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Jane Welsh Carlyle
Jane Welsh Carlyle
Jane Welsh Carlyle
(14 January 1801 – 21 April 1866, née Jane Baillie Welsh in Haddington Scotland) was the wife of essayist Thomas Carlyle. Their long marriage was close but tempestuous, complicated by other relationships on both sides, though these appear to have been platonic, as their own was believed to have been. Jane had first been introduced to Thomas by her tutor, who was in love with her but unable to break his engagement. Her closest romantic relationship seems to have been with Geraldine Jewsbury, though she resented Jewsbury’s free love life
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Samuel Laurence
Samuel Laurence
Samuel Laurence
(also spelled Lawrence; 1812–1884) was a British portrait painter.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Guildford, Surrey, in 1812, and early manifested a great love for art. The first portraits which he exhibited were at the Society of British Artists in 1834, but in 1836 he sent three portraits, including that of Mrs. Somerville, to the exhibition of the Royal Academy.[1] These were followed at the Academy by portraits of the Right Hon. Thomas Erskine, 1838; Thomas Carlyle, 1841; Sir Frederick Pollock, bart., 1842 and 1847; Charles Babbage, 1845; Dr. William Whewell, 1847; James Spedding, 1860; the Rev. William Hepworth Thompson, master of Trinity, and Robert Browning, 1869; Sir Thomas Watson, bart., M.D., 1870; and the Rev. Frederick Denison Maurice, 1871
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The Dismal Science
"The dismal science" is a derogatory alternative name for economics coined by the Victorian historian Thomas Carlyle
Thomas Carlyle
in the 19th century. The term drew a contrast with the then-familiar use of the phrase "gay science" to refer to song and verse writing.[1]Contents1 Origin 2 Beyond Carlyle 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOrigin[edit] The phrase "the dismal science" first occurs in Thomas Carlyle's 1849 tract called Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question, in which he argued in favor of reintroducing slavery in order to restore productivity to the West Indies:Not a "gay science", I should say, like some we have heard of; no, a dreary, desolate and, indeed, quite abject and distressing one; what we might call, by way of eminence, the dismal science.[2]It was "dismal" in "find[ing] the secret of this Universe in 'supply and demand', and reducing the duty of human governors to that of letting men alone"
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National Portrait Gallery, London
1,949,330 (2016)[1][2]Ranked 11th nationally Ranked 22nd art museum globally (2014)[1]Director Nicholas Cullinan[3]Public transit access Charing Cross Charing Cross; Leicester Square; EmbankmentWebsite npg.org.ukThe National Portrait
Portrait
Gallery (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people. It was the first portrait gallery in the world when it opened in 1856.[4] The gallery moved in 1896 to its current site at St Martin's Place, off Trafalgar Square, and adjoining the National Gallery. It has been expanded twice since then. The National Portrait Gallery also has regional outposts at Beningbrough Hall
Beningbrough Hall
in Yorkshire and Montacute House
Montacute House
in Somerset
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Charles Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens (/ˈdɪkɪnz/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.[1] His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity.[2][3] Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
(May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay "Nature". Following this work, he gave a speech entitled "The American Scholar" in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America's "intellectual Declaration of Independence".[3] Emerson wrote most of his important essays as lectures first and then revised them for print
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Leigh Hunt
James Henry Leigh Hunt
Leigh Hunt
(19 October 1784 – 28 August 1859), best known as Leigh Hunt, was an English critic, essayist, poet, and writer.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Education 1.3 Family 1.4 Natural behavior 1.5 Newspapers1.5.1 The Examiner 1.5.2 The Reflector 1.5.3 The Indicator 1.5.4 The Companion1.6 Poetry2 Friendship with Keats
Keats
and Shelley 3 More financial difficulties 4 Other works 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] James Henry Leigh Hunt
Leigh Hunt
was born at Southgate, London, where his parents had settled after leaving the United States. His father Isaac, a lawyer from Philadelphia, and his mother, Mary Shewell, a merchant's daughter and a devout Quaker, had been forced to come to Britain because of their loyalist sympathies during the American War of Independence
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The French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Captain Of Industry
In the late 19th century a captain of industry was a business leader whose means of amassing a personal fortune contributed positively to the country in some way. This may have been through increased productivity, expansion of markets, providing more jobs, or acts of philanthropy.[1] This characterisation contrasts with that of the robber baron, a business leader using political means to achieve personal ends. Versus "robber baron"[edit] Some 19th-century industrialists who were called "captains of industry" overlap with those called "robber barons". These include people such as J. P. Morgan, Andrew Carnegie, Andrew W. Mellon, Henry Ford, and John D. Rockefeller. The term was coined by Thomas Carlyle in his 1843 book, Past and Present. The education division of the National Endowment for the Humanities has prepared a lesson plan for schools asking whether "robber baron" or "captain of industry" is the better terminology
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Arrangement In Grey And Black, No. 2
In music, an arrangement is a musical reconceptualization of a previously composed work.[1] It may differ from the original work by means of reharmonization, melodic paraphrasing, orchestration, or development of the formal structure. Arranging differs from orchestration as the latter process is limited to the assignment of notes to instruments for performance by an orchestra, concert band, or other musical ensemble. Arranging "involves adding compositional techniques, such as new thematic material for introductions, transitions, or modulations, and endings.... Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety".[2]Contents1 Classical music 2 Popular music 3 Jazz 4 For instrumental groups4.1 Strings4.1.1 Size of the string section5 Further reading 6 See also 7 ReferencesClassical music[edit] Arrangement
Arrangement
and transcriptions of classical and serious music go back to the early history of this genre
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Margaret Oliphant
Margaret Oliphant
Margaret Oliphant
Wilson Oliphant (born Margaret Oliphant
Margaret Oliphant
Wilson) (4 April 1828 – 20 June 1897[1]), was a Scottish novelist and historical writer, who usually wrote as Mrs. Oliphant. Her fictional works encompass "domestic realism, the historical novel and tales of the supernatural".[2]Contents1 Life 2 Gallery 3 Works3.1 Novels 3.2 Short stories 3.3 Selected articles 3.4 Biographies 3.5 Historical and critical works 3.6 Critical reception 3.7 Revival of interest4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] The daughter of Francis W. Wilson (c. 1788 – 1858), a clerk, and his wife, Margaret Oliphant
Margaret Oliphant
(c. 1789 – 17 September 1854),[3] she was born at Wallyford, near Musselburgh, East Lothian, and spent her childhood at Lasswade
Lasswade
(near Dalkeith), Glasgow
Glasgow
and Liverpool
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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