., Ltd. (京阪電気鉄道株式会社, Keihan Denki Tetsudō Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese railway operator in Osaka, Kyoto, and Shiga Prefectures. It is known as "Keihan" (京阪), "Keihan Dentetsu" (京阪電鉄) or "Keihan Densha" (京阪電車). It is subsidiary of Keihan Holdings, Ltd. (TYO: 9045).Contents1 History 2 Lines2.1 Current lines2.1.1 Keihan Lines 2.1.2 Ōtsu Lines 2.1.3 Other lines2.2 Closed lines 2.3 Unbuilt line3 Rolling stock3.1 Keihan Lines 3.2 Ōtsu Lines 3.3 Former rolling stock4 Fares4.1 Keihan Lines (Keihan Main Line, Oto Line, Nakanoshima Line, Katano Line, Uji Line) 4.2 Otsu Lines (Keishin Line, Ishiyama Sakamoto Line) 4.3 Cable line5 Etymology 6 Other businesses 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Keihan started its operation between Osaka
Osaka
and Kyoto
Kyoto
in 1910
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683 Series
The 683 series (683系, 683-kei) is a dual-voltage electric multiple unit (EMU) train type operated by West Japan Railway Company (JR-West) and Hokuetsu Express on limited express services in Japan since 2001.Contents1 Variants 2 Operations2.1 JR-West 2.2 Hokuetsu Express 2.3 JR Central3 Formations3.1 3-car sets3.1.1 Thunderbird sets 3.1.2 Shirasagi sets3.2 5-car sets3.2.1 Shirasagi sets3.3 6-car sets3.3.1 Thunderbird sets3.4 9-car sets3.4.1 Thunderbird sets4 Interior 5 Refurbishment 6 Conversion to 289 series 7 ReferencesVariants[edit]683-0 series (Thunderbird) 683-1000 series (Thunderbird) 683-2000 series (Thunderbird, former Shirasagi) 683-3000 series (Thunderbird, former Shirasagi) 683-4000 series (Thunderbird) 683-5000 series (Thunderbird) 683-8000 series (Shirasagi, former Hokuetsu Express Hakutaka)683-0 series683-4000 series683-8000 seriesOperation
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Electric Multiple Unit
An electric multiple unit or EMU is a multiple unit train consisting of self-propelled carriages, using electricity as the motive power. An EMU requires no separate locomotive, as electric traction motors are incorporated within one or a number of the carriages. An EMU is usually formed of two or more semi-permanently coupled carriages, but electrically powered single-unit railcars are also generally classed as EMUs. EMUs are popular on commuter and suburban rail networks around the world due to their fast acceleration and pollution-free operation.[1] Being quieter than diesel multiple units (DMU) and locomotive-drawn trains, EMUs can operate later at night and more frequently without disturbing nearby residents
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Yosan Line
The Yosan Line
Yosan Line
(予讃線, Yosan-sen) is the principal railway line on the island of Shikoku
Shikoku
in Japan, connecting the major cities of Shikoku, and via the Honshi-Bisan Line, with Honshu. It is operated by the Shikoku
Shikoku
Railway Company (JR Shikoku), and is aligned approximately parallel with the Inland Sea coast, connecting the prefectural capitals of Takamatsu (Kagawa Prefecture) and Matsuyama
Matsuyama
(Ehime Prefecture) and continuing on to Uwajima
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Matsuyama Station (Ehime)
Matsuyama Station (松山駅, Matsuyama-eki) is a JR Shikoku railway station on the Yosan Line located in Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture, Japan. The central station of the prefectural capital is on the Yosan line between Takamatsu, Kagawa and Uwajima, Ehime. Express trains head from Matsuyama to Okayama on Honshū, connecting with the Sanyō Shinkansen, and also to Takamatsu. The Okayama service is known as the Shiokaze and the Takamatsu service is known as the Ishizuchi (the name of the highest mountain on Shikoku). Southwards from Matsuyama, the Uwakai express train heads southwards to Uwajima
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Nankai Kōya Line
The Koya Line (高野線, Kōya sen) is a railway line in Osaka Prefecture and Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, owned and operated by the Nankai Electric Railway, a private railway operator. It connects Osaka and Koyasan, the capital of the Japanese Buddhist sect Shingon, via the suburbs of Osaka, such as Sakai, Osakasayama, Tondabayashi and Kawachinagano in Osaka Prefecture and Hashimoto and Kōya in Wakayama Prefecture
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Hashimoto Station (Wakayama)
Hashimoto Station (橋本駅, Hashimoto-eki) is a railway station in Hashimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.Contents1 Lines 2 Layout 3 Adjacent stations 4 External linksLines[edit]West Japan Railway CompanyWakayama LineNankai Electric Railway (NK77)Kōya LineLayout[edit] There is a single side platform and two island platforms served by five tracks. The side platform and the south island platform are used for the JR Wakayama Line (tracks 1, 2, 3)
