HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Japanese Currency
Japanese currency
Japanese currency
has a history covering the period from the 8th century to the present
[...More...]

"Japanese Currency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Currency
A currency (from Middle English: curraunt, "in circulation", from Latin: currens, -entis), in the most specific use of the word, refers to money in any form when in actual use or circulation as a medium of exchange, especially circulating banknotes and coins.[1][2] A more general definition is that a currency is a system of money (monetary units) in common use, especially in a nation.[3] Under this definition, US dollars, British pounds, Australian dollars, and European euros are examples of currency. These various currencies are recognized stores of value and are traded between nations in foreign exchange markets, which determine the relative values of the different currencies.[4] Currencies in this sense are defined by governments, and each type has limited boundaries of acceptance. Other definitions of the term "currency" are discussed in their respective synonymous articles banknote, coin, and money
[...More...]

"Currency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hemp
Hemp, or industrial hemp (from Old English
Old English
hænep),[1] typically found in the northern hemisphere, is a variety of the Cannabis
Cannabis
sativa plant species that is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its
[...More...]

"Hemp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kai Province
Kai Province
Kai Province
(甲斐国, Kai-no-kuni) was a province of Japan in the area of Japan that is today Yamanashi Prefecture.[1] Kai bordered on Sagami, Suruga, Shinano and Musashi Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Kōshū (甲州). The origin of its name is uncertain. It lies in central Honshū, west of Tokyo, in a landlocked mountainous region that includes Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
along its border with modern Shizuoka Prefecture. Hiroshige
Hiroshige
ukiyo-e "Kai" in "The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States" (六十余州名所図会), depicting the Saruhashi, a bridge in what is now Ōtsuki, Yamanashi. Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Highways 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Kai was one of the original provinces of Japan established in the Nara period under the Taihō Code. The original capital of the province was located in what is now Fuefuki
[...More...]

"Kai Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ming Dynasty
The Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
(/mɪŋ/)[2] was the ruling dynasty of China
China
– then known as the Great Ming Empire
Empire
– for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Ming, described by Edwin O. Reischauer, John K. Fairbank and Albert M. Craig as "one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history",[3] was the last imperial dynasty in China ruled by ethnic Han Chinese
[...More...]

"Ming Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Northern Song
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

"Northern Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ming Era
The Ming dynasty (/mɪŋ/)[2] was the ruling dynasty of China – then known as the Great Ming Empire – for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Ming, described by Edwin O. Reischauer, John K. Fairbank and Albert M. Craig as "one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history",[3] was the last imperial dynasty in China ruled by ethnic Han Chinese
[...More...]

"Ming Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Korea
Korea
Korea
(/kəˈriːə/) is a historical region in East Asia; since 1945, it has been divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea") and South Korea
Korea
(officially the "Republic of Korea"). Located on the Korean Peninsula, Korea
Korea
is bordered by China
China
to the northwest and Russia
Russia
to the northeast. It is separated from Japan
Japan
to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan
Japan
(East Sea). Korea
Korea
emerged as a singular political entity in 676 AD, after centuries of conflict among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, which were unified as Unified Silla
Unified Silla
to the south and Balhae
Balhae
to the north
[...More...]

"Korea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vietnam
Coordinates: 16°10′N 107°50′E / 16.167°N 107.833°E / 16.167; 107.833Socialist Republic
Republic
of Vietnam Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam  (Vietnamese)FlagEmblemMotto: Độc lập – Tự do – Hạnh phúc "Independence – Freedom – Happiness"Anthem: Tiến Quân Ca[a] (English: "Army March")Location of  Vietnam  (green) in ASEAN  (dark grey)  –  [Legend]Capital Hanoi 21°2′N 105°51′E / 21.033°N 105.850°E / 21.033; 105.850Largest city
[...More...]

"Vietnam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wokou
Wokou
Wokou
(Chinese: 倭寇; pinyin: Wōkòu; Japanese: Wakō; Korean: 왜구 Waegu), which literally translates to "Japanese pirates" or "dwarf pirates",[1][2] were pirates who raided the coastlines of China, Japan
Japan
and Korea.[3] Wokou
Wokou
came from a mixture of ethnicities.[4] The term wokou is a combination of Wō (倭), referring to either dwarfs or pejoratively to the Japanese, and kòu (寇) "bandit".Contents1 History1.1 Early wokou 1.2 Later wokou2 Controversy over identity 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]14th and 16th-century pirate raidsThere are two distinct eras of wokou piracy. The early wokou mostly set up camp on Japanese outlying islands, as opposed to the 16th century wokou who were mostly non-Japanese
[...More...]

"Wokou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Filing (metalworking)
Filing is a material removal process in manufacturing. Similar, depending on use, to both sawing and grinding in effect, it is functionally versatile, but used mostly for finishing operations, namely in deburring operations. Filing operations can be used on a wide range of materials as a finishing operation. Filing helps achieve workpiece function by removing some excess material and deburring the surface. Sandpaper may be used as a filing tool for other materials, such as wood.Contents1 Band filing 2 Reciprocating filing 3 See also 4 References4.1 Bibliography5 Further reading 6 External linksBand filing[edit] Band Filing takes place on a machine similar to a belt sander, used like a band saw (used to cut wood). Band files are sectioned so that they can be made from stiff material, as they need to be to effectively remove material yet still work in a constant feed. A band filing operation can be used to remove small amounts of material with good accuracy
[...More...]

"Filing (metalworking)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(豊臣 秀吉, March 17, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a preeminent daimyō, warrior, general, samurai, and politician of the Sengoku period[1] who is regarded as Japan's second "great unifier".[2] He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi's castle. After his death, his young son Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Hideyoshi is noted for a number of cultural legacies, including the restriction that only members of the samurai class could bear arms. He financed the construction, restoration and rebuilding of many temples standing today in Kyoto. Outside of Japan, he is best known for ordering the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
[...More...]

"Toyotomi Hideyoshi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antimony
Antimony
Antimony
is a chemical element with symbol Sb (from Latin: stibium) and atomic number 51. A lustrous gray metalloid, it is found in nature mainly as the sulfide mineral stibnite (Sb2S3). Antimony
Antimony
compounds have been known since ancient times and were powdered for use as medicine and cosmetics, often known by the Arabic name, kohl.[4] Metallic antimony was also known, but it was erroneously identified as lead upon its discovery. The earliest known description of the metal in the West was written in 1540 by Vannoccio Biringuccio. For some time, China
China
has been the largest producer of antimony and its compounds, with most production coming from the Xikuangshan Mine in Hunan
[...More...]

"Antimony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
[...More...]

"Copper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nara Prefecture
Nara Prefecture
Nara Prefecture
(奈良県, Nara-ken) is a prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan.[2] The capital is the city of Nara.[3] Nara Prefecture has the distinction of having more UNESCO World Heritage Listings than any other prefecture.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Up to Nara Period 1.2 Nara in the Heian period 1.3 Medieval Nara 1.4 The Sengoku and Edo periods to present2 Geography2.1 Climate 2.2 Cities 2.3 Towns and villages 2.4 Mergers3 Demographics 4 Politics 5 Economy 6 Culture6.1 Dialect 6.2 Food culture 6.3 Traditional arts 6.4 Museums7 Education
[...More...]
"Nara Prefecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tang Period
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
[...More...]

"Tang Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.