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Jane Austen
Jane Austen
Jane Austen
(UK: /ˈɒstɪn/; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism.[2][b] Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars. With the publications of Sense and Sensibility
Sense and Sensibility
(1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park
Mansfield Park
(1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer
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Henry IV Of England
Henry IV (15 April 1367[1] – 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke (/ˈbɒlɪŋbrʊk/), was King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland
Ireland
from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France. Henry was born at Bolingbroke Castle
Bolingbroke Castle
in Lincolnshire
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Rector (ecclesiastical)
A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations,[1][2] and in Islam.[3] In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader.[4][5]Contents1 Historical usage1.1 Roman Catholic Church 1.2 Anglican churches 1.3 Protestant churches 1.4 Islam2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesHistorical usage[edit] In ancient times bishops, as rulers of cities and provinces, especially in the Papal States, were called rectors, as were administrators of the patrimony of the Church (e.g
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Parish
A parish is a church territorial entity constituting a division within a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor. Its association with the parish church remains paramount.[1] By extension the term parish refers not only to the territorial entity but to the people of its community or congregation as well as to church property within it
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Deane, Hampshire
Deane is a village and civil parish in the county of Hampshire, England. Its name appears in the name of the borough in which it is placed, Basingstoke and Deane.Contents1 Governance 2 Geography 3 See also 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksGovernance[edit] The village is a civil parish[2] and part of the Oakley and North Waltham ward of Basingstoke and Deane borough council.[3] The borough council is a Non-metropolitan district of Hampshire County Council. Geography[edit] The parish is surrounded by other Hampshire parishes, with Kingsclere north, Hannington north east, Oakley east, Dummer south east, North Waltham south, Steventon south west and Overton north west. See also[edit]List of places in HampshireFurther reading[edit]Deane, a brief history of the villageReferences[edit]^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 13 December 2016.  ^ "Deane". 2010
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St John's College, Oxford
St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford. Founded in 1555 by the merchant Sir Thomas White, intended to provide a source of educated Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
clerics to support the Counter-Reformation under Queen Mary
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All Souls College, Oxford
All Souls College (official name: College of the souls of all the faithful departed [2]) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Unique to All Souls, all of its members automatically become Fellows (i.e. full members of the College's governing body)
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Benefice
A benefice /ˈbɛnɪfɪs/ is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services. The Roman Empire used the Latin
Latin
term beneficium as a benefit to an individual from the Empire for services rendered. Its use was adopted by the Western Church
Western Church
in the Carolingian
Carolingian
Era as a benefit bestowed by the crown or church officials. A benefice specifically from a church is called a precaria (pl. precariae) such as a stipend and one from a monarch or nobleman is usually called a fief
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Typhus
Typhus, also known as typhus fever, is a group of infectious diseases that include epidemic typhus, scrub typhus and murine typhus.[1] Common symptoms include fever, headache, and a rash.[1] Typically these begin one to two weeks after exposure.[2] The diseases are caused by specific types of bacterial infection.[1] Epidemic typhus
Epidemic typhus
is due to Rickettsia prowazekii spread by body lice, scrub typhus is due to
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Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Richard Brinsley Butler Sheridan (30 October 1751 – 7 July 1816) was an Irish satirist, a playwright and poet, and long-term owner of the London
London
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. He is known for his plays such as The Rivals, The School for Scandal, The Duenna, and A Trip to Scarborough. He was also a Whig MP for 32 years in the British House of Commons for Stafford (1780–1806), Westminster (1806–1807), and Ilchester (1807–1812). He is buried at Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey
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The Rivals
The Rivals
The Rivals
is a comedy of manners by Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
in five acts which was first performed at Covent Garden Theatre
Covent Garden Theatre
on 17 January 1775.[2] The story has been updated in numerous adaptions, including a 1935 musical in London
London
and a 1958 episode of the television series Maverick, with attribution.Contents1 History1.1 Production 1.2 Reception2 Characters 3 Plot 4 Adaptations4.1 Musical (1935) 4.2 "Maverick" adaptation (1958) 4.3 Television productions 4.4 Jack Absolute Novels (2003-06)5 Biographical sources 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Production[edit] The Rivals
The Rivals
was Sheridan's first play. At the time, he was a young newlywed living in Bath. At Sheridan's insistence, upon marriage his wife Eliza (born Elizabeth Linley) had given up her career as a singer
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David Garrick
David Garrick
David Garrick
(19 February 1717 – 20 January 1779) was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century, and was a pupil and friend of Dr Samuel Johnson. He appeared in a number of amateur theatricals, and with his appearance in the title role of Shakespeare's Richard III, audiences and managers began to take notice. Impressed by his portrayals of Richard III and a number of other roles, Charles Fleetwood engaged Garrick for a season at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. He remained with the Drury Lane
Drury Lane
company for the next five years and purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. This purchase inaugurated 29 years of Garrick's management of the Drury Lane, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe
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Bon Ton (play)
Bon Ton; or, High Life About Stairs is a comedy act in two acts by David Garrick, first performed at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane on 18 March 1775. According to Garrick's introductory notice to the play, it had been written many years before.[1] References[edit]^ Stein, Elizabeth (2005). David Garrick, Dramatist. Kessinger Publishing. pp. 52–3. ISBN 1-4179-8798-7
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Foul Papers
Foul papers are an author's working drafts. The term is most often used in the study of the plays of Shakespeare and other dramatists of English Renaissance drama. Once the composition of a play was finished, a transcript or "fair copy" of the foul papers was prepared, by the author or by a scribe. The term "foul papers" is given different definitions by various scholars. For example, some define them as "the author's original drafts." W. W. Greg and Fredson Bowers define them as "The author's last complete draft, in a shape satisfactory to him for transfer to a fair copy.[1][2] E. A. J. Honigmann defines them as "any kind of draft preceding the first fair copy.[3] Paul Werstine states that foul papers "need not refer exclusively to authorial drafts", and that the term "simply describes papers that are to be, are being, or have already been transcribed," and that foul papers may once have been fair copies.[4] Few sets of foul papers actually exist from the era in question
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