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Keihan Main Line
The Keihan Main Line
Keihan Main Line
(京阪本線, Keihan-honsen) is a railway line in Japan operated by Keihan Electric Railway. The line runs between Sanjō Station in Kyoto
Kyoto
and Yodoyabashi Station
Yodoyabashi Station
in Osaka. There are through services to the Keihan Ōtō Line
Keihan Ōtō Line
and the Keihan Nakanoshima Line
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Yodoyabashi Station
Yodoyabashi Station (淀屋橋駅, Yodoyabashi-eki) is a railway station on the Osaka Municipal Subway Midosuji Line and the Keihan Railway Keihan Main Line. It is the nearest station to Osaka City Hall.Contents1 Lines 2 Layout2.1 Osaka Municipal Subway Midosuji Line 2.2 Keihan Railway Keihan Main Line3 Establishments around the station 4 Adjacent stations 5 ReferencesLines[edit]Osaka Municipal SubwayMidosuji Line (M17)Keihan Electric RailwayKeihan Main LineLayout[edit] Osaka Municipal Subway Midosuji Line[edit]Yodoyabashi 淀屋橋Osaka Municipal SubwaySubway platformOther names Osaka City Hall (市役所前)Operated by Osaka Municipal SubwayLine(s) Midōsuji LineConnectionsBus stopOther informationStation code M17HistoryOpened 1933Station layoutLegend↑ Umeda12↓ HommachiThe subway station is an island platform with two tracks on the 2nd basement
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Shunt (rail)
Shunting, in railway operations, is the process of sorting items of rolling stock into complete trains, or the reverse. In the United States this activity is known as "switching".Contents1 Motive power 2 Hazards 3 See also 4 Further readingMotive power[edit] Motive power is normally provided by a locomotive known as a shunter (in the UK) or switcher (in the USA). Most shunter/switchers are now diesel-powered but steam and even electric locomotives have been used. Where locomotives could not be used (e.g. because of weight restrictions) shunting operations have in the past been effected by horses or capstans. Hazards[edit] The terms "shunter" and "switcher" are applied not only to locomotives but to employees engaged on the ground with shunting/switching operations
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Siding (rail)
A siding, in rail terminology, is a low-speed track section distinct from a running line or through route such as a main line or branch line or spur. It may connect to through track or to other sidings at either end. Sidings often have lighter rails, meant for lower speed or less heavy traffic, and few, if any, signals. Sidings connected at both ends to a running line are commonly known as loops;[1][2][self-published source?] otherwise they are known as single-ended sidings or dead end sidings,[3] or (if short) stubs.[4]Contents1 Functions 2 Passing siding 3 Refuge siding 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyFunctions[edit] Sidings may be used for marshalling, stabling, storing, loading and unloading vehicles.[5][self-published source?] Common sidings store stationary rolling stock, especially for loading and unloading. Industrial sidings go to factories, mines, quarries, wharves, warehouses, some of them are essentially links to industrial railways
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Voluntary Sector
The voluntary sector or community sector (also non-profit sector or "not-for-profit" sector) is the duty of social activity undertaken by organizations that are not-for-profit[1] and non-governmental. This sector is also called the third sector,[2] in contrast to the public sector and the private sector
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Braking Distance
Braking distance refers to the distance a vehicle will travel from the point when its brakes are fully applied to when it comes to a complete stop. It is primarily affected by the original speed of the vehicle and the coefficient of friction between the tires and the road surface,[Note 1] and negligibly by the tires' rolling resistance and vehicle's air drag. The type of brake system in use only affects trucks and large mass vehicles, which cannot supply enough force to match the static frictional force.[1][Note 2] The braking distance is one of two principal components of the total stopping distance. The other component is the reaction distance, which is the product of the speed and the perception-reaction time of the driver/rider
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